DISCOVERING STUDENTS' PERCEPTIONS OF COLLEGE AND HEALTH CAREERS USING PHOTOVOICE

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211699
Type:
Research Study
Title:
DISCOVERING STUDENTS' PERCEPTIONS OF COLLEGE AND HEALTH CAREERS USING PHOTOVOICE
Abstract:
Primary Aim: To identify disadvantaged high school students’ perceptions about going to college, a career in nursing, and health sciences. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Increasing the numbers of disadvantaged and ethnically diverse students in nursing and health science careers is nationally a work in progress. It continues to demand innovative and effective solutions. To date, research on recruitment and retention to increase diversity has emphasized the need for financial aid, academic preparation, and emotional support. These are important endeavors, but what may be missing are the voices and perceptions of the students. Creative research is needed to help understand, articulate, and act on barriers students perceive as keeping them from obtaining degrees. Working with students can lead to effective community based interventions to make a difference in increasing the diversity of the nation’s health care workforce. Photovoice was chosen for this study of disadvantaged high school students because it allows marginalized groups the opportunity to voice their concerns and opinions in a safe and non-threatening environment. Methods: This phenomenological study used a descriptive qualitative design with photovoice. High school students attending a two-week summer residency program to prepare for college and health sciences careers were recruited for the study. Study participants were encouraged to photograph people, places, and things that conveyed their perspectives on problems and strengths related to going to college and health/nursing professions. Students presented their photos in small focus groups facilitated by undergraduate and graduate students using the mnemonic SHOWeD: What do you See here? What’s really Happening here? Data analysis began with identifying exclusive and exhaustive categories for open and axial coding. Coding began in focus groups as participants and researchers engaged in a process of capturing, discussing, and thematizing photographs. Results: Forty-five high school students, 20 Native American, 25 Hispanic, 1 African American, 1 Pacific Islander, and 3 White, participated in the study. Themes included: Recognizing the university is large, I am small; Needing to transition from high school and home to college; Becoming independent; and Overcoming bad times. Students’ photographs included the obstacle ropes course activity to show ability to overcome difficulties, parking signs to indicate external limitations, and a spider eating a fly to indicate good and bad times. Overall students indicated growing awareness of themselves within a larger system and the need to face difficulties to progress to college and a health career. Implications: Nursing and health sciences educators need to continue helping students increase academic skills and financial aid, but students at the high school level also need support making their way from the known home environment to the unknown college environment. The use of photovoice in this study resulted in participant reflection. Reflection and growing self-awareness may motivate participants to change and succeed by enabling them to understand the world from new and thought-provoking perspectives. Funding: HRSA Workforce Diversity Grant # DP19HP19023; NIH/IHS NARCH Grant U26IHS300291/01
Keywords:
Students; Higher education
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4439
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleDISCOVERING STUDENTS' PERCEPTIONS OF COLLEGE AND HEALTH CAREERS USING PHOTOVOICEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211699-
dc.description.abstractPrimary Aim: To identify disadvantaged high school students’ perceptions about going to college, a career in nursing, and health sciences. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Increasing the numbers of disadvantaged and ethnically diverse students in nursing and health science careers is nationally a work in progress. It continues to demand innovative and effective solutions. To date, research on recruitment and retention to increase diversity has emphasized the need for financial aid, academic preparation, and emotional support. These are important endeavors, but what may be missing are the voices and perceptions of the students. Creative research is needed to help understand, articulate, and act on barriers students perceive as keeping them from obtaining degrees. Working with students can lead to effective community based interventions to make a difference in increasing the diversity of the nation’s health care workforce. Photovoice was chosen for this study of disadvantaged high school students because it allows marginalized groups the opportunity to voice their concerns and opinions in a safe and non-threatening environment. Methods: This phenomenological study used a descriptive qualitative design with photovoice. High school students attending a two-week summer residency program to prepare for college and health sciences careers were recruited for the study. Study participants were encouraged to photograph people, places, and things that conveyed their perspectives on problems and strengths related to going to college and health/nursing professions. Students presented their photos in small focus groups facilitated by undergraduate and graduate students using the mnemonic SHOWeD: What do you See here? What’s really Happening here? Data analysis began with identifying exclusive and exhaustive categories for open and axial coding. Coding began in focus groups as participants and researchers engaged in a process of capturing, discussing, and thematizing photographs. Results: Forty-five high school students, 20 Native American, 25 Hispanic, 1 African American, 1 Pacific Islander, and 3 White, participated in the study. Themes included: Recognizing the university is large, I am small; Needing to transition from high school and home to college; Becoming independent; and Overcoming bad times. Students’ photographs included the obstacle ropes course activity to show ability to overcome difficulties, parking signs to indicate external limitations, and a spider eating a fly to indicate good and bad times. Overall students indicated growing awareness of themselves within a larger system and the need to face difficulties to progress to college and a health career. Implications: Nursing and health sciences educators need to continue helping students increase academic skills and financial aid, but students at the high school level also need support making their way from the known home environment to the unknown college environment. The use of photovoice in this study resulted in participant reflection. Reflection and growing self-awareness may motivate participants to change and succeed by enabling them to understand the world from new and thought-provoking perspectives. Funding: HRSA Workforce Diversity Grant # DP19HP19023; NIH/IHS NARCH Grant U26IHS300291/01en_GB
dc.subjectStudentsen_GB
dc.subjectHigher educationen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:09:11Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:09:11Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:09:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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