HEALTH LITERACY, SELF-EFFICACY, AND INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION IN LATINA MOTHERS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211725
Type:
Research Study
Title:
HEALTH LITERACY, SELF-EFFICACY, AND INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION IN LATINA MOTHERS
Abstract:
Purposes/Aims: This study examines the associations between maternal health literacy (HL), self-efficacy for communication, and maternal-provider interpersonal communication to better understand how low maternal HL influences parental management of child health or illness. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: During any health care encounter, patients are expected to provide information, respond to questions, and make inquiries associated with their health and illness related concerns.  Accordingly, effective interpersonal communication skills, including self-efficacy for communication, are essential for successful patient-provider interactions.  Research indicates that individuals with low health literacy (HL) experience challenges in communicating with providers and demonstrate poor comprehension of provider instructions, ask few questions within a clinical encounter and often report poor satisfaction with patient-provider communication.  Moreover, low-income populations, specifically at risk for low HL, report dissatisfaction with patient-provider communication. Limited research has considered self-efficacy and interpersonal communication skills within the context of HL.  Even fewer studies examine these constructs within the context of the pediatric setting.  Substantial research indicates that effective parent-provider communication is generally associated with parental satisfaction with child health care, adherence to treatment recommendations, the building of trust in the therapeutic relationship, and improved discussion of psychosocial concerns, an integral component of pediatric ambulatory health care. Poor communication, especially among low-income populations, or foreign-born or non-native English-speaking parents, contributes to poor child health outcomes and exacerbates pediatric health disparities. Methods: Low-income English- and Spanish-speaking Latina mothers / female primary caregivers of children aged three months to four years, who had utilized health care services within the prior six months, were recruited from WIC sites in Southern California to participate in this cross-sectional, correlational study (n= 126).  Demographic data included maternal/caregiver education level, acculturation status and preferred language, access to social support, child health insurance status, and whether the child received care from a regular place and regular provider. Maternal HL was measured using the Newest Vital Sign and the Single Item Literacy Screener. Self-efficacy in communication was assessed using the Perceived Efficacy in Patient-Physician Interactions while perception of interpersonal interactions was measured using the Interpersonal Processes of Care in Diverse Populations survey. Results: Data analysis will include descriptive and correlation statistics to describe demographic characteristics associated with level of maternal HL.  Associations between maternal HL, maternal education level, maternal level of acculturation, primary maternal language used, access to social support, child insurance status and access to regular source of care will be examined.  Moreover, the relationships between maternal HL, self-efficacy, and specific dimensions of maternal-provider interpersonal interactions will be examined.  Specifically, data will be examined using Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient, one-way independent analysis of variance, and multiple regression. Implications: Limited maternal HL may disrupt access to pediatric health care, impede informed maternal decision-making and exacerbate pediatric health disparities.  Identifying factors that influence effective interpersonal communication skills, including low HL and self-efficacy, can assist health care providers in supporting the efforts of low-income Latina mothers to communicate, obtain and understand information necessary for the promotion of health in young children in this vulnerable population.
Keywords:
Low maternal health literacy; Parental management; Child health; Child illness
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5008
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleHEALTH LITERACY, SELF-EFFICACY, AND INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION IN LATINA MOTHERSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211725-
dc.description.abstractPurposes/Aims: This study examines the associations between maternal health literacy (HL), self-efficacy for communication, and maternal-provider interpersonal communication to better understand how low maternal HL influences parental management of child health or illness. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: During any health care encounter, patients are expected to provide information, respond to questions, and make inquiries associated with their health and illness related concerns.  Accordingly, effective interpersonal communication skills, including self-efficacy for communication, are essential for successful patient-provider interactions.  Research indicates that individuals with low health literacy (HL) experience challenges in communicating with providers and demonstrate poor comprehension of provider instructions, ask few questions within a clinical encounter and often report poor satisfaction with patient-provider communication.  Moreover, low-income populations, specifically at risk for low HL, report dissatisfaction with patient-provider communication. Limited research has considered self-efficacy and interpersonal communication skills within the context of HL.  Even fewer studies examine these constructs within the context of the pediatric setting.  Substantial research indicates that effective parent-provider communication is generally associated with parental satisfaction with child health care, adherence to treatment recommendations, the building of trust in the therapeutic relationship, and improved discussion of psychosocial concerns, an integral component of pediatric ambulatory health care. Poor communication, especially among low-income populations, or foreign-born or non-native English-speaking parents, contributes to poor child health outcomes and exacerbates pediatric health disparities. Methods: Low-income English- and Spanish-speaking Latina mothers / female primary caregivers of children aged three months to four years, who had utilized health care services within the prior six months, were recruited from WIC sites in Southern California to participate in this cross-sectional, correlational study (n= 126).  Demographic data included maternal/caregiver education level, acculturation status and preferred language, access to social support, child health insurance status, and whether the child received care from a regular place and regular provider. Maternal HL was measured using the Newest Vital Sign and the Single Item Literacy Screener. Self-efficacy in communication was assessed using the Perceived Efficacy in Patient-Physician Interactions while perception of interpersonal interactions was measured using the Interpersonal Processes of Care in Diverse Populations survey. Results: Data analysis will include descriptive and correlation statistics to describe demographic characteristics associated with level of maternal HL.  Associations between maternal HL, maternal education level, maternal level of acculturation, primary maternal language used, access to social support, child insurance status and access to regular source of care will be examined.  Moreover, the relationships between maternal HL, self-efficacy, and specific dimensions of maternal-provider interpersonal interactions will be examined.  Specifically, data will be examined using Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient, one-way independent analysis of variance, and multiple regression. Implications: Limited maternal HL may disrupt access to pediatric health care, impede informed maternal decision-making and exacerbate pediatric health disparities.  Identifying factors that influence effective interpersonal communication skills, including low HL and self-efficacy, can assist health care providers in supporting the efforts of low-income Latina mothers to communicate, obtain and understand information necessary for the promotion of health in young children in this vulnerable population.en_GB
dc.subjectLow maternal health literacyen_GB
dc.subjectParental managementen_GB
dc.subjectChild healthen_GB
dc.subjectChild illnessen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:10:40Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:10:40Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:10:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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