2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211716
Type:
Research Study
Title:
THE LIVED EXPERIENCE OF MENARCHE in NEPALESE ADOLESCENTS:
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experiences of adolescents from a Nepalese culture, residing in Northern California, between the ages of 13 to 16 years, regarding cultural practices related to their menarche and menstrual cycles.  These participants had knowledge of what the menarche experience was like for girls in Nepal and for girls recently emigrated from Nepal who live in a traditional house hold. Background: Puberty is a transitional period between childhood and adulthood, during which a growth spurt occurs, secondary sexual characteristics appear, fertility is achieved, and profound psychological changes take place. Girls entering puberty where traditional Nepalese culture is practiced have extraordinary challenges. Method: The phenomenological study design was used to explore the lived experiences of cultural practice during menarche and menstrual cycles in adolescents.  Unstructured interviews took place in each girl’s home.  Institutional review was granted.  Both parental consent and participant assent was obtained. Findings: The themes revealed from this study were the following:  1) emotional roller coaster about first menstrual period; 2) dealing with negativity while trying to be true to cultural values; 3) trying to balance the differences between traditional and modern customs; 4) cultural confusion: mixed messages from friends/family/elders 5) rationale behind cultural taboos does not help lessen the confusion or pain 6) information mis-match between Nepal and the US, and 7) looking forward: challenging the older way. Implications: This study provides guidance for nurses and other health care personnel to have a more clear understanding of the experience of menarche within context of traditional Nepalese culture.  Health care professionals can use the data from this study to provide more culturally sensitive care and to be aware of potentially harmful practices such as re-using menstrual cloths without properly washing and drying.  The cultural practices in Nepal could be improved through encouraging females to keep clean, to take daily baths and change their underclothes frequently when soiled. The school curriculum in Nepal would benefit from having a requirement for classes on puberty and sex education.  Education for the parents, grand-parents, teachers, adolescents and community is necessary regarding normal menstrual cycle and proper care during menstrual cycle.
Keywords:
Menstrual cycle; Cultural practices
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4983
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleTHE LIVED EXPERIENCE OF MENARCHE in NEPALESE ADOLESCENTS:en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211716-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experiences of adolescents from a Nepalese culture, residing in Northern California, between the ages of 13 to 16 years, regarding cultural practices related to their menarche and menstrual cycles.  These participants had knowledge of what the menarche experience was like for girls in Nepal and for girls recently emigrated from Nepal who live in a traditional house hold. Background: Puberty is a transitional period between childhood and adulthood, during which a growth spurt occurs, secondary sexual characteristics appear, fertility is achieved, and profound psychological changes take place. Girls entering puberty where traditional Nepalese culture is practiced have extraordinary challenges. Method: The phenomenological study design was used to explore the lived experiences of cultural practice during menarche and menstrual cycles in adolescents.  Unstructured interviews took place in each girl’s home.  Institutional review was granted.  Both parental consent and participant assent was obtained. Findings: The themes revealed from this study were the following:  1) emotional roller coaster about first menstrual period; 2) dealing with negativity while trying to be true to cultural values; 3) trying to balance the differences between traditional and modern customs; 4) cultural confusion: mixed messages from friends/family/elders 5) rationale behind cultural taboos does not help lessen the confusion or pain 6) information mis-match between Nepal and the US, and 7) looking forward: challenging the older way. Implications: This study provides guidance for nurses and other health care personnel to have a more clear understanding of the experience of menarche within context of traditional Nepalese culture.  Health care professionals can use the data from this study to provide more culturally sensitive care and to be aware of potentially harmful practices such as re-using menstrual cloths without properly washing and drying.  The cultural practices in Nepal could be improved through encouraging females to keep clean, to take daily baths and change their underclothes frequently when soiled. The school curriculum in Nepal would benefit from having a requirement for classes on puberty and sex education.  Education for the parents, grand-parents, teachers, adolescents and community is necessary regarding normal menstrual cycle and proper care during menstrual cycle.en_GB
dc.subjectMenstrual cycleen_GB
dc.subjectCultural practicesen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:10:08Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:10:08Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:10:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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