COMPARISON OF EXPERT AND NOVICE RURAL NURSE JOB SATISFACTION AND CONTROL OVER PRACTICE

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211732
Type:
Research Study
Title:
COMPARISON OF EXPERT AND NOVICE RURAL NURSE JOB SATISFACTION AND CONTROL OVER PRACTICE
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims: The purpose was to compare rural novice and expert perceptions of the workplace, organizational culture, job satisfaction, and control over practice. Rationale: Understanding rural nurse organizational culture and control over practice elements are foundational to program development for increased nurse retention. The literature states turnover during the first year ranges up to 65%. Some states are unable to hire new graduates due to the prevalence of rural facilities; for instance, Montana loses 60% of new graduates to other states. Understanding rural nurse perceptions of work is needed to support practice and recruitment. Methods: Participants in a national residency program completed the McCloskey and Mueller and Gerber Control over Practice surveys online. A total of 118 novice and 60 expert rural nurses from 23 states completed all elements of the surveys. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney tests compared novice and expert answers. Results: There were significant differences in novice and expert job satisfaction from the McCloskey and Mueller Survey.  Salary, vacation, hours worked, flexibility scheduling days, opportunity to work only days, the physicians worked with, opportunities for career advancement, the amount of responsibility received, opportunity to work part time, flexibility in scheduling  weekends, and maternity leave differences were identified. Experts reported higher perceptions of control over practice than novices did in the following areas: The ability to implement nursing care in an efficient manner, provide holistic patient-centered care, plan strategies to meet my own professional development needs, practice skills to the best of my abilities, analyze problems critically, plan care with other members of the health care team, act on my own decisions related to care giving, identify problems in care giving, coordinate care activities among various health services, adjust plans to meet challenging patient needs, exert authority needed to fulfill patient needs, be creative in care delivery, and introduce new practices and procedures. Implications: Although all rural nurses expressed some satisfaction and control over practice, expert nurses universally reported more control than novices. The reasons experts report stronger satisfaction and control scores are not well understood and require further study.  Relationships among novice practice and satisfaction perceptions need to be found. The findings suggest nurses’ work environments are perceived differently based on experience. Efficient methods of transferring expert knowledge and confidence perceptions to novice nurses need to be implemented as confidence and satisfaction are linked with patient care outcomes.
Keywords:
Novice nurse; Expert nurse; Perceptions; Rural nurse culture
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5035
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleCOMPARISON OF EXPERT AND NOVICE RURAL NURSE JOB SATISFACTION AND CONTROL OVER PRACTICEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211732-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims: The purpose was to compare rural novice and expert perceptions of the workplace, organizational culture, job satisfaction, and control over practice. Rationale: Understanding rural nurse organizational culture and control over practice elements are foundational to program development for increased nurse retention. The literature states turnover during the first year ranges up to 65%. Some states are unable to hire new graduates due to the prevalence of rural facilities; for instance, Montana loses 60% of new graduates to other states. Understanding rural nurse perceptions of work is needed to support practice and recruitment. Methods: Participants in a national residency program completed the McCloskey and Mueller and Gerber Control over Practice surveys online. A total of 118 novice and 60 expert rural nurses from 23 states completed all elements of the surveys. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney tests compared novice and expert answers. Results: There were significant differences in novice and expert job satisfaction from the McCloskey and Mueller Survey.  Salary, vacation, hours worked, flexibility scheduling days, opportunity to work only days, the physicians worked with, opportunities for career advancement, the amount of responsibility received, opportunity to work part time, flexibility in scheduling  weekends, and maternity leave differences were identified. Experts reported higher perceptions of control over practice than novices did in the following areas: The ability to implement nursing care in an efficient manner, provide holistic patient-centered care, plan strategies to meet my own professional development needs, practice skills to the best of my abilities, analyze problems critically, plan care with other members of the health care team, act on my own decisions related to care giving, identify problems in care giving, coordinate care activities among various health services, adjust plans to meet challenging patient needs, exert authority needed to fulfill patient needs, be creative in care delivery, and introduce new practices and procedures. Implications: Although all rural nurses expressed some satisfaction and control over practice, expert nurses universally reported more control than novices. The reasons experts report stronger satisfaction and control scores are not well understood and require further study.  Relationships among novice practice and satisfaction perceptions need to be found. The findings suggest nurses’ work environments are perceived differently based on experience. Efficient methods of transferring expert knowledge and confidence perceptions to novice nurses need to be implemented as confidence and satisfaction are linked with patient care outcomes.en_GB
dc.subjectNovice nurseen_GB
dc.subjectExpert nurseen_GB
dc.subjectPerceptionsen_GB
dc.subjectRural nurse cultureen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:11:04Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:11:04Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:11:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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