CAREGIVER BURDEN AND FAMILY HARDINESS IN FAMILES RAISING A CHILD WITH A DISABILITY

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211685
Type:
Research Study
Title:
CAREGIVER BURDEN AND FAMILY HARDINESS IN FAMILES RAISING A CHILD WITH A DISABILITY
Abstract:
Purposes/Aims: We examined caregiver burden and family hardiness in families raising children with disabilities (CWD) to (a) determine if there are differences in ratings by parent gender and type of disability and (b) identify if hardiness was linked to caregiver burden. Background: Caregiver burden refers to perceived stresses associated with caring for a CWD and the impact caregiving has on caregivers. It is related to the child’s developmental delays, health complications, and cognitive/physical/behavioral impairments. Family hardiness refers to families who are more resistant to stress and able to cope better than other families, and includes perceiving life events as a challenge rather than a threat, believing families have a choice in how they react to stressors (internal locus of control), and being committed to/involved in family life. Although there is information in the literature on caregiver burden and family hardiness in families raising CWD, little is known about how these variables are linked or if ratings differ according to parent gender or type of disability. Methods: After IRB approval, 209 families living in a western state who were raising children with autism (CWA); Down syndrome (DS); multiple disabilities (MD) that included both cognitive and physical disabilities; and other disabilities (OD) including developmental delay, emotional disability, hearing/communication impairment, or ADHD participated. After consenting, both parents independently completed the 20-item Family Hardiness Index (McCubbin, McCubbin, & Thompson, 1991) and a revised version of the Caregiver Strain Index (Robinson, 1983). Mothers completed a demographic questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and correlations were performed to analyze the data. Results: Mothers (M age = 39.92 years) rated caregiver burden between sometimes and a lot whereas fathers (M age = 41.75 years) rated caregiver burden between rarely and sometimes. The mean hardiness score for both parents was 3.20, suggesting parents were fairly hardy. Mothers scored significantly higher on caregiver burden than fathers (M mothers = 2.10; M fathers = 1.80; F = 36.33, p<.001), but there was no difference between parents on ratings of hardiness. Parents of CWA scored significantly higher in caregiver burden (F = 6.07, p< .001) and significantly lower in hardiness (F = 3.70, p<.01) than parents of children with DS, OD or MD. Higher levels of hardiness were related to lower levels of caregiver burden (r = -.40, p<.001) for both parents. Implications: Mothers and parents of CWA experienced more caregiver burden than fathers or parents of children with DS, OD or MD. In addition, even though parents perceived themselves as fairly hardy, parents of CWA perceived themselves as having less family hardiness than parents raising children with DS, OD or MD. Therefore, it would be important to provide interventions and information about respite care and other appropriate community resources targeted to help mothers and parents of CWA as they care for their child.
Keywords:
Family caregiver; Children with disabilities
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4865
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleCAREGIVER BURDEN AND FAMILY HARDINESS IN FAMILES RAISING A CHILD WITH A DISABILITYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211685-
dc.description.abstractPurposes/Aims: We examined caregiver burden and family hardiness in families raising children with disabilities (CWD) to (a) determine if there are differences in ratings by parent gender and type of disability and (b) identify if hardiness was linked to caregiver burden. Background: Caregiver burden refers to perceived stresses associated with caring for a CWD and the impact caregiving has on caregivers. It is related to the child’s developmental delays, health complications, and cognitive/physical/behavioral impairments. Family hardiness refers to families who are more resistant to stress and able to cope better than other families, and includes perceiving life events as a challenge rather than a threat, believing families have a choice in how they react to stressors (internal locus of control), and being committed to/involved in family life. Although there is information in the literature on caregiver burden and family hardiness in families raising CWD, little is known about how these variables are linked or if ratings differ according to parent gender or type of disability. Methods: After IRB approval, 209 families living in a western state who were raising children with autism (CWA); Down syndrome (DS); multiple disabilities (MD) that included both cognitive and physical disabilities; and other disabilities (OD) including developmental delay, emotional disability, hearing/communication impairment, or ADHD participated. After consenting, both parents independently completed the 20-item Family Hardiness Index (McCubbin, McCubbin, & Thompson, 1991) and a revised version of the Caregiver Strain Index (Robinson, 1983). Mothers completed a demographic questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and correlations were performed to analyze the data. Results: Mothers (M age = 39.92 years) rated caregiver burden between sometimes and a lot whereas fathers (M age = 41.75 years) rated caregiver burden between rarely and sometimes. The mean hardiness score for both parents was 3.20, suggesting parents were fairly hardy. Mothers scored significantly higher on caregiver burden than fathers (M mothers = 2.10; M fathers = 1.80; F = 36.33, p<.001), but there was no difference between parents on ratings of hardiness. Parents of CWA scored significantly higher in caregiver burden (F = 6.07, p< .001) and significantly lower in hardiness (F = 3.70, p<.01) than parents of children with DS, OD or MD. Higher levels of hardiness were related to lower levels of caregiver burden (r = -.40, p<.001) for both parents. Implications: Mothers and parents of CWA experienced more caregiver burden than fathers or parents of children with DS, OD or MD. In addition, even though parents perceived themselves as fairly hardy, parents of CWA perceived themselves as having less family hardiness than parents raising children with DS, OD or MD. Therefore, it would be important to provide interventions and information about respite care and other appropriate community resources targeted to help mothers and parents of CWA as they care for their child.en_GB
dc.subjectFamily caregiveren_GB
dc.subjectChildren with disabilitiesen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:08:22Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:08:22Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:08:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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