19.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211710
Type:
Research Study
Title:
CALLING IN AT WORK: NURSING CELL PHONE POLICIES IN ACUTE CARE
Abstract:
Purpose/Aim: The purpose of this research study was to explore nursing policy related to cell phone use in California acute care settings. Understanding how agencies are handling nurse cell phone use at work is a first step in the process of determining how to best integrate communication technology in health care settings. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: The use of cell phones and other wireless devices is prevalent in today’s society, especially among the younger generation. Since the 2000 IOM report, the use of electronic communication within the healthcare setting has grown rapidly. There are informal reports that cell phone use by nursing staff is an issue in acute care settings, yet there is very little literature on the development of any policies on this issue, and nursing cell phone use in acute settings has not been formally studied. Methods: A 12-item online survey asking about nursing cell phone use in California acute care settings was e-mailed to 963 Association of California Nurse Leaders participants through the North Central Association of California Nurse Leaders chapter. The survey collected information on the respondents’ general demographics, the category of institution in which they work, and the institutions’ policies on cell phone use by nurses within that institution.  The participants had the opportunity to add any comments they wished to the survey. The survey questions included multiple choice and open ended responses related to respondent/institution demographics, cell phone policy, enforcement, and challenges. Results: The response rate was 23 percent (N=217).  Most of the responses came from southern California.  Responders were primarily Department Directors or Chief Nursing Officers in inpatient hospitals. The primary categories of concern identified were “distraction, “making personal calls from patient rooms,” and confidentiality issues.  In the text accompanying those responses, the primary themes were “professionalism” and “confidentiality.”  Almost three-fourths of hospitals surveyed had policies, but these policies were variably enforced. Many participants acknowledged the utility of cell phones in clinical practice for such things as looking up medication information, lab information, and disease information. Implications: This survey highlights the concern of nurse managers about the impact of cell phone use by nursing personnel. These concerns center on professionalism and confidentiality.  Policies, however, are varied and enforcement is difficult.  The challenge highlighted in this study is to devise policies that allow professional and intelligent use of technologies such as cell phones while protecting nursing’s professional image and the rights of patients to confidentiality.  This is an achievable goal.  Future studies can use this background to explore ways to achieve that balance.
Keywords:
Nursing policy; Cell phone use; Acute care settings
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4944
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleCALLING IN AT WORK: NURSING CELL PHONE POLICIES IN ACUTE CAREen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211710-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aim: The purpose of this research study was to explore nursing policy related to cell phone use in California acute care settings. Understanding how agencies are handling nurse cell phone use at work is a first step in the process of determining how to best integrate communication technology in health care settings. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: The use of cell phones and other wireless devices is prevalent in today’s society, especially among the younger generation. Since the 2000 IOM report, the use of electronic communication within the healthcare setting has grown rapidly. There are informal reports that cell phone use by nursing staff is an issue in acute care settings, yet there is very little literature on the development of any policies on this issue, and nursing cell phone use in acute settings has not been formally studied. Methods: A 12-item online survey asking about nursing cell phone use in California acute care settings was e-mailed to 963 Association of California Nurse Leaders participants through the North Central Association of California Nurse Leaders chapter. The survey collected information on the respondents’ general demographics, the category of institution in which they work, and the institutions’ policies on cell phone use by nurses within that institution.  The participants had the opportunity to add any comments they wished to the survey. The survey questions included multiple choice and open ended responses related to respondent/institution demographics, cell phone policy, enforcement, and challenges. Results: The response rate was 23 percent (N=217).  Most of the responses came from southern California.  Responders were primarily Department Directors or Chief Nursing Officers in inpatient hospitals. The primary categories of concern identified were “distraction, “making personal calls from patient rooms,” and confidentiality issues.  In the text accompanying those responses, the primary themes were “professionalism” and “confidentiality.”  Almost three-fourths of hospitals surveyed had policies, but these policies were variably enforced. Many participants acknowledged the utility of cell phones in clinical practice for such things as looking up medication information, lab information, and disease information. Implications: This survey highlights the concern of nurse managers about the impact of cell phone use by nursing personnel. These concerns center on professionalism and confidentiality.  Policies, however, are varied and enforcement is difficult.  The challenge highlighted in this study is to devise policies that allow professional and intelligent use of technologies such as cell phones while protecting nursing’s professional image and the rights of patients to confidentiality.  This is an achievable goal.  Future studies can use this background to explore ways to achieve that balance.en_GB
dc.subjectNursing policyen_GB
dc.subjectCell phone useen_GB
dc.subjectAcute care settingsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:09:46Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:09:46Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:09:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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