KOREAN AMERICAN PARENTS' EVALUATION OF PARENTING STRETEGIES RECOMMENDED IN THE US

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211715
Type:
Research Study
Title:
KOREAN AMERICAN PARENTS' EVALUATION OF PARENTING STRETEGIES RECOMMENDED IN THE US
Abstract:
Background: Most of the parenting programs in the United States are originally developed for Americans who understand American culture and common American parenting strategies. Therefore, these training programs may not accurately reflect ethnic minority parents’ culture or their parenting due to different cultural backgrounds. Therefore, when pilot-testing standardized parenting programs with minority populations, it is important to examine parents’ perceptions of the specific parenting strategies in addition to measuring effectiveness and evaluating the cultural and linguistic appropriateness of the program delivery. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore 21 Korean American parents’ perceptions of effective parenting strategies in the U.S. taught in a standardized parenting program. Methods: Interview data using open-ended questions were audio taped, transcribed, and analyzed using content analysis. Results: Themes that emerged were: evaluation of the effective parenting strategies, changes in parenting strategies, and perceived effects on children. The findings indicate that Korean American parents perceived the strategies as based on Western cultural background. However, parents thought that playing, praising, using sticker charts, ignoring, and using timeouts were effective. Learning specific ways of using each strategy successfully was particularly helpful. After the program, they perceived that these strategies were useful for them in regulating their emotions, becoming more patient and consistent, and thinking from their child’s perspective, which increased their self-efficacy and intimacy with their children. They also perceived that their children increased their self-confidence, self-expression, and compliance. Implications: Healthcare providers and school teachers can use this study’s findings to better educate Korean American parents. For example, when healthcare providers teach timeouts to immigrant parents, they would need to mention not only when to use them but also how to use them in specific way. It would be good to provide written instructions. These findings can also be used to develop a culturally and linguistically competent parenting program for Korean American parents.
Keywords:
Parenting programs; Ethnic minority
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4964
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleKOREAN AMERICAN PARENTS' EVALUATION OF PARENTING STRETEGIES RECOMMENDED IN THE USen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211715-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Most of the parenting programs in the United States are originally developed for Americans who understand American culture and common American parenting strategies. Therefore, these training programs may not accurately reflect ethnic minority parents’ culture or their parenting due to different cultural backgrounds. Therefore, when pilot-testing standardized parenting programs with minority populations, it is important to examine parents’ perceptions of the specific parenting strategies in addition to measuring effectiveness and evaluating the cultural and linguistic appropriateness of the program delivery. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore 21 Korean American parents’ perceptions of effective parenting strategies in the U.S. taught in a standardized parenting program. Methods: Interview data using open-ended questions were audio taped, transcribed, and analyzed using content analysis. Results: Themes that emerged were: evaluation of the effective parenting strategies, changes in parenting strategies, and perceived effects on children. The findings indicate that Korean American parents perceived the strategies as based on Western cultural background. However, parents thought that playing, praising, using sticker charts, ignoring, and using timeouts were effective. Learning specific ways of using each strategy successfully was particularly helpful. After the program, they perceived that these strategies were useful for them in regulating their emotions, becoming more patient and consistent, and thinking from their child’s perspective, which increased their self-efficacy and intimacy with their children. They also perceived that their children increased their self-confidence, self-expression, and compliance. Implications: Healthcare providers and school teachers can use this study’s findings to better educate Korean American parents. For example, when healthcare providers teach timeouts to immigrant parents, they would need to mention not only when to use them but also how to use them in specific way. It would be good to provide written instructions. These findings can also be used to develop a culturally and linguistically competent parenting program for Korean American parents.en_GB
dc.subjectParenting programsen_GB
dc.subjectEthnic minorityen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:10:05Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:10:05Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:10:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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