2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211727
Type:
Research Study
Title:
CORTISOL DURING SLEEP IN RESPONSE TO IMPENDING PUBLIC SPEECH IN WOMEN WITH IBS
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this analysis was to compare cortisol levels over the night before a public speaking task in women with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) compared to a healthy comparison (HC) group, and to evaluate the association between cortisol and sleep quality. Methods: Forty women with IBS and 24 HC women gave written consent and completed questionnaires (Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index [PSQI]) at the initial visit. Women slept for three nights in a sleep laboratory. On the third night serial blood samples for cortisol were collected every 20 minutes (8 PM – 7 AM). Immediately prior to bedtime, women were reminded that the next morning they would give a brief talk on their experiences to an audience. Plasma cortisol levels were assayed with a Immulite kit for serum cortisol (Siemens, Deerfield, IL). The next morning, they self-reported the quality of sleep relative to their typical sleep at home. For the analysis, cortisol levels were collapsed into one hour blocks. Results: High cortisol in the 2 hours prior to and the first 2 hours after the onset of sleep is associated with worse sleep efficiency (p-values .010 to .052) and weakly associated with poor sleep quality by PSQI over the prior month (p-values .099 to .244). Paradoxically, we found that higher cortisol was associated with better sleep as self-reported on the morning after the third sleep lab night (p-values .001 to .016). Conclusion: Women with IBS had higher cortisol levels compared to HC. The association between cortisol and sleep quality is complicated, and depends on how sleep quality is measured. These results may be due to differences in reactivity to stressors, an IV line and public speaking.
Keywords:
Irritable bowel syndrome; women
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5014
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleCORTISOL DURING SLEEP IN RESPONSE TO IMPENDING PUBLIC SPEECH IN WOMEN WITH IBSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211727-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this analysis was to compare cortisol levels over the night before a public speaking task in women with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) compared to a healthy comparison (HC) group, and to evaluate the association between cortisol and sleep quality. Methods: Forty women with IBS and 24 HC women gave written consent and completed questionnaires (Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index [PSQI]) at the initial visit. Women slept for three nights in a sleep laboratory. On the third night serial blood samples for cortisol were collected every 20 minutes (8 PM – 7 AM). Immediately prior to bedtime, women were reminded that the next morning they would give a brief talk on their experiences to an audience. Plasma cortisol levels were assayed with a Immulite kit for serum cortisol (Siemens, Deerfield, IL). The next morning, they self-reported the quality of sleep relative to their typical sleep at home. For the analysis, cortisol levels were collapsed into one hour blocks. Results: High cortisol in the 2 hours prior to and the first 2 hours after the onset of sleep is associated with worse sleep efficiency (p-values .010 to .052) and weakly associated with poor sleep quality by PSQI over the prior month (p-values .099 to .244). Paradoxically, we found that higher cortisol was associated with better sleep as self-reported on the morning after the third sleep lab night (p-values .001 to .016). Conclusion: Women with IBS had higher cortisol levels compared to HC. The association between cortisol and sleep quality is complicated, and depends on how sleep quality is measured. These results may be due to differences in reactivity to stressors, an IV line and public speaking.en_GB
dc.subjectIrritable bowel syndromeen_GB
dc.subjectwomenen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:10:47Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:10:47Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:10:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.