THE EFFECT OF RELATIONSHIPS ON BEHAVIOR: ADOLESCENT TRANSITION TO EMERGING ADULTHOOD

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211692
Type:
Research Study
Title:
THE EFFECT OF RELATIONSHIPS ON BEHAVIOR: ADOLESCENT TRANSITION TO EMERGING ADULTHOOD
Abstract:
Purpose: Guided by the life course theory, the purposes of this research were to better understand the role that peer and parent relationships, and gender have on reckless and deviant behaviors during the time of transition from adolescence to emerging adulthood. Background: Reckless behaviors (minor theft, substance abuse, and unprotected intercourse) are common during adolescence. Once an adolescent proceeds down a life course characterized by these behaviors, changing direction can be difficult. It is not known which adolescents engaging in reckless behaviors are most at risk for progressing to deviant behaviors (assault, drug dealing, and violent crimes) during emerging adulthood. Methods: This quantitative study used Wave I and Wave III data from the Add Health study. The public-use data set comprised one-half of the core sample of adolescents completing the Wave I in-home interview. Wave III respondents were a pool of Wave I adolescents participating in in-home follow-up interviews. The specific variables (adolescent reckless behavior, emerging adult deviant behavior, peer relationships, and parent relationships) were systematically selected from the data set. Confirmatory factor analysis tested relationships between variables and constructs. General estimating equations tested study hypotheses. Results:  Total study sample size was 3,142 males and 3,352 females. Overall, adolescent reckless behavior was significantly associated with emerging adult deviant behavior (Wald c2 (1, N = 4,615) = 105, p < .001, β = .152, SE(β) = .015), slightly more for females (β = .157, SE(β) = .015) than males (β = .132, SE(β) = .015). Adolescent reckless behavior increases the probability of emerging adult deviant behavior among those adolescents having lower scores on the quality of peer relationships (Wald c2 (1, N = 4,615) = 56, p < .001, β = .062, SE(β) = .008) and the quality of parent relationships (Wald c2 (1, N = 4,545) = 36, p < .001 β = .052, SE(β) = .009) scales. Implications: Although scholars have hypothesized relationships among adolescent reckless behavior, deviant behavior, gender, and relationships, this was the first study to test and confirm these associations. Human growth and development, and health promotion are important aspects to nursing. This research highlights the importance and significance of identifying and intervening in early adolescent problem behavior. In the clinical practice arena, these study results can guide assessment and interventions for adolescents during their transition into adulthood. During episodic clinic visits, clinicians should routinely ask about available support systems, particularly family and peer support. In intervening in the lives of those most at risk, clinicians can promote optimum development and protect the integrity and significance of the parent-child relationship.
Keywords:
Peer relationships; Parent child relationships; Reckless behavior; Adolescents
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4902
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleTHE EFFECT OF RELATIONSHIPS ON BEHAVIOR: ADOLESCENT TRANSITION TO EMERGING ADULTHOODen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211692-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Guided by the life course theory, the purposes of this research were to better understand the role that peer and parent relationships, and gender have on reckless and deviant behaviors during the time of transition from adolescence to emerging adulthood. Background: Reckless behaviors (minor theft, substance abuse, and unprotected intercourse) are common during adolescence. Once an adolescent proceeds down a life course characterized by these behaviors, changing direction can be difficult. It is not known which adolescents engaging in reckless behaviors are most at risk for progressing to deviant behaviors (assault, drug dealing, and violent crimes) during emerging adulthood. Methods: This quantitative study used Wave I and Wave III data from the Add Health study. The public-use data set comprised one-half of the core sample of adolescents completing the Wave I in-home interview. Wave III respondents were a pool of Wave I adolescents participating in in-home follow-up interviews. The specific variables (adolescent reckless behavior, emerging adult deviant behavior, peer relationships, and parent relationships) were systematically selected from the data set. Confirmatory factor analysis tested relationships between variables and constructs. General estimating equations tested study hypotheses. Results:  Total study sample size was 3,142 males and 3,352 females. Overall, adolescent reckless behavior was significantly associated with emerging adult deviant behavior (Wald c2 (1, N = 4,615) = 105, p < .001, β = .152, SE(β) = .015), slightly more for females (β = .157, SE(β) = .015) than males (β = .132, SE(β) = .015). Adolescent reckless behavior increases the probability of emerging adult deviant behavior among those adolescents having lower scores on the quality of peer relationships (Wald c2 (1, N = 4,615) = 56, p < .001, β = .062, SE(β) = .008) and the quality of parent relationships (Wald c2 (1, N = 4,545) = 36, p < .001 β = .052, SE(β) = .009) scales. Implications: Although scholars have hypothesized relationships among adolescent reckless behavior, deviant behavior, gender, and relationships, this was the first study to test and confirm these associations. Human growth and development, and health promotion are important aspects to nursing. This research highlights the importance and significance of identifying and intervening in early adolescent problem behavior. In the clinical practice arena, these study results can guide assessment and interventions for adolescents during their transition into adulthood. During episodic clinic visits, clinicians should routinely ask about available support systems, particularly family and peer support. In intervening in the lives of those most at risk, clinicians can promote optimum development and protect the integrity and significance of the parent-child relationship.en_GB
dc.subjectPeer relationshipsen_GB
dc.subjectParent child relationshipsen_GB
dc.subjectReckless behavioren_GB
dc.subjectAdolescentsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:08:46Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:08:46Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:08:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.