2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211687
Type:
Research Study
Title:
CHALLENGES AND STRATEGIES IN CONDUCTING RESEARCH WITH MENTALLY ILL YOUTH
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss challenges and strategies for conducting clinical research with mentally ill youth using our completed Randomized Control Trial (RCT) of self-management for  youth with schizophrenia. Background: Schizophrenia is a complex mental illness with severe psychiatric symptoms that interfere with psychosocial functioning and require intensive and comprehensive care from family members. In spite of the importance of developing and providing an appropriate intervention program for schizophrenia, in particular, youth with schizophrenia and their family members, researchers have faced challenges in conducting clinical trials involving subjects with mental illnesses. Methods: The study was a two-group randomized clinical trial with 40 families who had a youth aged 15 to 19 with schizophrenia. Subjects included the youth and their family members who were involved in the care of the mentally ill youth. The treatment group consisted of 49 parents and other adults such as grandparents, 24 teens with schizophrenia, and 20 siblings. The control group consisted of 59 family members with 25 parents and older adults, 16 youth with schizophrenia, and 20 siblings. The treatment consisted of 12 2-hour sessions with 6 intense weekly sessions followed by 6 monthly booster sessions. Results: One of most challenging aspects of our clinical trial was recruiting and retaining eligible youth with schizophrenia because most of them were not  aware of clinical trials, lacked motivation to participate in clinical trials, or had experienced  stigma of mental illness and didn’t want to admit to having a mental illness. For our study, a total of 117 out of 161 youth who were referred to the research team were screened for eligibility. Only 41 subjects met the eligible criteria, and a total 18 subjects in a treatment group and 13 in a control group completed follow-up assessment. Second, intervention content such as abstract concepts, wordy descriptions, or homework were not useful for this population because of cognitive impairments inherent to schizophrenia. Third, each family member expressed their own concerns. Younger siblings fear becoming mentally ill; Parents desperately expressed the need of psychoeducation, in particular, during the initial stages of schizophrenia in order to learn how to manage the illness. Implications: Health care providers are in positions to initiate discussions regarding participating in clinical trials and to direct eligible subjects to research teams. We may develop a system for health clinicians to introduce research and direct potential subjects to research teams with less effort. A strategy most helpful in recruiting and retaining youth is involving the family, especially the primary parent in the youth’s care. When the parent is involved in the clinical trial, the parent is in charge of attending intervention sessions and visiting research sites regularly. To be meaningful to the mentally ill youth, the content of the psychosocial intervention needs  to be concrete and simple so the youth can understand the concepts being presented, and reflect each family member’s specific concerns. Examples from such a clinical trial will be presented. NIMH R01-MH56580.
Keywords:
Chronically mentally ill; Youth; Schizophrenia
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4880
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleCHALLENGES AND STRATEGIES IN CONDUCTING RESEARCH WITH MENTALLY ILL YOUTHen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211687-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss challenges and strategies for conducting clinical research with mentally ill youth using our completed Randomized Control Trial (RCT) of self-management for  youth with schizophrenia. Background: Schizophrenia is a complex mental illness with severe psychiatric symptoms that interfere with psychosocial functioning and require intensive and comprehensive care from family members. In spite of the importance of developing and providing an appropriate intervention program for schizophrenia, in particular, youth with schizophrenia and their family members, researchers have faced challenges in conducting clinical trials involving subjects with mental illnesses. Methods: The study was a two-group randomized clinical trial with 40 families who had a youth aged 15 to 19 with schizophrenia. Subjects included the youth and their family members who were involved in the care of the mentally ill youth. The treatment group consisted of 49 parents and other adults such as grandparents, 24 teens with schizophrenia, and 20 siblings. The control group consisted of 59 family members with 25 parents and older adults, 16 youth with schizophrenia, and 20 siblings. The treatment consisted of 12 2-hour sessions with 6 intense weekly sessions followed by 6 monthly booster sessions. Results: One of most challenging aspects of our clinical trial was recruiting and retaining eligible youth with schizophrenia because most of them were not  aware of clinical trials, lacked motivation to participate in clinical trials, or had experienced  stigma of mental illness and didn’t want to admit to having a mental illness. For our study, a total of 117 out of 161 youth who were referred to the research team were screened for eligibility. Only 41 subjects met the eligible criteria, and a total 18 subjects in a treatment group and 13 in a control group completed follow-up assessment. Second, intervention content such as abstract concepts, wordy descriptions, or homework were not useful for this population because of cognitive impairments inherent to schizophrenia. Third, each family member expressed their own concerns. Younger siblings fear becoming mentally ill; Parents desperately expressed the need of psychoeducation, in particular, during the initial stages of schizophrenia in order to learn how to manage the illness. Implications: Health care providers are in positions to initiate discussions regarding participating in clinical trials and to direct eligible subjects to research teams. We may develop a system for health clinicians to introduce research and direct potential subjects to research teams with less effort. A strategy most helpful in recruiting and retaining youth is involving the family, especially the primary parent in the youth’s care. When the parent is involved in the clinical trial, the parent is in charge of attending intervention sessions and visiting research sites regularly. To be meaningful to the mentally ill youth, the content of the psychosocial intervention needs  to be concrete and simple so the youth can understand the concepts being presented, and reflect each family member’s specific concerns. Examples from such a clinical trial will be presented. NIMH R01-MH56580.en_GB
dc.subjectChronically mentally illen_GB
dc.subjectYouthen_GB
dc.subjectSchizophreniaen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:08:29Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:08:29Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:08:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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