QIGONG AS A NOVEL INTERVENTION FOR SERVICE MEMBERS WITH MILD TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211738
Type:
Research Study
Title:
QIGONG AS A NOVEL INTERVENTION FOR SERVICE MEMBERS WITH MILD TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this study was to explore the interest in and utility of an 8-week internal qigong intervention in service members diagnosed with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Gaining insight into the interest, effects of, and adherence to a qigong intervention from the service member’s perspective is a first step toward the long-term goal of establishing a program of research using non-pharmacologic interventions such as qigong for management of symptoms related to mTBI. Background: Over the past decade, traumatic brain injury (TBI) has evolved into the signature injury for service members returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The attention being given to mTBI is greater than it has ever been when compared to previous conflicts. Because of the nature of the blast injuries occurring on the battlefields in Iraq and Afghanistan, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of service members with mTBI have proven to be challenging and often incomplete, leading the military medical community to seek new and innovative approaches to the long-term management of mTBI. One novel therapy that has shown potential in reducing stress and improving quality of life issues similar to those seen in service members with mTBI is qigong, an ancient Chinese healing art that involves focusing the individual’s internal energy towards balance and wellness through the use of slow, deliberate movements, diaphragmatic breathing, and meditation. Methods: This study used a qualitative descriptive phenomenological analysis. A total of six service members with mTBI who were receiving outpatient neuro-rehabilitation at the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Centers–Charlottesville Rehabilitation Program (DVBIC–Charlottesville) were interviewed halfway through the qigong intervention, then again at the end of the 8 weeks of formal instruction. The interviews focused on the service members’ interest in and the utility of this ancient art.  Interview data were analyzed using methods originally described by Husserl and later refined by Giorgi. Results:  Findings from the interviews revealed a dramatic change in the attitudes of the participants following the practice of qigong over the 8 weeks. Four themes emerged and included, “the physical experience of qigong,” “regaining control,” “no pain, a lot of gain,” and “barriers to practice of qigong.” Participants offered profound examples of how qigong enabled them to take control of their symptoms and their general outlook on the future. Their perceptions were that qigong was conducive to the highly disciplined mindset of military service members. They also believed that the simplicity of qigong, when compared to similar modalities such as tai chi and yoga, was well suited to individuals with symptoms related to mTBI who may be limited by decreased balance, cognition and memory. Implications: This pilot study strongly supports additional research into the effects of the practice of qigong in service members with mTBI. Specifically, research could be directed not just at overall well-being associated with practice, but to the phenomenon of using qigong to address symptom management through promotion of empowerment and control in a population for whom elements of control have been lost following a brain injury.
Keywords:
Mild traumatic brain injury; Intervention; Military
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5096
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleQIGONG AS A NOVEL INTERVENTION FOR SERVICE MEMBERS WITH MILD TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211738-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims: The purpose of this study was to explore the interest in and utility of an 8-week internal qigong intervention in service members diagnosed with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Gaining insight into the interest, effects of, and adherence to a qigong intervention from the service member’s perspective is a first step toward the long-term goal of establishing a program of research using non-pharmacologic interventions such as qigong for management of symptoms related to mTBI. Background: Over the past decade, traumatic brain injury (TBI) has evolved into the signature injury for service members returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The attention being given to mTBI is greater than it has ever been when compared to previous conflicts. Because of the nature of the blast injuries occurring on the battlefields in Iraq and Afghanistan, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of service members with mTBI have proven to be challenging and often incomplete, leading the military medical community to seek new and innovative approaches to the long-term management of mTBI. One novel therapy that has shown potential in reducing stress and improving quality of life issues similar to those seen in service members with mTBI is qigong, an ancient Chinese healing art that involves focusing the individual’s internal energy towards balance and wellness through the use of slow, deliberate movements, diaphragmatic breathing, and meditation. Methods: This study used a qualitative descriptive phenomenological analysis. A total of six service members with mTBI who were receiving outpatient neuro-rehabilitation at the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Centers–Charlottesville Rehabilitation Program (DVBIC–Charlottesville) were interviewed halfway through the qigong intervention, then again at the end of the 8 weeks of formal instruction. The interviews focused on the service members’ interest in and the utility of this ancient art.  Interview data were analyzed using methods originally described by Husserl and later refined by Giorgi. Results:  Findings from the interviews revealed a dramatic change in the attitudes of the participants following the practice of qigong over the 8 weeks. Four themes emerged and included, “the physical experience of qigong,” “regaining control,” “no pain, a lot of gain,” and “barriers to practice of qigong.” Participants offered profound examples of how qigong enabled them to take control of their symptoms and their general outlook on the future. Their perceptions were that qigong was conducive to the highly disciplined mindset of military service members. They also believed that the simplicity of qigong, when compared to similar modalities such as tai chi and yoga, was well suited to individuals with symptoms related to mTBI who may be limited by decreased balance, cognition and memory. Implications: This pilot study strongly supports additional research into the effects of the practice of qigong in service members with mTBI. Specifically, research could be directed not just at overall well-being associated with practice, but to the phenomenon of using qigong to address symptom management through promotion of empowerment and control in a population for whom elements of control have been lost following a brain injury.en_GB
dc.subjectMild traumatic brain injuryen_GB
dc.subjectInterventionen_GB
dc.subjectMilitaryen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:11:24Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:11:24Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:11:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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