2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211726
Type:
Research Study
Title:
ADVANCING INNOVATION AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT TO PREVENT AND ADDRESS IPV
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims: The aim of this Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) inquiry was to motivate system engagement and strengthen responsive support for Native Hawaiian and Filipina women and girls to prevent and address abuse in their intimate relationships.  A Consortium for Health Safety and Support (CHSS) was formed to serve an identified geographic area on Oahu, Hawaii. Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a complex health and social issue affecting women around the world, yet intervention strategies are based on Western notions of family life. Services do not take into account the unique perspectives of different cultures which may lead to barriers that prevent women from receiving effective care. Annually in the US, IPV is responsible for 40 – 50% of murders of women. An estimated $5.6 billion is spent on health care for more than 2.5 million injuries. The long-term purpose of the CBPR course of research is development of a culturally appropriate, community participatory, and gender focused prevention intervention for IPV. Rationale/ Conceptual Basis/ Background: Critical social theory (CST) is the theoretical framework for this course of research. The intent of CST is to “challenge conventional assumptions and social arrangements.” CBPR is consistent with the perspective of CST. An expected outcome of CBPR is the attainment of new knowledge that guides actions, increases the relevancy of studies, leading to a deeper understanding. Methods: A prior cross sectional, descriptive study collected both qualitative and quantitative data from peoples representing the following cultural groups: Native Hawaiians, Filipinos, Chuukese, and Samoan. Five common themes identified across the four cultural groups included: Living within a Collective; Cultural Protective Factors; Cultural Barriers to Helpseeking; Gender Specific Roles; and Belonging to a Place.  The common themes served as the framework for CHSS activities, including the development of a current intervention and a community based strategic action plan. Results:  Focus areas from a community health needs assessment completed through the CHSS identified the following strategic action plan to address IPV:  a) Community ownership of “talk story” discussion groups to learn about IPV and support or provide places of safety that are gender based and culturally specific to support women and girls; b) Strengthen linkages to build capacity with other coalitions or organizations within the targeted community to further identify natural helpers; c) Identify the need for specialized services; and d) Identify strategic best practices for service providers regarding IPV. Implications: The focus of this presentation is the current intervention to engage community members and community based organizations in creating and owning a system of support for women and girls within the community to prevent and address interpersonal violence. This complex issue which is mediated within families and communities is best addressed with their full participation.
Keywords:
Hawaiian women; Filipina women; Abuse
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5012
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleADVANCING INNOVATION AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT TO PREVENT AND ADDRESS IPVen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211726-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims: The aim of this Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) inquiry was to motivate system engagement and strengthen responsive support for Native Hawaiian and Filipina women and girls to prevent and address abuse in their intimate relationships.  A Consortium for Health Safety and Support (CHSS) was formed to serve an identified geographic area on Oahu, Hawaii. Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a complex health and social issue affecting women around the world, yet intervention strategies are based on Western notions of family life. Services do not take into account the unique perspectives of different cultures which may lead to barriers that prevent women from receiving effective care. Annually in the US, IPV is responsible for 40 – 50% of murders of women. An estimated $5.6 billion is spent on health care for more than 2.5 million injuries. The long-term purpose of the CBPR course of research is development of a culturally appropriate, community participatory, and gender focused prevention intervention for IPV. Rationale/ Conceptual Basis/ Background: Critical social theory (CST) is the theoretical framework for this course of research. The intent of CST is to “challenge conventional assumptions and social arrangements.” CBPR is consistent with the perspective of CST. An expected outcome of CBPR is the attainment of new knowledge that guides actions, increases the relevancy of studies, leading to a deeper understanding. Methods: A prior cross sectional, descriptive study collected both qualitative and quantitative data from peoples representing the following cultural groups: Native Hawaiians, Filipinos, Chuukese, and Samoan. Five common themes identified across the four cultural groups included: Living within a Collective; Cultural Protective Factors; Cultural Barriers to Helpseeking; Gender Specific Roles; and Belonging to a Place.  The common themes served as the framework for CHSS activities, including the development of a current intervention and a community based strategic action plan. Results:  Focus areas from a community health needs assessment completed through the CHSS identified the following strategic action plan to address IPV:  a) Community ownership of “talk story” discussion groups to learn about IPV and support or provide places of safety that are gender based and culturally specific to support women and girls; b) Strengthen linkages to build capacity with other coalitions or organizations within the targeted community to further identify natural helpers; c) Identify the need for specialized services; and d) Identify strategic best practices for service providers regarding IPV. Implications: The focus of this presentation is the current intervention to engage community members and community based organizations in creating and owning a system of support for women and girls within the community to prevent and address interpersonal violence. This complex issue which is mediated within families and communities is best addressed with their full participation.en_GB
dc.subjectHawaiian womenen_GB
dc.subjectFilipina womenen_GB
dc.subjectAbuseen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:10:44Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:10:44Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:10:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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