PARENTING AND CHINESE AMERICAN ADOLESCENTS' PSYCHOSOCIAL HEALTH: VOICES FROM PARENTS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211696
Type:
Research Study
Title:
PARENTING AND CHINESE AMERICAN ADOLESCENTS' PSYCHOSOCIAL HEALTH: VOICES FROM PARENTS
Abstract:
Purpose: This qualitative study aimed to gain an in-depth understanding of Chinese American parents’ parenting styles and how parenting styles might influence adolescents’ psychosocial health. Background: Asian Americans are one of the fastest growing minority groups in the U.S., with the Chinese being the largest group. While the model minority perception of Asian Americans persists, evidence suggests that Asian American adolescents experience higher levels of depressive symptoms than their same-gender White counterparts. Quantitative findings suggest associations between parenting factors (e.g., parental control, monitoring) and Chinese American youth’s mental health. A qualitative understanding regarding Chinese American parents’ parenting styles and their relationship with youth’s psychosocial health is warranted. Methods: The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 13 Chinese American adolescents’ parents (10 mothers and 3 fathers) through Chinese schools and churches in a southwest metropolitan area. Four focus groups were conducted in the participants’ preferred language: English or Chinese. Group discussions were held in a safe room (60-90 minutes each) and were audiotaped with permission. Demographic characteristics, immigration history, and acculturation data were obtained in a survey (available in English and two Chinese written versions: traditional and simplified). Two investigators independently conducted a qualitative analysis of the transcribed transcripts and summarized the findings using an 8-step content analysis method (Downe-Wamboldt, 1992). Descriptive statistics were calculated for all measures in the quantitative survey. Results: The 13 participants were ages 35 to 56 years old (M = 48; SD = 5.8). One parent (7.7%) was U.S. born, and one came to the U.S. before age 18.  Most parents (n=12, 92.3%) held a bachelor’s degree or higher; they worked as professionals such as engineers (23.1%), accountants (15.4%), or teachers (15.4%). Ten (76.9%) parents reported using Chinese when speaking to their children, and two (15.3%) only used English. Most (n=11, 84.6%) parents identified themselves as speaking and understanding English moderately or very well. They reported higher Chinese orientation scores (M = 30.0; SD =4.9) than U. S. orientation scores (M = 25.1; SD = 3.7). Four themes were generated from the focus groups data. Chinese American parents reported high parental expectations on academic performance, moral development, and career choice, with slightly different expectations for their boys and girls. Strict family rules were also reported, in particular regarding monitoring and control on their adolescent child’s peer selection and computer use. Differences in parenting styles between mothers and fathers were found, with fathers generally being stricter than mothers. Parents expressed the concerns about challenges in communicating effectively with their adolescent children due to their different cultural values, which in turn increases conflicts between parents and their adolescent children. These parenting factors are found to be associated with Chinese American adolescents’ psychosocial health. Implications: Chinese American parents may find it challenging to discipline their adolescent children within a different culture context. Linguistically and culturally tailored resources (e.g., parent support groups, programs aimed at improving parent-child communication) may enhance parenting skills and consequently reduce emotional distress in their adolescent children. 
Keywords:
Chinese American; Parenting styles; Adolescents; Psychosocial health
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4909
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titlePARENTING AND CHINESE AMERICAN ADOLESCENTS' PSYCHOSOCIAL HEALTH: VOICES FROM PARENTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211696-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This qualitative study aimed to gain an in-depth understanding of Chinese American parents’ parenting styles and how parenting styles might influence adolescents’ psychosocial health. Background: Asian Americans are one of the fastest growing minority groups in the U.S., with the Chinese being the largest group. While the model minority perception of Asian Americans persists, evidence suggests that Asian American adolescents experience higher levels of depressive symptoms than their same-gender White counterparts. Quantitative findings suggest associations between parenting factors (e.g., parental control, monitoring) and Chinese American youth’s mental health. A qualitative understanding regarding Chinese American parents’ parenting styles and their relationship with youth’s psychosocial health is warranted. Methods: The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 13 Chinese American adolescents’ parents (10 mothers and 3 fathers) through Chinese schools and churches in a southwest metropolitan area. Four focus groups were conducted in the participants’ preferred language: English or Chinese. Group discussions were held in a safe room (60-90 minutes each) and were audiotaped with permission. Demographic characteristics, immigration history, and acculturation data were obtained in a survey (available in English and two Chinese written versions: traditional and simplified). Two investigators independently conducted a qualitative analysis of the transcribed transcripts and summarized the findings using an 8-step content analysis method (Downe-Wamboldt, 1992). Descriptive statistics were calculated for all measures in the quantitative survey. Results: The 13 participants were ages 35 to 56 years old (M = 48; SD = 5.8). One parent (7.7%) was U.S. born, and one came to the U.S. before age 18.  Most parents (n=12, 92.3%) held a bachelor’s degree or higher; they worked as professionals such as engineers (23.1%), accountants (15.4%), or teachers (15.4%). Ten (76.9%) parents reported using Chinese when speaking to their children, and two (15.3%) only used English. Most (n=11, 84.6%) parents identified themselves as speaking and understanding English moderately or very well. They reported higher Chinese orientation scores (M = 30.0; SD =4.9) than U. S. orientation scores (M = 25.1; SD = 3.7). Four themes were generated from the focus groups data. Chinese American parents reported high parental expectations on academic performance, moral development, and career choice, with slightly different expectations for their boys and girls. Strict family rules were also reported, in particular regarding monitoring and control on their adolescent child’s peer selection and computer use. Differences in parenting styles between mothers and fathers were found, with fathers generally being stricter than mothers. Parents expressed the concerns about challenges in communicating effectively with their adolescent children due to their different cultural values, which in turn increases conflicts between parents and their adolescent children. These parenting factors are found to be associated with Chinese American adolescents’ psychosocial health. Implications: Chinese American parents may find it challenging to discipline their adolescent children within a different culture context. Linguistically and culturally tailored resources (e.g., parent support groups, programs aimed at improving parent-child communication) may enhance parenting skills and consequently reduce emotional distress in their adolescent children. en_GB
dc.subjectChinese Americanen_GB
dc.subjectParenting stylesen_GB
dc.subjectAdolescentsen_GB
dc.subjectPsychosocial healthen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:09:00Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:09:00Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:09:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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