A PROGRAM EVALUATION OF SEA MAR'S CHRONIC CARE PROGRAM FOR PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211694
Type:
Research Study
Title:
A PROGRAM EVALUATION OF SEA MAR'S CHRONIC CARE PROGRAM FOR PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study is to evaluate the chronic care coordinator (CCC) role within the chronic care model (CCM) at Sea Mar, a community healthcare organization in western Washington. Sea Mar implemented the CCM in 2002 and augmented it in 2009 with the addition of CCCs, similar to case managers in other health care organizations. There has been no evaluation of the model to date. Background/Rationale: Sea Mar began implementing the CCM in 2000 in Seattle, and expanded to network wide implementation by the summer of 2008.  The primary mission of Sea Mar is to improve the quality of care delivered to diverse, underserved populations, while decreasing the negative outcomes associated with chronic illnesses such as diabetes, hypertension, asthma, and heart disease.  Sea Mar implemented the care coordinator role to help providers and staff better meet the needs of chronically ill patients. Methods: Qualitative data was collected from care coordinators (n=3) and English and Spanish speaking patients (n=16). Interviews were guided by open-ended questions using a descriptive phenomenological approach. Data was examined for themes to reveal satisfaction, perceived quality of care, and strengths and barriers to success of the care model. Results: Patients and care coordinators report the chronic care coordinator implementation has improved patient care. Perceived strengths include improved effectiveness in patient education and support, increased access to resources and effective productivity standards. Barriers to implementation include insufficient support from providers and staff, scarce “private” space within clinics, inadequate in-depth diabetes training and a new electronic health record. Major themes among patient interviews include knowledge, mindset and relationships, each of which influences self-management of diabetes (the fourth theme). Differences between the two patient groups, Caucasian vs. Latino, are depth and breadth of knowledge, locus of control, affinity for the CCC and personal accountability versus blame for circumstances. Implications: The CCC role appears to be highly relevant to patients and, according to CCCs, the role is well integrated into the model of care. However, future research with larger samples is needed to further explore themes among staff and patients. This work was supported in part by grants from the Sinegal Foundation, and the National Institute of Health NCRR grant UL1RR025014.
Keywords:
Chronic care coordinator; Chronic care model
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4904
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleA PROGRAM EVALUATION OF SEA MAR'S CHRONIC CARE PROGRAM FOR PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211694-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this pilot study is to evaluate the chronic care coordinator (CCC) role within the chronic care model (CCM) at Sea Mar, a community healthcare organization in western Washington. Sea Mar implemented the CCM in 2002 and augmented it in 2009 with the addition of CCCs, similar to case managers in other health care organizations. There has been no evaluation of the model to date. Background/Rationale: Sea Mar began implementing the CCM in 2000 in Seattle, and expanded to network wide implementation by the summer of 2008.  The primary mission of Sea Mar is to improve the quality of care delivered to diverse, underserved populations, while decreasing the negative outcomes associated with chronic illnesses such as diabetes, hypertension, asthma, and heart disease.  Sea Mar implemented the care coordinator role to help providers and staff better meet the needs of chronically ill patients. Methods: Qualitative data was collected from care coordinators (n=3) and English and Spanish speaking patients (n=16). Interviews were guided by open-ended questions using a descriptive phenomenological approach. Data was examined for themes to reveal satisfaction, perceived quality of care, and strengths and barriers to success of the care model. Results: Patients and care coordinators report the chronic care coordinator implementation has improved patient care. Perceived strengths include improved effectiveness in patient education and support, increased access to resources and effective productivity standards. Barriers to implementation include insufficient support from providers and staff, scarce “private” space within clinics, inadequate in-depth diabetes training and a new electronic health record. Major themes among patient interviews include knowledge, mindset and relationships, each of which influences self-management of diabetes (the fourth theme). Differences between the two patient groups, Caucasian vs. Latino, are depth and breadth of knowledge, locus of control, affinity for the CCC and personal accountability versus blame for circumstances. Implications: The CCC role appears to be highly relevant to patients and, according to CCCs, the role is well integrated into the model of care. However, future research with larger samples is needed to further explore themes among staff and patients. This work was supported in part by grants from the Sinegal Foundation, and the National Institute of Health NCRR grant UL1RR025014.en_GB
dc.subjectChronic care coordinatoren_GB
dc.subjectChronic care modelen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:08:53Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:08:53Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:08:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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