FEASIBILITY OF A TARGETED BREAST HEALTH INTERVENTION FOR CHINESES IMMIGRANT WOMEN

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211736
Type:
Research Study
Title:
FEASIBILITY OF A TARGETED BREAST HEALTH INTERVENTION FOR CHINESES IMMIGRANT WOMEN
Abstract:
Background: The Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) population is the fastest-growing racial/ethnic population in the U.S. It is predicted that AAPIs will comprise 9 to 10% of the U.S. population by the year 2050. Breast cancer continues to be the most commonly diagnosed cancer among AAPI women. Despite the known benefits of early detection, mammography screening rates among AAPI women are the lowest among all ethnic groups. Aims: Assess the feasibility and acceptability of a theory-based, targeted educational intervention to increase mammography screening among Chinese American women, the largest AAPI subgroups in the U.S. The secondary aims were to assess preliminary effect sizes and to assess the influence of demographics and beliefs on mammogram completion. Feasibility was measured by response rate and intervention completion rate. Acceptability was assessed by process questions related to cultural appropriateness of the content, participants’ response to the content, and intent to change screening behavior. We also assessed changes in the theoretical variables (knowledge, beliefs, and stage of readiness) that were manipulated in the educational program. Methods: Single group (N=44) pre- and post-test pilot study. The 2-part targeted intervention comprised group teaching with targeted messages followed by an individual counseling session. Results: Study response and completion rates were high at 71% and 95%, respectively. The intervention content and setting were well received by the participants. Awareness and knowledge of breast cancer risk and post-treatment survival were low. Colors, graphics and contents were considered very culturally appropriate. The mother, daughter, and grandmother dialogue interactions in the presentation were appreciated. Twelve weeks post intervention, 21 (50%) of the 42 women who completed the study had a mammogram. Seven participants moved two stages from pre-contemplation to action stage. For those in contemplation stage at baseline, twelve moved one stage to action. The top three reasons for not completing a mammogram at the end of the study were “no need/no symptom”, “busy”, and “reliance on family for assistance”. Mean breast cancer susceptibility scores increased significantly at posttest as theorized (t(40)=-2.88, p <.01). Participants were more likely to obtain a mammogram when they had been in the U.S. between 3 and 15 years, and less likely to obtain a mammogram if they had been here less than 3 or greater than 15 years. Implications: Efficacy of this promising intervention is currently being tested using a randomized controlled design, and can be adapted to other AAPI subgroups. A targeted program that aims to increase breast health knowledge, improve access, and remove barriers may promote mammography screening among Chinese and other immigrant women.
Keywords:
Asian American; Pacific Islander; Breast cancer
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5093
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleFEASIBILITY OF A TARGETED BREAST HEALTH INTERVENTION FOR CHINESES IMMIGRANT WOMENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211736-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) population is the fastest-growing racial/ethnic population in the U.S. It is predicted that AAPIs will comprise 9 to 10% of the U.S. population by the year 2050. Breast cancer continues to be the most commonly diagnosed cancer among AAPI women. Despite the known benefits of early detection, mammography screening rates among AAPI women are the lowest among all ethnic groups. Aims: Assess the feasibility and acceptability of a theory-based, targeted educational intervention to increase mammography screening among Chinese American women, the largest AAPI subgroups in the U.S. The secondary aims were to assess preliminary effect sizes and to assess the influence of demographics and beliefs on mammogram completion. Feasibility was measured by response rate and intervention completion rate. Acceptability was assessed by process questions related to cultural appropriateness of the content, participants’ response to the content, and intent to change screening behavior. We also assessed changes in the theoretical variables (knowledge, beliefs, and stage of readiness) that were manipulated in the educational program. Methods: Single group (N=44) pre- and post-test pilot study. The 2-part targeted intervention comprised group teaching with targeted messages followed by an individual counseling session. Results: Study response and completion rates were high at 71% and 95%, respectively. The intervention content and setting were well received by the participants. Awareness and knowledge of breast cancer risk and post-treatment survival were low. Colors, graphics and contents were considered very culturally appropriate. The mother, daughter, and grandmother dialogue interactions in the presentation were appreciated. Twelve weeks post intervention, 21 (50%) of the 42 women who completed the study had a mammogram. Seven participants moved two stages from pre-contemplation to action stage. For those in contemplation stage at baseline, twelve moved one stage to action. The top three reasons for not completing a mammogram at the end of the study were “no need/no symptom”, “busy”, and “reliance on family for assistance”. Mean breast cancer susceptibility scores increased significantly at posttest as theorized (t(40)=-2.88, p <.01). Participants were more likely to obtain a mammogram when they had been in the U.S. between 3 and 15 years, and less likely to obtain a mammogram if they had been here less than 3 or greater than 15 years. Implications: Efficacy of this promising intervention is currently being tested using a randomized controlled design, and can be adapted to other AAPI subgroups. A targeted program that aims to increase breast health knowledge, improve access, and remove barriers may promote mammography screening among Chinese and other immigrant women.en_GB
dc.subjectAsian Americanen_GB
dc.subjectPacific Islanderen_GB
dc.subjectBreast canceren_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:11:18Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:11:18Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:11:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.