ENSURING ETHNIC REPRESENTATION IN THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY, GRANT COUNTY SAMPLE

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211735
Type:
Research Study
Title:
ENSURING ETHNIC REPRESENTATION IN THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY, GRANT COUNTY SAMPLE
Abstract:
Purpose: The Pacific Northwest Center for the National Children’s Study (NCS) recruited participants from Grant County, WA into the NCS using an Enhanced Household‐Based Recruitment (EHBR) strategy. Ensuring ethnic representation in the sample was a primary goal of recruitment. Background: Grant County is a large (over 2,600 mi2), diverse rural region with low population density (30.8 persons/sq mi). The county has experienced large population growth, with a 19% increase in the overall population and a 51% increase in the Hispanic population. To ensure sample representativeness, specific outreach and engagement strategies were implemented based on cultural responsiveness theory. Methods: Outreach staff was hired locally. A cultural liaison was employed who spoke Spanish and was familiar with organizations serving the Hispanic community. The community advisory committee included representatives from Hispanic organizations. Outreach materials, media, and marketing were personalized and presented in English and Spanish. Targeted outreach events focused on areas with large Hispanic populations. Results: These activities were successful in recruiting Hispanic participants. Current data indicate that 38% of the women who completed the pregnancy screening instrument were Hispanic (expected value is 33%). Consents indicate a higher rate of Hispanic women in the sample (49%) than expected, with the percent of consented women ranging from 3% to over 20% higher than expected over eight segments. When Hispanic women were asked “How did you hear about the NCS?” most respondents replied that they had heard about the NCS through outreach activities, with 29% from media and events. Implications: Employing a conceptual approach to outreach and engagement has led to the successful inclusion of Hispanic women into the NCS. While personalized encounters between researcher and participant can be difficult to implement on a community-wide scale, choices made in outreach, marketing, and media can leverage existing trust and shared values between potential participants and local intermediaries to enhance recruitment. Funding support: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (HHSN275200800015C)
Keywords:
National Children's Study; Ethnic representation
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5085
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleENSURING ETHNIC REPRESENTATION IN THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY, GRANT COUNTY SAMPLEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211735-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The Pacific Northwest Center for the National Children’s Study (NCS) recruited participants from Grant County, WA into the NCS using an Enhanced Household‐Based Recruitment (EHBR) strategy. Ensuring ethnic representation in the sample was a primary goal of recruitment. Background: Grant County is a large (over 2,600 mi2), diverse rural region with low population density (30.8 persons/sq mi). The county has experienced large population growth, with a 19% increase in the overall population and a 51% increase in the Hispanic population. To ensure sample representativeness, specific outreach and engagement strategies were implemented based on cultural responsiveness theory. Methods: Outreach staff was hired locally. A cultural liaison was employed who spoke Spanish and was familiar with organizations serving the Hispanic community. The community advisory committee included representatives from Hispanic organizations. Outreach materials, media, and marketing were personalized and presented in English and Spanish. Targeted outreach events focused on areas with large Hispanic populations. Results: These activities were successful in recruiting Hispanic participants. Current data indicate that 38% of the women who completed the pregnancy screening instrument were Hispanic (expected value is 33%). Consents indicate a higher rate of Hispanic women in the sample (49%) than expected, with the percent of consented women ranging from 3% to over 20% higher than expected over eight segments. When Hispanic women were asked “How did you hear about the NCS?” most respondents replied that they had heard about the NCS through outreach activities, with 29% from media and events. Implications: Employing a conceptual approach to outreach and engagement has led to the successful inclusion of Hispanic women into the NCS. While personalized encounters between researcher and participant can be difficult to implement on a community-wide scale, choices made in outreach, marketing, and media can leverage existing trust and shared values between potential participants and local intermediaries to enhance recruitment. Funding support: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (HHSN275200800015C)en_GB
dc.subjectNational Children's Studyen_GB
dc.subjectEthnic representationen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:11:14Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:11:14Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:11:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.