2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211691
Type:
Research Study
Title:
MARKETING BALANCE AND STRENGTH CLASSES TO PREVENT FALLS in OLDER ADULTS
Abstract:
Purpose.  We describe the diffusion and acceptability of a social marketing program to increase older adults’ participation in a balance and strength exercise program marketed through churches and designed to reduce falls. The initial qualitative phase of the study identified community themes about aging and falls to develop and refine marketing messages. This post-intervention follow-up describes church members’ and leaders’ recall and perceptions of, and responses to, the marketing messages and identifies facilitators and barriers to participation in balance and strength classes experienced by older adults. Background. Community-based group balance and strength classes reduce falls among older adults.  Social marketing through churches is a promising approach to promote participation through existing networks of older adults. Methods.  A qualitative study analyzed data from focus groups (n=4) and interviews (n=32) with older adult church members, church leaders who hosted the marketing program, leaders of recreation departments that delivered the classes, and the health department liaison who coordinated the effort. Data were inductively coded and formed into categories.  Themes were developed to describe overarching aspects of the experience. Analysis included comparisons across levels of participation in the balance classes (high, low, or no participation) as well as among stakeholder groups. Results.  Older adult church members responded to messages emphasizing “independence,” “relationships,” and "comfort zone,” all themes identified in initial qualitative research. They heard about the classes through church-sponsored routes. Most influential were word-of-mouth reports that the classes were relevant to them.  Barriers and facilitators identified previously were confirmed. Participation was facilitated when participants believed the classes improved balance and strength and were convenient and affordable. Lack of information about the nature of the classes and conflicting schedules inhibited participation. Church leaders chose to implement the marketing program to meet their congregations’ needs and to deepen support within each church community. Recreation leaders pointed out the health department’s assistance in marketing and underwriting the cost of classes as key to sustainability.  Implications.  Post-intervention data confirmed the importance of messages about the social nature of participation in a “comfort zone” of familiarity, with increased independence as a key benefit.  Program acceptability was achieved through initial qualitative research that informed the marketing messages. Diffusion of marketing messages was enhanced by the effective collaboration of program partners.
Keywords:
Elderly; Fall reduction; Exercise program
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4899
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleMARKETING BALANCE AND STRENGTH CLASSES TO PREVENT FALLS in OLDER ADULTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211691-
dc.description.abstractPurpose.  We describe the diffusion and acceptability of a social marketing program to increase older adults’ participation in a balance and strength exercise program marketed through churches and designed to reduce falls. The initial qualitative phase of the study identified community themes about aging and falls to develop and refine marketing messages. This post-intervention follow-up describes church members’ and leaders’ recall and perceptions of, and responses to, the marketing messages and identifies facilitators and barriers to participation in balance and strength classes experienced by older adults. Background. Community-based group balance and strength classes reduce falls among older adults.  Social marketing through churches is a promising approach to promote participation through existing networks of older adults. Methods.  A qualitative study analyzed data from focus groups (n=4) and interviews (n=32) with older adult church members, church leaders who hosted the marketing program, leaders of recreation departments that delivered the classes, and the health department liaison who coordinated the effort. Data were inductively coded and formed into categories.  Themes were developed to describe overarching aspects of the experience. Analysis included comparisons across levels of participation in the balance classes (high, low, or no participation) as well as among stakeholder groups. Results.  Older adult church members responded to messages emphasizing “independence,” “relationships,” and "comfort zone,” all themes identified in initial qualitative research. They heard about the classes through church-sponsored routes. Most influential were word-of-mouth reports that the classes were relevant to them.  Barriers and facilitators identified previously were confirmed. Participation was facilitated when participants believed the classes improved balance and strength and were convenient and affordable. Lack of information about the nature of the classes and conflicting schedules inhibited participation. Church leaders chose to implement the marketing program to meet their congregations’ needs and to deepen support within each church community. Recreation leaders pointed out the health department’s assistance in marketing and underwriting the cost of classes as key to sustainability.  Implications.  Post-intervention data confirmed the importance of messages about the social nature of participation in a “comfort zone” of familiarity, with increased independence as a key benefit.  Program acceptability was achieved through initial qualitative research that informed the marketing messages. Diffusion of marketing messages was enhanced by the effective collaboration of program partners.en_GB
dc.subjectElderlyen_GB
dc.subjectFall reductionen_GB
dc.subjectExercise programen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:08:43Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:08:43Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:08:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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