2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211733
Type:
Research Study
Title:
BUDDHISM, CHRONIC ILLNESS AND ETHNOGRAPHY: A WAY OF KNOWING in NURSING
Abstract:
This poster portrays an ethnographic research design that aims to explore the role of Buddhist spiritual practice in the chronically ill. Chronic illness has gained vast territory and adapting to a chronic condition has become a reality for many. Several conceptual frameworks, based on the coping theory of Lazarus and Folkman (1984), have guided understanding spiritual coping processes in illness. The concept of spirituality or religion has emerged recurrently in the research in the context of a meaning-making process to cope with illness. The majority of such spirituality research, however, has concentrated on issues related to the Judeo-Christian God, the savior of man. Buddhism places emphasis on conditioning the human mind. The Buddha, the originator of Buddhism was born human, lived as a man, and passed away as a man. The portrayal of Buddhism in spirituality literature is incomplete and far-off from the spiritual practices in Buddhist countries. Thus, this study contributes to filling a gap in spirituality literature by focusing on Buddhist spiritual practices and narrows its scope to explore the chronic illness experience of 30 Sri Lankan Buddhist nuns. It is understood that the healthcare of a chronically ill Sri Lankan Buddhist nun is not an everyday urgent responsibility of the Western nurse. However, nursing scholarship revolves around the factors of person, health, environment, and nursing care. Nursing has a strong focus on the understanding and relief of human suffering and the philosophical basis of Buddhism is also to attain freedom from suffering by understanding what suffering is, its causes, and how to eliminate it. As such, a glimpse at the mental and socio cultural environment of a Buddhist woman whose pain may or may not correspond to relief by an analgesic because of her beliefs and convictions may make us, as health care providers, want to cross national and religious boundaries to learn caring for the person within her reality. Paying attention to other possible ways of knowing through Eastern philosophy can potentially enrich nursing, considering that prevailing Western approaches have not been consistent with the needs and practices of nursing. In this sense, this ethnography that gives insight into social and cultural processes of these women's illness experience can inform theory and model development in nursing. The choice of ethnography as a method to study the phenomenon of Buddhist spiritual practice and chronic illness in Sri Lankan Buddhist nuns is to strike a balance between creating a product that promotes "a way of knowing" for Nursing, and also to provide usable information to other stakeholders whose interests intersect research, practice and policy. In order to ground my findings in the representations of socio-cultural life of Buddhist nuns, I use the recursive and iterative research style of the ethnographer James Spradley (1979, 1980), which includes participant observation, domain, taxonomic, and component analyses to discover cultural themes.  In order to evaluate, and disseminate the findings clearly to an inquiring audience, I supplement my analysis with two visual templates of Matrix Analysis as introduced by Miles and Huberman (1994).
Keywords:
Buddhist Philosophy; Chronic Illness
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4497
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleBUDDHISM, CHRONIC ILLNESS AND ETHNOGRAPHY: A WAY OF KNOWING in NURSINGen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211733-
dc.description.abstractThis poster portrays an ethnographic research design that aims to explore the role of Buddhist spiritual practice in the chronically ill. Chronic illness has gained vast territory and adapting to a chronic condition has become a reality for many. Several conceptual frameworks, based on the coping theory of Lazarus and Folkman (1984), have guided understanding spiritual coping processes in illness. The concept of spirituality or religion has emerged recurrently in the research in the context of a meaning-making process to cope with illness. The majority of such spirituality research, however, has concentrated on issues related to the Judeo-Christian God, the savior of man. Buddhism places emphasis on conditioning the human mind. The Buddha, the originator of Buddhism was born human, lived as a man, and passed away as a man. The portrayal of Buddhism in spirituality literature is incomplete and far-off from the spiritual practices in Buddhist countries. Thus, this study contributes to filling a gap in spirituality literature by focusing on Buddhist spiritual practices and narrows its scope to explore the chronic illness experience of 30 Sri Lankan Buddhist nuns. It is understood that the healthcare of a chronically ill Sri Lankan Buddhist nun is not an everyday urgent responsibility of the Western nurse. However, nursing scholarship revolves around the factors of person, health, environment, and nursing care. Nursing has a strong focus on the understanding and relief of human suffering and the philosophical basis of Buddhism is also to attain freedom from suffering by understanding what suffering is, its causes, and how to eliminate it. As such, a glimpse at the mental and socio cultural environment of a Buddhist woman whose pain may or may not correspond to relief by an analgesic because of her beliefs and convictions may make us, as health care providers, want to cross national and religious boundaries to learn caring for the person within her reality. Paying attention to other possible ways of knowing through Eastern philosophy can potentially enrich nursing, considering that prevailing Western approaches have not been consistent with the needs and practices of nursing. In this sense, this ethnography that gives insight into social and cultural processes of these women's illness experience can inform theory and model development in nursing. The choice of ethnography as a method to study the phenomenon of Buddhist spiritual practice and chronic illness in Sri Lankan Buddhist nuns is to strike a balance between creating a product that promotes "a way of knowing" for Nursing, and also to provide usable information to other stakeholders whose interests intersect research, practice and policy. In order to ground my findings in the representations of socio-cultural life of Buddhist nuns, I use the recursive and iterative research style of the ethnographer James Spradley (1979, 1980), which includes participant observation, domain, taxonomic, and component analyses to discover cultural themes.  In order to evaluate, and disseminate the findings clearly to an inquiring audience, I supplement my analysis with two visual templates of Matrix Analysis as introduced by Miles and Huberman (1994).en_GB
dc.subjectBuddhist Philosophyen_GB
dc.subjectChronic Illnessen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:11:07Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:11:07Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:11:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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