HER-STORY: DEVELOPING AN HIV STORYTELLING INTERVENTION FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211724
Type:
Research Study
Title:
HER-STORY: DEVELOPING AN HIV STORYTELLING INTERVENTION FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims: Prior qualitative research assessing the factors that influenced African -American women’s sexual decision making patterns identified story telling as a tool for supporting HIV prevention knowledge and risk reduction strategies among African American women. In this presentation, we describe the process involved in formulating narratives to be used in a proposed HER-Story intervention. Background: The rate of HIV/AIDS diagnosis for African American women is now approximately 23 times the rate of their white female counterparts and is consistently rising among African American women between the ages of 18-39.  Intervention studies to date have primarily focused on exploring the causes of high risk sexual behaviors among African American women. However, understanding the factors that have contributed to African American woman’s risk for HIV acquisition is only a portion of the solution. Recent research findings have emphasized the importance of understanding the sexual decision-making patterns of heterosexual African American women. Storytelling may be key as women interviewed via qualitative methodology verbalized that stories and scenarios about HIV risk and safety shared by media programs, friends (peers) and via health educators provided positive sexual health information that increased their knowledge about HIV prevention and decreased episodes for engaging in risky sexual behaviors. The developed HER-Story intervention seeks to increase HIV knowledge and reduce HIV sexual risk behaviors through the use of storytelling. Methods: A qualitative study design using a grounded theory approach was used to explore themes and contexts related to sexual decision-making among 14 urban African American women ages 18-30 in Los Angeles County. The framework that guided this research was the Transcultural Nursing Theory. This theory provided a useful conceptual lens that allowed for the unique exploration of the stories of African American women and aided in an examination of how various cultural factors impact their sexual behaviors. Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection. A content analysis was additionally done to identify the most common themes from the data collected. Findings: Forty-eight narrative themes were identified from the 14 interviews. The most repeated themes were organized and ranked from most to least frequently occurring using a frequency matrix. The top 10-20 themes exclusively grouped examined the following factors: 1) condom use, 2) sex partner selection behaviors, and 3) sexual risk were included in the six stories developed for use in the HER-Story intervention. The six stories developed were finalized by an expert panel. Implications: Current efforts to curb HIV/AIDS for African American heterosexual women from urban communities have not been efficacious. The narratives developed for the HER-Story project can provide insights into how the cultural realities of African American women can be addressed and incorporated in HIV prevention programming. 
Keywords:
African-American women; Storytelling; HIV prevention
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5007
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleHER-STORY: DEVELOPING AN HIV STORYTELLING INTERVENTION FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211724-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims: Prior qualitative research assessing the factors that influenced African -American women’s sexual decision making patterns identified story telling as a tool for supporting HIV prevention knowledge and risk reduction strategies among African American women. In this presentation, we describe the process involved in formulating narratives to be used in a proposed HER-Story intervention. Background: The rate of HIV/AIDS diagnosis for African American women is now approximately 23 times the rate of their white female counterparts and is consistently rising among African American women between the ages of 18-39.  Intervention studies to date have primarily focused on exploring the causes of high risk sexual behaviors among African American women. However, understanding the factors that have contributed to African American woman’s risk for HIV acquisition is only a portion of the solution. Recent research findings have emphasized the importance of understanding the sexual decision-making patterns of heterosexual African American women. Storytelling may be key as women interviewed via qualitative methodology verbalized that stories and scenarios about HIV risk and safety shared by media programs, friends (peers) and via health educators provided positive sexual health information that increased their knowledge about HIV prevention and decreased episodes for engaging in risky sexual behaviors. The developed HER-Story intervention seeks to increase HIV knowledge and reduce HIV sexual risk behaviors through the use of storytelling. Methods: A qualitative study design using a grounded theory approach was used to explore themes and contexts related to sexual decision-making among 14 urban African American women ages 18-30 in Los Angeles County. The framework that guided this research was the Transcultural Nursing Theory. This theory provided a useful conceptual lens that allowed for the unique exploration of the stories of African American women and aided in an examination of how various cultural factors impact their sexual behaviors. Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection. A content analysis was additionally done to identify the most common themes from the data collected. Findings: Forty-eight narrative themes were identified from the 14 interviews. The most repeated themes were organized and ranked from most to least frequently occurring using a frequency matrix. The top 10-20 themes exclusively grouped examined the following factors: 1) condom use, 2) sex partner selection behaviors, and 3) sexual risk were included in the six stories developed for use in the HER-Story intervention. The six stories developed were finalized by an expert panel. Implications: Current efforts to curb HIV/AIDS for African American heterosexual women from urban communities have not been efficacious. The narratives developed for the HER-Story project can provide insights into how the cultural realities of African American women can be addressed and incorporated in HIV prevention programming. en_GB
dc.subjectAfrican-American womenen_GB
dc.subjectStorytellingen_GB
dc.subjectHIV preventionen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:10:37Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:10:37Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:10:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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