2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211689
Type:
Research Study
Title:
TESTING A PREDICTIVE MODEL OF WEIGHT-BASED STIGMA in LOW-INCOME ADOLESCENTS
Abstract:
Purposes/Aims: The impact from weight-based stigma may have both immediate and potentially lasting ramifications on the health and well-being of overweight and obese adolescents.  This study 1) describes body mass index (BMI), weight perception, personal control, guilt, blameworthiness, and weight-based stigma in low income and multi-ethnic adolescents; 2) examines the relationships between BMI, weight perception, personal control, guilt, blameworthiness, and weight-based stigma; and 3) tests a predictive model of weight-based stigma using the variables. Background: Despite extensive literature examining the use of Attribution Theory to explain behaviors in overweight and obese adults, the theory has not been previously used to examine guilt and blameworthiness in low income adolescents. Examining the influences of attributes such as guilt and blameworthiness, and weight perceptions and how they affect weight-based stigma is an area of research that warrants further investigation. Methods: One hundred and five adolescents recruited from low-income neighborhoods completed a self-report questionnaire to assess perceived weight, personal control, guilt and blameworthiness, and weight-based stigma. Participant’s heights and weights were measured at the time of data collection. Results and Implications: Overall, 20.3% and 26.7% of the sample were overweight and obese, respectively. Participants with higher BMIs in our sample reported higher levels of weight-based stigma.  One third of the participants believed that their body shape is completely within their control. Participants with average BMIs had lower means for guilt M=2.75 (SD=1.94) and for blame M=3.23 (SD=2.46) compared to the obese adolescents M=6.25 (SD=3.11) for guilt and M=6.64 (SD=2.92) for blame. BMI was significantly correlated to weight perceptions (r=0.72, p<.01), guilt (r=0.45, p<.01), blameworthiness (r=0.43, p<.01) and weight-based stigma (r=0.47, p<.01). In addition, income was negatively correlated to weight-based stigma (r= -0.19, p<.05).  BMI, guilt, and blameworthiness accounted for approximately 34% of the variance in weight based stigma scores of the sample (F (6,98) = 10.029 p< .001). The overall model of BMI, guilt, and blame significantly predicted weight-based stigma.  Changing perceptions of the causes and effects of obesity will be the first step in preventing discrimination against obese individuals. Awareness about weight-based stigma and its deleterious effects should occur at the local and national level.  Future interventional studies should focus on reducing the effects of weight-based stigma, and decreasing the sense of guilt and blameworthiness felt by obese adolescents. Counseling and behavioral interventions are paramount to curve the financial costs and burden of obesity and also to continue to improve the quality of care of this low-income adolescent population.
Keywords:
Obesity; Youth; Stigma
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4894
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleTESTING A PREDICTIVE MODEL OF WEIGHT-BASED STIGMA in LOW-INCOME ADOLESCENTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211689-
dc.description.abstractPurposes/Aims: The impact from weight-based stigma may have both immediate and potentially lasting ramifications on the health and well-being of overweight and obese adolescents.  This study 1) describes body mass index (BMI), weight perception, personal control, guilt, blameworthiness, and weight-based stigma in low income and multi-ethnic adolescents; 2) examines the relationships between BMI, weight perception, personal control, guilt, blameworthiness, and weight-based stigma; and 3) tests a predictive model of weight-based stigma using the variables. Background: Despite extensive literature examining the use of Attribution Theory to explain behaviors in overweight and obese adults, the theory has not been previously used to examine guilt and blameworthiness in low income adolescents. Examining the influences of attributes such as guilt and blameworthiness, and weight perceptions and how they affect weight-based stigma is an area of research that warrants further investigation. Methods: One hundred and five adolescents recruited from low-income neighborhoods completed a self-report questionnaire to assess perceived weight, personal control, guilt and blameworthiness, and weight-based stigma. Participant’s heights and weights were measured at the time of data collection. Results and Implications: Overall, 20.3% and 26.7% of the sample were overweight and obese, respectively. Participants with higher BMIs in our sample reported higher levels of weight-based stigma.  One third of the participants believed that their body shape is completely within their control. Participants with average BMIs had lower means for guilt M=2.75 (SD=1.94) and for blame M=3.23 (SD=2.46) compared to the obese adolescents M=6.25 (SD=3.11) for guilt and M=6.64 (SD=2.92) for blame. BMI was significantly correlated to weight perceptions (r=0.72, p<.01), guilt (r=0.45, p<.01), blameworthiness (r=0.43, p<.01) and weight-based stigma (r=0.47, p<.01). In addition, income was negatively correlated to weight-based stigma (r= -0.19, p<.05).  BMI, guilt, and blameworthiness accounted for approximately 34% of the variance in weight based stigma scores of the sample (F (6,98) = 10.029 p< .001). The overall model of BMI, guilt, and blame significantly predicted weight-based stigma.  Changing perceptions of the causes and effects of obesity will be the first step in preventing discrimination against obese individuals. Awareness about weight-based stigma and its deleterious effects should occur at the local and national level.  Future interventional studies should focus on reducing the effects of weight-based stigma, and decreasing the sense of guilt and blameworthiness felt by obese adolescents. Counseling and behavioral interventions are paramount to curve the financial costs and burden of obesity and also to continue to improve the quality of care of this low-income adolescent population.en_GB
dc.subjectObesityen_GB
dc.subjectYouthen_GB
dc.subjectStigmaen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:08:36Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:08:36Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:08:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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