2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211706
Type:
Research Study
Title:
PROTEOMICS AS BIOMARKERS IN SLEEP DISTURBANCE
Abstract:
Purpose: This purpose of this symposium is to provide: 1) an overview of proteomics; 2) urine proteomics findings in pediatric sleep disordered breathing; 3) challenges and procedural considerations in collection of urine proteins. Background:  There is a critical need for cheaper, quicker, and child-friendly tool for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).  Characteristics of OSA including gas exchange abnormalities accompanied by sleep fragmentation and deprivation open a new opportunity to identify specific biomarkers that accompany the presence of OSA.  Development of noninvasive biomarkers in the urine capable of distinguishing children with primary snoring from those with obstructive sleep apnea would facilitate timely screening and diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea in children.  Urine proteomic strategies are a noninvasive approach that may permit the identification of biomarkers linked to disease etiology and pathophysiologic mechanisms that reliably screen for obstructive sleep apnea. Methods:  Proteomics involves the analysis of cellular proteins with mass spectrometry based techniques, image analysis, amino acid sequencing, or reverse-phase protein array to identify and quantify a large number of proteins.  Two popular methods of protein quantification include one or two dimensional gel electrophoresis with mass spectrometry that separate protein spot intensities on gels, and shotgun proteomics that involves a mixture of proteins digested into peptides that are analyzed by mass spectrometry to identify the proteins from which they were derived. Implications: Advances in mass spectrometry have allowed researchers to identify low and high abundant proteins in complex mixtures. In spite of the development of shotgun proteomic approaches, comprehensive proteome coverage remains a challenge due to the expense of assays, variability among urine samples urine composition (pH, creatinine concentrations), diet, and exercise. As a result there is continual research into improved methods for separation of peptides, mass spectrometry systems and data analysis tools.  Many promising biomarker candidates in pediatric sleep research (uromodulin, urocortin, kalikretin) are in the “discovery” stage and still need verification with follow up studies.  Advances in proteomic biomarkers provide new opportunities to conduct research studies with banked and fresh urine to benefit diagnosis, response to therapeutic interventions, and evaluate outcomes in sleep disorder research.
Keywords:
Proteomics; Pediatric sleep disordered breathing
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4936
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titlePROTEOMICS AS BIOMARKERS IN SLEEP DISTURBANCEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211706-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This purpose of this symposium is to provide: 1) an overview of proteomics; 2) urine proteomics findings in pediatric sleep disordered breathing; 3) challenges and procedural considerations in collection of urine proteins. Background:  There is a critical need for cheaper, quicker, and child-friendly tool for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).  Characteristics of OSA including gas exchange abnormalities accompanied by sleep fragmentation and deprivation open a new opportunity to identify specific biomarkers that accompany the presence of OSA.  Development of noninvasive biomarkers in the urine capable of distinguishing children with primary snoring from those with obstructive sleep apnea would facilitate timely screening and diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea in children.  Urine proteomic strategies are a noninvasive approach that may permit the identification of biomarkers linked to disease etiology and pathophysiologic mechanisms that reliably screen for obstructive sleep apnea. Methods:  Proteomics involves the analysis of cellular proteins with mass spectrometry based techniques, image analysis, amino acid sequencing, or reverse-phase protein array to identify and quantify a large number of proteins.  Two popular methods of protein quantification include one or two dimensional gel electrophoresis with mass spectrometry that separate protein spot intensities on gels, and shotgun proteomics that involves a mixture of proteins digested into peptides that are analyzed by mass spectrometry to identify the proteins from which they were derived. Implications: Advances in mass spectrometry have allowed researchers to identify low and high abundant proteins in complex mixtures. In spite of the development of shotgun proteomic approaches, comprehensive proteome coverage remains a challenge due to the expense of assays, variability among urine samples urine composition (pH, creatinine concentrations), diet, and exercise. As a result there is continual research into improved methods for separation of peptides, mass spectrometry systems and data analysis tools.  Many promising biomarker candidates in pediatric sleep research (uromodulin, urocortin, kalikretin) are in the “discovery” stage and still need verification with follow up studies.  Advances in proteomic biomarkers provide new opportunities to conduct research studies with banked and fresh urine to benefit diagnosis, response to therapeutic interventions, and evaluate outcomes in sleep disorder research.en_GB
dc.subjectProteomicsen_GB
dc.subjectPediatric sleep disordered breathingen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:09:32Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:09:32Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:09:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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