2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211740
Type:
Research Study
Title:
RISKING UNINTENDED PREGNANCY, HIV AND STIs AMONG METHAMPHETAMINE-USING WOMEN
Abstract:
Purpose: To describe the contextual factors and perceptions of methamphetamine-related behaviors that influence sexual risk for unintended pregnancy, HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STI) among methamphetamine-using women. Background: Among methamphetamine users, the gender ratio is equal between women and men, but women start using at a slightly younger age and have more complex psychosocial problems due to childhood traumas. As a potent long-acting stimulant, methamphetamine's neurobiological effects last for eight to twelve hours, during which users describe euphoria, increased energy, decreased appetite, and enhanced sexual desire. Research has identified an independent association of the drug and sexual activity and likelihood for sexual encounters to occur while under the influence of methamphetamine. Descriptive studies report high frequency of risky sexual behaviors that are practiced by heterosexual users, including: unprotected vaginal intercourse, receptive anal intercourse, and sexual encounters with multiple intimate or anonymous partners. Methamphetamine use poses gender-specific risks for women who become regular users of the drug, especially related to sexual risk for pregnancy, HIV, and sexually transmitted infections. Method: Passive recruitment was conducted by flyer placement in southern California drug treatment facilities, WIC sites, and a maternal-fetal medicine practice seeking participation by pregnant or postpartum women who used methamphetamine during a portion of their pregnancy. Eligible candidates were 18 years of age or older, English speaking, and claimed methamphetamine was their primary drug of choice. A sample of 17 participants self-identified as White, Hispanic, mixed race Hispanic and Asian, ranged in age from 18 to 37 years of age; four were married, and all were unemployed. Under the protection of a Certificate of Confidentiality, one or two audio taped, semi-structured interviews were conducted regarding their lives before pregnancy, methamphetamine use, and their experience of pregnancy. Using Constructivist Grounded Theory and the symbolic interactionism for understanding meaning-making, simultaneous data collection and analysis was conducted. Findings: The women reported initiation to methamphetamine averaging at 15.8 years of age and half of the sample had a first pregnancy by the age of 16. They had minimal knowledge of and exposure to reproductive education or services; thus, they chose not to use contraception and voiced no concern for sexual risk with multiple partners. From their description of sexual behaviors surrounding methamphetamine use, a core category, Risking unintended pregnancy, HIV, and STI emerged with four categories of factors that contribute to understanding the participants’ sexual risk-taking: seeking sexual satisfaction, gambling with sexuality, fulfilling intrapersonal needs, and using sex as a commodity. Implications: The process contributes to understanding the complex relationship between methamphetamine and sexuality among female users. The findings point to the need for early timing of supportive interventions, including psychological counseling with adolescents regarding adverse childhood traumas, introduction to reproductive services, contraceptive education, and ongoing availability of appropriate resources into adulthood. Further research with a broader population of methamphetamine users remains critical.
Keywords:
Methamphetamine use; Women; sexual risk
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5106
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleRISKING UNINTENDED PREGNANCY, HIV AND STIs AMONG METHAMPHETAMINE-USING WOMENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211740-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To describe the contextual factors and perceptions of methamphetamine-related behaviors that influence sexual risk for unintended pregnancy, HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STI) among methamphetamine-using women. Background: Among methamphetamine users, the gender ratio is equal between women and men, but women start using at a slightly younger age and have more complex psychosocial problems due to childhood traumas. As a potent long-acting stimulant, methamphetamine's neurobiological effects last for eight to twelve hours, during which users describe euphoria, increased energy, decreased appetite, and enhanced sexual desire. Research has identified an independent association of the drug and sexual activity and likelihood for sexual encounters to occur while under the influence of methamphetamine. Descriptive studies report high frequency of risky sexual behaviors that are practiced by heterosexual users, including: unprotected vaginal intercourse, receptive anal intercourse, and sexual encounters with multiple intimate or anonymous partners. Methamphetamine use poses gender-specific risks for women who become regular users of the drug, especially related to sexual risk for pregnancy, HIV, and sexually transmitted infections. Method: Passive recruitment was conducted by flyer placement in southern California drug treatment facilities, WIC sites, and a maternal-fetal medicine practice seeking participation by pregnant or postpartum women who used methamphetamine during a portion of their pregnancy. Eligible candidates were 18 years of age or older, English speaking, and claimed methamphetamine was their primary drug of choice. A sample of 17 participants self-identified as White, Hispanic, mixed race Hispanic and Asian, ranged in age from 18 to 37 years of age; four were married, and all were unemployed. Under the protection of a Certificate of Confidentiality, one or two audio taped, semi-structured interviews were conducted regarding their lives before pregnancy, methamphetamine use, and their experience of pregnancy. Using Constructivist Grounded Theory and the symbolic interactionism for understanding meaning-making, simultaneous data collection and analysis was conducted. Findings: The women reported initiation to methamphetamine averaging at 15.8 years of age and half of the sample had a first pregnancy by the age of 16. They had minimal knowledge of and exposure to reproductive education or services; thus, they chose not to use contraception and voiced no concern for sexual risk with multiple partners. From their description of sexual behaviors surrounding methamphetamine use, a core category, Risking unintended pregnancy, HIV, and STI emerged with four categories of factors that contribute to understanding the participants’ sexual risk-taking: seeking sexual satisfaction, gambling with sexuality, fulfilling intrapersonal needs, and using sex as a commodity. Implications: The process contributes to understanding the complex relationship between methamphetamine and sexuality among female users. The findings point to the need for early timing of supportive interventions, including psychological counseling with adolescents regarding adverse childhood traumas, introduction to reproductive services, contraceptive education, and ongoing availability of appropriate resources into adulthood. Further research with a broader population of methamphetamine users remains critical.en_GB
dc.subjectMethamphetamine useen_GB
dc.subjectWomenen_GB
dc.subjectsexual risken_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:11:31Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:11:31Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:11:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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