2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211718
Type:
Research Study
Title:
DEVELOPMENT OF A TOOL TO MEASURE MEMBER SATISFACTION WITH A PSYCH-SOCIAL CLUB
Abstract:
Purpose: This poster focuses on the development of the Benefits & Satisfaction Tool for Members of a Psych-social Club (B&ST-MPC).  The specific aims of the tool are three-fold: 1) exploration of what brought members to the club, 2) determination of ways the program benefits its members and 3) determination of what other services can be provided by the club. This poster addresses the second aim. Background. The mental health service (MHS) continuum is dependent on regional centres and community services. One such service model is the psych-social club which potentially reduces the utilization of costly in-patient services. However, validation by persons with serious mental illness regarding the benefits of and satisfaction with attending a club is needed.  Qualitative analysis of data from an earlier mixed methods study with psych-social club members supported the discovery of six healthy benefits.  These were crafted into 18 items measuring perceived benefits of attending a psych-social club; possible responses to each item were “yes, sometimes, and no." Methods: Following a pilot of the tool with 24 psych-social club members, it was tested with 92 members from three psych-social clubs.   The instrument was administered by an experienced mental health worker after an introductory 3-5 day period of interacting with them to reduce any fear/discomfort related to the researcher’s presence.  Mental illness diagnosis was self-reported. Results: The sample consisted of 53.3% males with an age range of 23 to 80 and a mean age of 45.5.  The B&ST-MPC scores ranged from 20 to 72 (mean = 61.7); satisfaction scores ranged from 2 to 10 (mean = 8.4).  Coefficient alpha for the B&ST-MPC scale was .92.   B&ST-MPC scores and satisfaction were significantly correlated (r. = .243, p. = .032).  An unweighted least squares factor analysis with a Varimax rotation yielded three factors:  1) comfortable productive social interaction, 2) belonging/building self-esteem, and 3) learning to stay well.  Factors 1 and 2 were significantly correlated with satisfaction (r= .331, p = .012 and r = .279, p = .036, respectively).  Factor 3 was correlated with satisfaction in the expected direction but the relationship was not statistically significant. Implications:  The findings suggest high levels of satisfaction with psych-social club benefits; this seems to be primarily related to perceived relationships/interactions within one’s environment and a sense of belonging.  Further testing of the tools in different settings and with larger, more diverse populations is recommended. With this knowledge, providers can build best practice models that support maintenance of seriously mentally ill persons in the community.
Keywords:
Psych-social club
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4988
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleDEVELOPMENT OF A TOOL TO MEASURE MEMBER SATISFACTION WITH A PSYCH-SOCIAL CLUBen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211718-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This poster focuses on the development of the Benefits & Satisfaction Tool for Members of a Psych-social Club (B&ST-MPC).  The specific aims of the tool are three-fold: 1) exploration of what brought members to the club, 2) determination of ways the program benefits its members and 3) determination of what other services can be provided by the club. This poster addresses the second aim. Background. The mental health service (MHS) continuum is dependent on regional centres and community services. One such service model is the psych-social club which potentially reduces the utilization of costly in-patient services. However, validation by persons with serious mental illness regarding the benefits of and satisfaction with attending a club is needed.  Qualitative analysis of data from an earlier mixed methods study with psych-social club members supported the discovery of six healthy benefits.  These were crafted into 18 items measuring perceived benefits of attending a psych-social club; possible responses to each item were “yes, sometimes, and no." Methods: Following a pilot of the tool with 24 psych-social club members, it was tested with 92 members from three psych-social clubs.   The instrument was administered by an experienced mental health worker after an introductory 3-5 day period of interacting with them to reduce any fear/discomfort related to the researcher’s presence.  Mental illness diagnosis was self-reported. Results: The sample consisted of 53.3% males with an age range of 23 to 80 and a mean age of 45.5.  The B&ST-MPC scores ranged from 20 to 72 (mean = 61.7); satisfaction scores ranged from 2 to 10 (mean = 8.4).  Coefficient alpha for the B&ST-MPC scale was .92.   B&ST-MPC scores and satisfaction were significantly correlated (r. = .243, p. = .032).  An unweighted least squares factor analysis with a Varimax rotation yielded three factors:  1) comfortable productive social interaction, 2) belonging/building self-esteem, and 3) learning to stay well.  Factors 1 and 2 were significantly correlated with satisfaction (r= .331, p = .012 and r = .279, p = .036, respectively).  Factor 3 was correlated with satisfaction in the expected direction but the relationship was not statistically significant. Implications:  The findings suggest high levels of satisfaction with psych-social club benefits; this seems to be primarily related to perceived relationships/interactions within one’s environment and a sense of belonging.  Further testing of the tools in different settings and with larger, more diverse populations is recommended. With this knowledge, providers can build best practice models that support maintenance of seriously mentally ill persons in the community.en_GB
dc.subjectPsych-social cluben_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:10:15Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:10:15Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:10:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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