2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211717
Type:
Research Study
Title:
DETERMINANTS OF HOSPITAL NURSE INTENTION TO REMAIN EMPLOYED
Abstract:
AIM: To report on findings of a large Canadian study that examined factors influencing hospital nurse intention to remain employed, as well as identify generational cohort strategies to promote nurse intention to remain employed. BACKGROUND: Despite current economic conditions, a shortage of registered nurses persists and continues to increase as a result of retirement, voluntary early separation of nurses, and nurse migration to other countries. According to the Canadian Nurses Association (2009), by 2022, there will be an undersupply of 60,000 registered nurses in Canada. If not addressed, this problem will give further incentive to replace registered nurses with other less qualified personnel, regardless of the consequences to patient and organizational outcomes. METHODS: Based on focus group findings, a survey was developed to test a hypothesized model of determinants of hospital nurse intention to remain employed. The survey was mailed to 9,904 Canadian registered nurses. Completed surveys were received from 4,024 nurses. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize model variables. The hypothesized model was tested and refined using structural equation modelling analyses. RESULTS: The longer the period of time into the future and the younger the generational cohort, the less likely were nurses intending to remain employed in hospitals. The final structural model had very acceptable fit indices. Four nurse-reported influencing factors had direct only impact on intention to remain employed: outside opportunities, scheduling satisfaction, emotional exhaustion burnout, and amount of non-nursing workload. Five nurse-reported influencing factors had both direct and indirect impact on intention to remain employed: having dependents to care for, staffing and resource adequacy, overall health, work-supported empowerment, and work life quality. Twelve nurse-reported influencing factors had indirect only effects on nurse intention to remain employed: perceived organizational support, salary and benefits satisfaction, physical environment, professional practice environment, psychological empowerment, workplace fairness, quality of manager-nurse relationship, leader support, work group communication, work group cohesion, nurse-physician collaboration, and workplace bullying and incivility. IMPLICATIONS: Findings suggest that some of the most important factors influencing nurse intention to remain employed may not be easily modifiable (e.g., outside opportunities). Yet, many influencing factors are modifiable (e.g., emotional exhaustion, empowerment, workload). All three generational cohorts identified the same five top priorities for encouraging them to remain employed including having a reasonable workload, manageable nurse-patient ratios, and a supportive manager.
Keywords:
Nursing profession; Employment trends
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4985
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleDETERMINANTS OF HOSPITAL NURSE INTENTION TO REMAIN EMPLOYEDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211717-
dc.description.abstractAIM: To report on findings of a large Canadian study that examined factors influencing hospital nurse intention to remain employed, as well as identify generational cohort strategies to promote nurse intention to remain employed. BACKGROUND: Despite current economic conditions, a shortage of registered nurses persists and continues to increase as a result of retirement, voluntary early separation of nurses, and nurse migration to other countries. According to the Canadian Nurses Association (2009), by 2022, there will be an undersupply of 60,000 registered nurses in Canada. If not addressed, this problem will give further incentive to replace registered nurses with other less qualified personnel, regardless of the consequences to patient and organizational outcomes. METHODS: Based on focus group findings, a survey was developed to test a hypothesized model of determinants of hospital nurse intention to remain employed. The survey was mailed to 9,904 Canadian registered nurses. Completed surveys were received from 4,024 nurses. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize model variables. The hypothesized model was tested and refined using structural equation modelling analyses. RESULTS: The longer the period of time into the future and the younger the generational cohort, the less likely were nurses intending to remain employed in hospitals. The final structural model had very acceptable fit indices. Four nurse-reported influencing factors had direct only impact on intention to remain employed: outside opportunities, scheduling satisfaction, emotional exhaustion burnout, and amount of non-nursing workload. Five nurse-reported influencing factors had both direct and indirect impact on intention to remain employed: having dependents to care for, staffing and resource adequacy, overall health, work-supported empowerment, and work life quality. Twelve nurse-reported influencing factors had indirect only effects on nurse intention to remain employed: perceived organizational support, salary and benefits satisfaction, physical environment, professional practice environment, psychological empowerment, workplace fairness, quality of manager-nurse relationship, leader support, work group communication, work group cohesion, nurse-physician collaboration, and workplace bullying and incivility. IMPLICATIONS: Findings suggest that some of the most important factors influencing nurse intention to remain employed may not be easily modifiable (e.g., outside opportunities). Yet, many influencing factors are modifiable (e.g., emotional exhaustion, empowerment, workload). All three generational cohorts identified the same five top priorities for encouraging them to remain employed including having a reasonable workload, manageable nurse-patient ratios, and a supportive manager.en_GB
dc.subjectNursing professionen_GB
dc.subjectEmployment trendsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:10:12Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:10:12Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:10:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.