2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211693
Type:
Research Study
Title:
SUPPORTIVE NEEDS OF ADOLESCENTS WHEN INITIATING BREASTFEEDING
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this study was to explore the needs of adolescents for social support from nurses when initiating breastfeeding through conducting a secondary qualitative analysis of de-identified data from a psychometric study conducted by one of the researchers. Rationale: The recent publication of The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding has highlighted the health costs of not breastfeeding.  Unfortunately, adolescents initiate and continue breastfeeding at rates that fall below the Healthy People 2020 breastfeeding goal of increasing the proportion of infants who are ever breastfed to 82% and who are breastfed exclusively at 3 months to 46%. Nurses who provide care to adolescents and their newborns in the immediate postpartum can influence their breastfeeding rates through the social support they offer adolescent mothers as they initiate breastfeeding. Methods: Secondary qualitative content analysis of adolescents’ responses to open-ended questions was conducted using social support theory as a framework. The two researchers independently categorized each as emotional, appraisal, informational, and/or instrumental social support. They collaboratively identified specific nurse behaviors that meet the supportive needs of adolescent mothers when initiating breastfeeding. Results: The results of the analysis showed what kinds of support adolescent mothers would like to have from nurses. Adolescent mothers wanted nurses to take the time to explain about breastfeeding, answer their questions, and provide consistent information, which supported their informational needs. Emotional needs were met as the nurse provided for the adolescents’ privacy, treated them with respect, stayed calm, and asked first what they knew about breastfeeding. The adolescent mothers wanted nurses to support their appraisal needs by praising and encouraging their efforts to breastfeed, which helped them feel confident. For instrumental support, adolescent mothers preferred to have hands on tips and tricks about positioning, latching, and baby behavior as well as wanting nurses to stay with them as they learned to breastfeed. They also valued being given opportunities to work out breastfeeding under the nurse’s guidance. Clinical Relevance: This study provides nurses with information about the kinds of social support adolescent mothers value as they learn to breastfeed.  Adolescents feel supported when nurses take the time to talk with them about breastfeeding and to help them breastfeed.  Nurses can use the findings of this study to reflect upon how they provide breastfeeding support for adolescent mothers in the immediate postpartum.
Keywords:
Breastfeeding in adolescents; Nursing Care
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4903
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleSUPPORTIVE NEEDS OF ADOLESCENTS WHEN INITIATING BREASTFEEDINGen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211693-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims: The purpose of this study was to explore the needs of adolescents for social support from nurses when initiating breastfeeding through conducting a secondary qualitative analysis of de-identified data from a psychometric study conducted by one of the researchers. Rationale: The recent publication of The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding has highlighted the health costs of not breastfeeding.  Unfortunately, adolescents initiate and continue breastfeeding at rates that fall below the Healthy People 2020 breastfeeding goal of increasing the proportion of infants who are ever breastfed to 82% and who are breastfed exclusively at 3 months to 46%. Nurses who provide care to adolescents and their newborns in the immediate postpartum can influence their breastfeeding rates through the social support they offer adolescent mothers as they initiate breastfeeding. Methods: Secondary qualitative content analysis of adolescents’ responses to open-ended questions was conducted using social support theory as a framework. The two researchers independently categorized each as emotional, appraisal, informational, and/or instrumental social support. They collaboratively identified specific nurse behaviors that meet the supportive needs of adolescent mothers when initiating breastfeeding. Results: The results of the analysis showed what kinds of support adolescent mothers would like to have from nurses. Adolescent mothers wanted nurses to take the time to explain about breastfeeding, answer their questions, and provide consistent information, which supported their informational needs. Emotional needs were met as the nurse provided for the adolescents’ privacy, treated them with respect, stayed calm, and asked first what they knew about breastfeeding. The adolescent mothers wanted nurses to support their appraisal needs by praising and encouraging their efforts to breastfeed, which helped them feel confident. For instrumental support, adolescent mothers preferred to have hands on tips and tricks about positioning, latching, and baby behavior as well as wanting nurses to stay with them as they learned to breastfeed. They also valued being given opportunities to work out breastfeeding under the nurse’s guidance. Clinical Relevance: This study provides nurses with information about the kinds of social support adolescent mothers value as they learn to breastfeed.  Adolescents feel supported when nurses take the time to talk with them about breastfeeding and to help them breastfeed.  Nurses can use the findings of this study to reflect upon how they provide breastfeeding support for adolescent mothers in the immediate postpartum.en_GB
dc.subjectBreastfeeding in adolescentsen_GB
dc.subjectNursing Careen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:08:50Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:08:50Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:08:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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