2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211723
Type:
Research Study
Title:
AMERICAN INDIAN CANCER SURVIVORS AND STORYTELLING
Abstract:
Purpose: This paper explores the use of storytelling as a data collection method among American Indian cancer survivors enrolled in a study of the management of cancer-related symptoms.. How taboos topics are handled by researchers may have significant consequences for the on-going sharing of information by American Indian research participants. Background: Cancer is rapidly becoming diagnosed in American Indian communities. To better understand the cancer phenomena, storytelling was used as a method to gather information on the cultural constructs of cancer and cancer-related symptom management in pain, depression, fatigue and loss of function. We explore taboo topics, learn how to respond to them, and explore approaches, successes and lessons learned. Method: One-hundred and twenty six (126) American Indian adult cancer survivors participated in focus groups and 20 were interviewed separately when they arrived at a Arizona hospital for treatment or for provider appointment in 2009-10. Focus groups and interviews (as storytelling) were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. Transcriptions were analyzed independently by three project researchers. Identified common themes were coded and formed into categories following Grounded Theory analytical procedures. Relationships between categories were analyzed. Results: American Indian cancer survivors recounted their experiences and difficulties in talking with healthcare providers during cancer treatment. In general, providers came across as: too direct, not compassionate, unlikely to provide more in depth information, did not listen to/or believe patient report of symptoms (i.e. pain). In addition, while taboos appear to impact elders the most, younger generations are also influenced by community traditions/beliefs. Four categories of information were identified explaining the value and the use of storytelling: oral tradition, pedagogical method, control, culturally sensitive imparting of information. Implications: Identifying and understanding the cultural constructs of cancer symptom management will aid nurses in providing cancer symptom management and support to American Indian cancer survivors. Storytelling gives the survivor a method for illustrating the cancer experience, describing pain and communicating healthcare needs. Storytelling also aids the nurse in describing the potential consequences of behaviors and invites the listener to reflect on personal behaviors. It grounds history, relationships, and situations and provides information that may not be obtainable in any other fashion.
Keywords:
American Indian cancer survivors; Symptom management; Storytelling
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5006
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleAMERICAN INDIAN CANCER SURVIVORS AND STORYTELLINGen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211723-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This paper explores the use of storytelling as a data collection method among American Indian cancer survivors enrolled in a study of the management of cancer-related symptoms.. How taboos topics are handled by researchers may have significant consequences for the on-going sharing of information by American Indian research participants. Background: Cancer is rapidly becoming diagnosed in American Indian communities. To better understand the cancer phenomena, storytelling was used as a method to gather information on the cultural constructs of cancer and cancer-related symptom management in pain, depression, fatigue and loss of function. We explore taboo topics, learn how to respond to them, and explore approaches, successes and lessons learned. Method: One-hundred and twenty six (126) American Indian adult cancer survivors participated in focus groups and 20 were interviewed separately when they arrived at a Arizona hospital for treatment or for provider appointment in 2009-10. Focus groups and interviews (as storytelling) were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. Transcriptions were analyzed independently by three project researchers. Identified common themes were coded and formed into categories following Grounded Theory analytical procedures. Relationships between categories were analyzed. Results: American Indian cancer survivors recounted their experiences and difficulties in talking with healthcare providers during cancer treatment. In general, providers came across as: too direct, not compassionate, unlikely to provide more in depth information, did not listen to/or believe patient report of symptoms (i.e. pain). In addition, while taboos appear to impact elders the most, younger generations are also influenced by community traditions/beliefs. Four categories of information were identified explaining the value and the use of storytelling: oral tradition, pedagogical method, control, culturally sensitive imparting of information. Implications: Identifying and understanding the cultural constructs of cancer symptom management will aid nurses in providing cancer symptom management and support to American Indian cancer survivors. Storytelling gives the survivor a method for illustrating the cancer experience, describing pain and communicating healthcare needs. Storytelling also aids the nurse in describing the potential consequences of behaviors and invites the listener to reflect on personal behaviors. It grounds history, relationships, and situations and provides information that may not be obtainable in any other fashion.en_GB
dc.subjectAmerican Indian cancer survivorsen_GB
dc.subjectSymptom managementen_GB
dc.subjectStorytellingen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:10:33Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:10:33Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:10:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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