SHARING STORIES: EMBODIED MEANINGS OF EARLY CHILDBEARING AMONG AMERICAN INDIAN WOMEN

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211721
Type:
Research Study
Title:
SHARING STORIES: EMBODIED MEANINGS OF EARLY CHILDBEARING AMONG AMERICAN INDIAN WOMEN
Abstract:
Purpose:  The purpose of this presentation is to describe the findings from a qualitative interpretive phenomenological study that aimed to understand the lived experience of early childbearing, or teen pregnancy, among adult American Indian women, with a particular focus on the meaning of early childbearing. Background: Early childbearing among American Indian women is common and despite a decrease in teen pregnancy for the general population since 1991, early childbearing continues to rise among Native women. In addition to higher substance rate use, these women are at greater risk for poor perinatal outcomes such as gestational diabetes, gestational hypertension and preterm deliveries than the general population. Little is known about the early childbearing experiences among American Indian women and how their lives are affected. Method: A convenience sample, comprised of 30 self-identified American Indian adult women aged 18 and older, was recruited from a Northwestern tribe and interviewed according to a semi-structured interview guide. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Interpretive phenomenology, as presented by Benner, with the use of thematic analysis, exemplars and paradigm cases was used to identify themes. All interviews, field notes and interpretive memos were transcribed and imported into Atlas.ti, a qualitative software program that aids in coding, organization, interpretation and thematic analysis. Each interview was repeatedly read for a global understanding and a summary was written to create a paradigm case. Similarities and comparisons were made across paradigm cases by means of thematic analysis, a tool to help identify meaningful patterns and concerns. Finally, exemplars were selected to demonstrate a particular salient situation or meaning. Results: The findings are contextualized within each woman’s life world, or lebenseweldt, which includes the shared experience of growing up as a woman on a reservation. Three overarching themes were identified from women’s stories: mourning a lost childhood, seeking fulfillment, and embodying responsibility. Women indicated that despite their tumultuous childhoods, early childbearing presented an opportunity to carve out new roles and embrace distinctive positive actions.  Many women expressed that for without becoming pregnant early, their lives would have been set upon destructive paths. Nursing Implications: Understanding begins with listening, and listening to one’s story can yield much information to help nurses and clinicians effect change. Nurses and clinicians are uniquely positioned to support positive changes and healthy behaviors by helping these women identify and end their risky behaviors which may help improve parenting practices, in addition to preventing and delaying early childbearing.
Keywords:
American Indian women; Early childbearing experience
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5005
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleSHARING STORIES: EMBODIED MEANINGS OF EARLY CHILDBEARING AMONG AMERICAN INDIAN WOMENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211721-
dc.description.abstractPurpose:  The purpose of this presentation is to describe the findings from a qualitative interpretive phenomenological study that aimed to understand the lived experience of early childbearing, or teen pregnancy, among adult American Indian women, with a particular focus on the meaning of early childbearing. Background: Early childbearing among American Indian women is common and despite a decrease in teen pregnancy for the general population since 1991, early childbearing continues to rise among Native women. In addition to higher substance rate use, these women are at greater risk for poor perinatal outcomes such as gestational diabetes, gestational hypertension and preterm deliveries than the general population. Little is known about the early childbearing experiences among American Indian women and how their lives are affected. Method: A convenience sample, comprised of 30 self-identified American Indian adult women aged 18 and older, was recruited from a Northwestern tribe and interviewed according to a semi-structured interview guide. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Interpretive phenomenology, as presented by Benner, with the use of thematic analysis, exemplars and paradigm cases was used to identify themes. All interviews, field notes and interpretive memos were transcribed and imported into Atlas.ti, a qualitative software program that aids in coding, organization, interpretation and thematic analysis. Each interview was repeatedly read for a global understanding and a summary was written to create a paradigm case. Similarities and comparisons were made across paradigm cases by means of thematic analysis, a tool to help identify meaningful patterns and concerns. Finally, exemplars were selected to demonstrate a particular salient situation or meaning. Results: The findings are contextualized within each woman’s life world, or lebenseweldt, which includes the shared experience of growing up as a woman on a reservation. Three overarching themes were identified from women’s stories: mourning a lost childhood, seeking fulfillment, and embodying responsibility. Women indicated that despite their tumultuous childhoods, early childbearing presented an opportunity to carve out new roles and embrace distinctive positive actions.  Many women expressed that for without becoming pregnant early, their lives would have been set upon destructive paths. Nursing Implications: Understanding begins with listening, and listening to one’s story can yield much information to help nurses and clinicians effect change. Nurses and clinicians are uniquely positioned to support positive changes and healthy behaviors by helping these women identify and end their risky behaviors which may help improve parenting practices, in addition to preventing and delaying early childbearing.en_GB
dc.subjectAmerican Indian womenen_GB
dc.subjectEarly childbearing experienceen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:10:26Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:10:26Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:10:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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