2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211729
Type:
Research Study
Title:
RECRUITING AFRICAN AMERICAN CAREGIVERS OF OLDER ADULTS FOR RESEARCH STUDIES
Abstract:
Purposes: The purpose of this presentation is to explore the challenges and effective strategies for recruitment of African American (AA) post-caregivers to participate in research studies. Background: There are over 40 million older adults (65 years and older) in the US.  Most of them rely on their family caregivers for 80% of their care, yet we know little about the post-caregiving transition in either Anglos or African American (AA) families. Using Meleis’ Transitions Theory as a conceptual framework, we explored the post-caregiving transition in AAs. During this exploration, we confronted recruitment challenges as we worked to gain access and establish trust with willing, qualified AA participants. Recruitment of such minorities to research studies is often an arduous task because they often distrust researchers due to historical and ethical research concerns, e.g., the Tuskegee Syphilis Study. Methods: We designed two mixed methods studies with African American (AA) post-caregivers whose elderly loved ones died within the last 10 years. The preliminary study used a focus group for data collection and the second study utilized individual semi-structured interviews of post-caregivers, along with Social Support, Brief Cope, and CES-D. Effective recruitment strategies identified during the course of these studies included: Providing an AA researcher/cultural broker as the main contact for recruitment and data collection purposes; creating close positive working relationships with church leaders at local AA churches; cultivating personal or word-of-mouth contacts; and establishing positive relationships with various local businesses (such as hair dressers) and community organizations. Outcomes: We have been successful in two on-going research studies in meeting and sometimes surpassing our recruitment goals with AA population. For the focus group, we expected 4-6 participants and recruited 12 in one night.  For the individual interviews, we were able to recruit 31 of our needed 40 participants within a 2-week period. Conclusions: Research studies with ethnic minorities must respect the cultural disposition of the group and include culturally and linguistically congruent investigators, who are either active in the community itself or closely allied with community leaders.
Keywords:
African Americans; family caregivers; post-caregiving
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5027
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleRECRUITING AFRICAN AMERICAN CAREGIVERS OF OLDER ADULTS FOR RESEARCH STUDIESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211729-
dc.description.abstractPurposes: The purpose of this presentation is to explore the challenges and effective strategies for recruitment of African American (AA) post-caregivers to participate in research studies. Background: There are over 40 million older adults (65 years and older) in the US.  Most of them rely on their family caregivers for 80% of their care, yet we know little about the post-caregiving transition in either Anglos or African American (AA) families. Using Meleis’ Transitions Theory as a conceptual framework, we explored the post-caregiving transition in AAs. During this exploration, we confronted recruitment challenges as we worked to gain access and establish trust with willing, qualified AA participants. Recruitment of such minorities to research studies is often an arduous task because they often distrust researchers due to historical and ethical research concerns, e.g., the Tuskegee Syphilis Study. Methods: We designed two mixed methods studies with African American (AA) post-caregivers whose elderly loved ones died within the last 10 years. The preliminary study used a focus group for data collection and the second study utilized individual semi-structured interviews of post-caregivers, along with Social Support, Brief Cope, and CES-D. Effective recruitment strategies identified during the course of these studies included: Providing an AA researcher/cultural broker as the main contact for recruitment and data collection purposes; creating close positive working relationships with church leaders at local AA churches; cultivating personal or word-of-mouth contacts; and establishing positive relationships with various local businesses (such as hair dressers) and community organizations. Outcomes: We have been successful in two on-going research studies in meeting and sometimes surpassing our recruitment goals with AA population. For the focus group, we expected 4-6 participants and recruited 12 in one night.  For the individual interviews, we were able to recruit 31 of our needed 40 participants within a 2-week period. Conclusions: Research studies with ethnic minorities must respect the cultural disposition of the group and include culturally and linguistically congruent investigators, who are either active in the community itself or closely allied with community leaders.en_GB
dc.subjectAfrican Americansen_GB
dc.subjectfamily caregiversen_GB
dc.subjectpost-caregivingen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:10:54Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:10:54Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:10:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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