SOCIAL SUPPORT, MATERNAL HEALTH LITERACY AND HEALTH CARE OUTCOMES IN LATINO CHILDREN

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211720
Type:
Research Study
Title:
SOCIAL SUPPORT, MATERNAL HEALTH LITERACY AND HEALTH CARE OUTCOMES IN LATINO CHILDREN
Abstract:
Purposes/Aims: The purpose of this study is to examine the role that social support plays in mitigating the influence of low maternal health literacy on health outcomes among low-income, Latino children. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Substantial evidence indicates that low health literacy (HL) is associated with poor health outcomes, including inappropriate and inefficient use of health services in adult populations.  Several recent studies also link low parental HL to suboptimal pediatric health outcomes.  Importantly however, other evidence indicates no relationship between caregiver HL and child health outcomes suggesting that our understanding of the impact of parental HL on child health is incomplete.  One possible explanation for these equivocal findings may result from the social support offered to parents of young children from grandparents, siblings, babysitters, and teachers.  Adequate HL in one or more of these individuals may be “protective” and mitigate negative outcomes associated with low parental HL.  The impact of low parental or caregiver HL on pediatric health may be best evaluated when social support and other resources are considered.  Social support, such as a familial role model, may be especially important for low-income mothers with low HL. Social networks may improve their ability to acquire and understand medical information and navigate the health care system. Thus, social support may mediate or moderate the effects of low maternal HL and may account for some of the conflicting data in the pediatric HL studies. Methods: Low-income English- and Spanish-speaking Latina mothers / female primary caregivers of children aged three months to four years, who had utilized health care services within the prior six months, were recruited from WIC sites in Southern California to participate in this cross-sectional, correlational study (n= 126). Demographic data included maternal/caregiver education level, acculturation status and preferred language, child health insurance status, and whether the child received care from a regular place and regular provider. Maternal HL was measured using the Newest Vital Sign and the Single Item Literacy Screener.  Presence of social support was measured using the Family Support Scale. Perception of pediatric ambulatory care received was evaluated using the Promoting Health Development Survey. Results: Data analysis will include descriptive and correlation statistics to describe demographic characteristics associated with level of maternal HL.  Associations between maternal HL, maternal education level, maternal level of acculturation, primary maternal language used, child insurance status and access to regular source of care and presence of social support will be analyzed.  Moreover, the relationship between maternal HL, social support and specific outcomes of pediatric ambulatory care will be examined.  Specifically, data will be examined using Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient, one-way independent Analysis of Variance, and multiple regression. Implications: Limited maternal HL may substantially disrupt access to pediatric health care, impede informed maternal decision-making and exacerbate pediatric health disparities.  The findings from this study will assist health care providers in understanding the role that social support plays in mitigating negative impacts of low maternal HL.  Moreover, these results may stimulate further investigation into methods of maximizing social support for this population.
Keywords:
Health outcomes; Latino children; low income
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4997
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleSOCIAL SUPPORT, MATERNAL HEALTH LITERACY AND HEALTH CARE OUTCOMES IN LATINO CHILDRENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211720-
dc.description.abstractPurposes/Aims: The purpose of this study is to examine the role that social support plays in mitigating the influence of low maternal health literacy on health outcomes among low-income, Latino children. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Substantial evidence indicates that low health literacy (HL) is associated with poor health outcomes, including inappropriate and inefficient use of health services in adult populations.  Several recent studies also link low parental HL to suboptimal pediatric health outcomes.  Importantly however, other evidence indicates no relationship between caregiver HL and child health outcomes suggesting that our understanding of the impact of parental HL on child health is incomplete.  One possible explanation for these equivocal findings may result from the social support offered to parents of young children from grandparents, siblings, babysitters, and teachers.  Adequate HL in one or more of these individuals may be “protective” and mitigate negative outcomes associated with low parental HL.  The impact of low parental or caregiver HL on pediatric health may be best evaluated when social support and other resources are considered.  Social support, such as a familial role model, may be especially important for low-income mothers with low HL. Social networks may improve their ability to acquire and understand medical information and navigate the health care system. Thus, social support may mediate or moderate the effects of low maternal HL and may account for some of the conflicting data in the pediatric HL studies. Methods: Low-income English- and Spanish-speaking Latina mothers / female primary caregivers of children aged three months to four years, who had utilized health care services within the prior six months, were recruited from WIC sites in Southern California to participate in this cross-sectional, correlational study (n= 126). Demographic data included maternal/caregiver education level, acculturation status and preferred language, child health insurance status, and whether the child received care from a regular place and regular provider. Maternal HL was measured using the Newest Vital Sign and the Single Item Literacy Screener.  Presence of social support was measured using the Family Support Scale. Perception of pediatric ambulatory care received was evaluated using the Promoting Health Development Survey. Results: Data analysis will include descriptive and correlation statistics to describe demographic characteristics associated with level of maternal HL.  Associations between maternal HL, maternal education level, maternal level of acculturation, primary maternal language used, child insurance status and access to regular source of care and presence of social support will be analyzed.  Moreover, the relationship between maternal HL, social support and specific outcomes of pediatric ambulatory care will be examined.  Specifically, data will be examined using Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient, one-way independent Analysis of Variance, and multiple regression. Implications: Limited maternal HL may substantially disrupt access to pediatric health care, impede informed maternal decision-making and exacerbate pediatric health disparities.  The findings from this study will assist health care providers in understanding the role that social support plays in mitigating negative impacts of low maternal HL.  Moreover, these results may stimulate further investigation into methods of maximizing social support for this population.en_GB
dc.subjectHealth outcomesen_GB
dc.subjectLatino childrenen_GB
dc.subjectlow incomeen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:10:22Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:10:22Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:10:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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