2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211713
Type:
Research Study
Title:
MEASURING RELATIONAL HEALTH IN YOUNG WOMEN IN TREATMENT FOR SUBSTANCE ABUSE
Abstract:
Measurement of components of relational health for young women in treatment for substance abuse may be useful to assess treatment needs and progress. Such an instrument was used in this multi-method study that focused on relational health in adolescent women in in-patient chemical dependency treatment. The importance of relationships and “connectedness” as protective for aberrant behavior has been validated extensively in the literature of several disciplines over the past decade. Less well described are the components and qualities of connectedness or relational engagement among adolescents involved in substance abuse treatment. How relationships affect SU treatment success remains unclear. This multi-method exploratory study analyzed the nature of relational health among 16-17 year old girls enrolled in an inpatient substance abuse treatment program compared with a group of 16-17 year old girls attending high school in the same community as the treatment center. Aims included: 1) Assess the usefulness of the Relational Health Indices (RHI)  in measuring differences between groups in three dimensions (engagement, authenticity, empowerment/zest) and three domains (mentor, friend, community) of supportive relationships; 2) Determine common patterns and meanings of relational experiences of 16-17 year old girls in SU treatment, from in-depth hermeneutic interviews; and 3) Generate a comprehensive analysis of the dimensions, domains, patterns and meanings of supportive relationships among 16-17 year old girls in SU treatment, comparing selected findings. Multiple analytic methods corroborated and enriched our findings. The purpose for THIS presentation is to discuss the results of the comparative analyses of dimensions and domains using the RHI (Aim #1). Differences between treatment and community groups were significant in several areas, including family structure, number and quality of mentoring relationships, and quality of peer relationships, implying the need for focused attention in these areas. The RHI also pointed to differences in aspects of relational health between admission and discharge from the treatment facility, emphasizing the need for establishing strong mentor and peer relationships during treatment that can be extended post discharge. The RHI tool, originally developed and modified by Liang and colleagues (2002) provided information that can inform interventions targeted to specific dimensions and domains of relational health for young women in chemical dependency treatment. Challenges to using the RHI in community treatment programs will be discussed, as well as ways in which survey instruments used in multi-method designs can add to comprehensive understandings.
Keywords:
Young women; Substance Abuse
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4948
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleMEASURING RELATIONAL HEALTH IN YOUNG WOMEN IN TREATMENT FOR SUBSTANCE ABUSEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211713-
dc.description.abstractMeasurement of components of relational health for young women in treatment for substance abuse may be useful to assess treatment needs and progress. Such an instrument was used in this multi-method study that focused on relational health in adolescent women in in-patient chemical dependency treatment. The importance of relationships and “connectedness” as protective for aberrant behavior has been validated extensively in the literature of several disciplines over the past decade. Less well described are the components and qualities of connectedness or relational engagement among adolescents involved in substance abuse treatment. How relationships affect SU treatment success remains unclear. This multi-method exploratory study analyzed the nature of relational health among 16-17 year old girls enrolled in an inpatient substance abuse treatment program compared with a group of 16-17 year old girls attending high school in the same community as the treatment center. Aims included: 1) Assess the usefulness of the Relational Health Indices (RHI)  in measuring differences between groups in three dimensions (engagement, authenticity, empowerment/zest) and three domains (mentor, friend, community) of supportive relationships; 2) Determine common patterns and meanings of relational experiences of 16-17 year old girls in SU treatment, from in-depth hermeneutic interviews; and 3) Generate a comprehensive analysis of the dimensions, domains, patterns and meanings of supportive relationships among 16-17 year old girls in SU treatment, comparing selected findings. Multiple analytic methods corroborated and enriched our findings. The purpose for THIS presentation is to discuss the results of the comparative analyses of dimensions and domains using the RHI (Aim #1). Differences between treatment and community groups were significant in several areas, including family structure, number and quality of mentoring relationships, and quality of peer relationships, implying the need for focused attention in these areas. The RHI also pointed to differences in aspects of relational health between admission and discharge from the treatment facility, emphasizing the need for establishing strong mentor and peer relationships during treatment that can be extended post discharge. The RHI tool, originally developed and modified by Liang and colleagues (2002) provided information that can inform interventions targeted to specific dimensions and domains of relational health for young women in chemical dependency treatment. Challenges to using the RHI in community treatment programs will be discussed, as well as ways in which survey instruments used in multi-method designs can add to comprehensive understandings.en_GB
dc.subjectYoung womenen_GB
dc.subjectSubstance Abuseen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:09:58Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:09:58Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:09:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.