2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211728
Type:
Research Study
Title:
CRITICAL ETHNOGRAPHY OF MEXICAN PRIMIPARAS REGARDING EXCLUSIVE BREASTFEEDING
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study is to critically examine the cultural values, beliefs, and practices regarding infant feeding with a focus on exclusive breastfeeding in Mexican primiparas who have immigrated to Colorado within the last 5 years. Aims: 1) To describe the culture care values, beliefs, and practices of recently immigrated Mexican women surrounding infant feeding and breastfeeding during the first three months. 2) To explore if (and how) culture, gender, and issues of power/marginalization affect recently immigrated Mexican primiparas’ attitudes, beliefs, and practice regarding infant feeding and exclusive breastfeeding. 3) To gain an understanding of how recently immigrated Mexican primiparas respond to nurses’ and healthcare providers’ “authoritative” knowledge regarding exclusive breastfeeding, to determine how the women “sort through” this information to create new unique understandings/approaches to exclusive breastfeeding. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Worldwide it is acknowledged that breastfeeding is the preferred method for feeding newborns, with significant health benefits for the mother and newborn. Recent breastfeeding duration statistics for Mexican women in the United States and Colorado are below the goals of Health People 2020. Mexican women in Colorado represent an underserved and marginalized group as evidenced by their culture’s history in Colorado, gender status within their culture, their immigration status, inability to speak English, and socioeconomic status. All of these factors may affect duration of exclusive breastfeeding duration. In order for nursing to support breastfeeding in this population, it is important that we understand factors that may impact the sustainability of exclusive breastfeeding. Method: This study used Carspecken’s method of Critical Ethnography which aims to link social phenomena to sociocultural historical events “exposing prevailing systems of domination, hidden assumptions, ideologies, and discourses” (Hardcastle, Usher, & Holmes, 2006, p. 151).  CQR evaluates language and communicative processes. Results: Findings revealed that WIC embraces a culture of exclusive breastfeeding and that WIC is a major source of information for women. Exclusive breastfeeding is a natural choice for women and is considered “women’s work.” Women’s support systems were altered and they often experienced isolation during the transition to motherhood and the role of providing for their baby by exclusively breastfeeding. They experienced additional challenges exclusively breastfeeding as they negotiated issues of modesty as well as returning to work. Women asserted agency  based on the values of providing the best for baby and the maternal-infant bond. Women valued biomedical information. Messaging of information and evaluation of “best for baby” slogan is advised. Implications: This study provided new knowledge through a critical lens regarding exclusive breastfeeding in recently immigrated Mexican women. With this understanding nurses can provide care and institute system changes to increase exclusive breastfeeding and improve the health of infants in this population. Implications for further research were identified which include research with other vulnerable populations. Future research testing interventions are suggested based on findings that women desired more continuity and community in breastfeeding education. References: Hardcastle, M. Usher, K., Holmes, C. (2006). Carspecken’s five-stage critical qualitative research method: An application to nursing research. Qualitative Health Research, 16(1), 151-161.
Keywords:
Mexican American; breastfeeding
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5024
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleCRITICAL ETHNOGRAPHY OF MEXICAN PRIMIPARAS REGARDING EXCLUSIVE BREASTFEEDINGen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211728-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study is to critically examine the cultural values, beliefs, and practices regarding infant feeding with a focus on exclusive breastfeeding in Mexican primiparas who have immigrated to Colorado within the last 5 years. Aims: 1) To describe the culture care values, beliefs, and practices of recently immigrated Mexican women surrounding infant feeding and breastfeeding during the first three months. 2) To explore if (and how) culture, gender, and issues of power/marginalization affect recently immigrated Mexican primiparas’ attitudes, beliefs, and practice regarding infant feeding and exclusive breastfeeding. 3) To gain an understanding of how recently immigrated Mexican primiparas respond to nurses’ and healthcare providers’ “authoritative” knowledge regarding exclusive breastfeeding, to determine how the women “sort through” this information to create new unique understandings/approaches to exclusive breastfeeding. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Worldwide it is acknowledged that breastfeeding is the preferred method for feeding newborns, with significant health benefits for the mother and newborn. Recent breastfeeding duration statistics for Mexican women in the United States and Colorado are below the goals of Health People 2020. Mexican women in Colorado represent an underserved and marginalized group as evidenced by their culture’s history in Colorado, gender status within their culture, their immigration status, inability to speak English, and socioeconomic status. All of these factors may affect duration of exclusive breastfeeding duration. In order for nursing to support breastfeeding in this population, it is important that we understand factors that may impact the sustainability of exclusive breastfeeding. Method: This study used Carspecken’s method of Critical Ethnography which aims to link social phenomena to sociocultural historical events “exposing prevailing systems of domination, hidden assumptions, ideologies, and discourses” (Hardcastle, Usher, & Holmes, 2006, p. 151).  CQR evaluates language and communicative processes. Results: Findings revealed that WIC embraces a culture of exclusive breastfeeding and that WIC is a major source of information for women. Exclusive breastfeeding is a natural choice for women and is considered “women’s work.” Women’s support systems were altered and they often experienced isolation during the transition to motherhood and the role of providing for their baby by exclusively breastfeeding. They experienced additional challenges exclusively breastfeeding as they negotiated issues of modesty as well as returning to work. Women asserted agency  based on the values of providing the best for baby and the maternal-infant bond. Women valued biomedical information. Messaging of information and evaluation of “best for baby” slogan is advised. Implications: This study provided new knowledge through a critical lens regarding exclusive breastfeeding in recently immigrated Mexican women. With this understanding nurses can provide care and institute system changes to increase exclusive breastfeeding and improve the health of infants in this population. Implications for further research were identified which include research with other vulnerable populations. Future research testing interventions are suggested based on findings that women desired more continuity and community in breastfeeding education. References: Hardcastle, M. Usher, K., Holmes, C. (2006). Carspecken’s five-stage critical qualitative research method: An application to nursing research. Qualitative Health Research, 16(1), 151-161.en_GB
dc.subjectMexican Americanen_GB
dc.subjectbreastfeedingen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:10:50Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:10:50Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:10:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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