2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211704
Type:
Research Study
Title:
CHALLENGES OF LIVING WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES: CHILDREN/ADOLESCENT PERSPECTIVES
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to discover challenges identified by children/adolescents with diabetes (CWD) during focus group sessions. Background: Type 1 diabetes requires lifestyle changes involving diet modification, blood glucose monitoring, carbohydrate counting, and insulin administration. When children are young, parents manage their diet, glucose monitoring, and insuling administration, However, as children grow older, self-management skills become important. Learning self-care and developing positive attitudes toward diabetes management can improve glucose management and promote long-term benefits. Therefore, understanding CWD’s challenges as they learn to manage diabetes themselves is an important first step in improving diabetes outcomes for this age group. Methods: The project was part of a larger study in which parents, siblings and CWD participated in focus groups, a type of participatory action research that combine interviewing and open discussion of common issues. Six separate focus groups were held over a four month period with a total of fourteen CWD participating (9 males and 5 females, who ranged in age from 7 years to 16 years with a mean age of 9.08 years). The focus group discussions were audio recorded and then transcribed verbatim. The transcriptions were analyzed for common themes according to qualitative methodology. Results: Three themes emerged after analyzing transcripts from the focus groups that embody challenges CWD faced: 1) dealing with low blood glucose; 2) checking blood glucose and administering insulin; and 3) feeling different and/or alone. The challenge of dealing with low blood glucose included identifying low glucose, having help when they had low glucose levels, and avoiding or being prepared for activities that caused low blood sugar. Challenges of checking blood glucose levels included enduring physical pain, dealing with the inconvenience of checking blood glucose and administering insulin, and being tempted to eat something without checking or administering insulin. Blood glucose and insulin management made CWD feel different because of increased parental involvement at school, overprotective peers, and not knowing anyone else who had diabetes. Participants also identified the need to interact with other CWD in settings that normalized glucose monitoring and insulin administration so they didn’t feel alone. Conclusions: Data indicated diabetes is challenging for CWD. It is important that nurses and health care providers discuss the challenges of diabetes with their CWD, listen to their concerns, and work with them to develop strategies to promote health, minimize complications, and reduce or eliminate feeling different or alone. Nurses and health care providers can also assist parents in understanding their CWD concerns and challenges so they can promote improved diabetes management and health outcomes.
Keywords:
Juvenile diabetes; Challenges
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4932
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleCHALLENGES OF LIVING WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES: CHILDREN/ADOLESCENT PERSPECTIVESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211704-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to discover challenges identified by children/adolescents with diabetes (CWD) during focus group sessions. Background: Type 1 diabetes requires lifestyle changes involving diet modification, blood glucose monitoring, carbohydrate counting, and insulin administration. When children are young, parents manage their diet, glucose monitoring, and insuling administration, However, as children grow older, self-management skills become important. Learning self-care and developing positive attitudes toward diabetes management can improve glucose management and promote long-term benefits. Therefore, understanding CWD’s challenges as they learn to manage diabetes themselves is an important first step in improving diabetes outcomes for this age group. Methods: The project was part of a larger study in which parents, siblings and CWD participated in focus groups, a type of participatory action research that combine interviewing and open discussion of common issues. Six separate focus groups were held over a four month period with a total of fourteen CWD participating (9 males and 5 females, who ranged in age from 7 years to 16 years with a mean age of 9.08 years). The focus group discussions were audio recorded and then transcribed verbatim. The transcriptions were analyzed for common themes according to qualitative methodology. Results: Three themes emerged after analyzing transcripts from the focus groups that embody challenges CWD faced: 1) dealing with low blood glucose; 2) checking blood glucose and administering insulin; and 3) feeling different and/or alone. The challenge of dealing with low blood glucose included identifying low glucose, having help when they had low glucose levels, and avoiding or being prepared for activities that caused low blood sugar. Challenges of checking blood glucose levels included enduring physical pain, dealing with the inconvenience of checking blood glucose and administering insulin, and being tempted to eat something without checking or administering insulin. Blood glucose and insulin management made CWD feel different because of increased parental involvement at school, overprotective peers, and not knowing anyone else who had diabetes. Participants also identified the need to interact with other CWD in settings that normalized glucose monitoring and insulin administration so they didn’t feel alone. Conclusions: Data indicated diabetes is challenging for CWD. It is important that nurses and health care providers discuss the challenges of diabetes with their CWD, listen to their concerns, and work with them to develop strategies to promote health, minimize complications, and reduce or eliminate feeling different or alone. Nurses and health care providers can also assist parents in understanding their CWD concerns and challenges so they can promote improved diabetes management and health outcomes.en_GB
dc.subjectJuvenile diabetesen_GB
dc.subjectChallengesen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:09:25Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:09:25Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:09:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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