2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211742
Type:
Research Study
Title:
A CASE STUDY OF MIDWIFERY in MANITOBA
Abstract:
Background.  In 2000, midwifery was regulated in the Canadian province of Manitoba.  Since the inception of the midwifery program, little research has been done to analyze the utilization of regulated midwifery services.  Currently, many women are denied access to midwifery care due to the shortage of midwives in Manitoba.  Key components of the original implementation plan for midwifery have not met projected targets, including a lower than projected number of midwives and midwifery births.  Furthermore, a lack of successful educational programs and lack of funded positions have contributed to the shortage of midwives. Purpose. The purpose of this study is (1) To describe the utilization of midwifery health care services in Manitoba from 2000/2001 to 2009/2010 and; (2) To explore factors influencing the utilization of regulated midwifery services in Manitoba. Conceptual Model. The Behavioral Model of Health Services will be used to conceptualize factors that impact the utilization of midwifery services in Manitoba.  The goal of this framework is to demonstrate how predisposing, enabling, and need factors are interrelated in regards to health care utilization.  A feminist framework will be applied in this study to draw on the insights and struggles of the midwifery profession in Manitoba.  The relevance of a feminist framework in midwifery is to examine the issues and practices of a situation in relation to how they influence women’s lives and experiences. Methods. This study will use a case study design.  The unit for analysis or the single case to be studied is regulated midwifery services in Manitoba.  Both qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection will be used. The case study evidence will be derived from three sources; documents, administrative data and interviews. The quantitative analysis will be done using population-based administrative data from the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, to study the utilization of midwifery care in Manitoba between 2001/02 to 2009/10 (e.g., trends in number of midwives, proportion of births attended by midwives, geographic distribution of midwifery services).  Document analysis (e.g., reports, minutes, archived documents) and the long interview method with key informants will be used to gather the qualitative data in this case study.   Interviews will be audiotaped and transcribed; content analysis will be used to identify themes arising from the data. Implications. In spite of scientific evidence that supports the midwifery model of care, there remains an inherent struggle to justify and sustain the profession globally.  Although Canada has implemented a direct entry midwifery model, other areas of the world including the U.S. also have a nurse midwifery model.  The findings will have implications for maternal/child health professionals to work at improving collaborative efforts to facilitate access to midwifery services for women who would like the choice of midwifery care.
Keywords:
Midwifery, Regulation
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5119
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleA CASE STUDY OF MIDWIFERY in MANITOBAen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211742-
dc.description.abstractBackground.  In 2000, midwifery was regulated in the Canadian province of Manitoba.  Since the inception of the midwifery program, little research has been done to analyze the utilization of regulated midwifery services.  Currently, many women are denied access to midwifery care due to the shortage of midwives in Manitoba.  Key components of the original implementation plan for midwifery have not met projected targets, including a lower than projected number of midwives and midwifery births.  Furthermore, a lack of successful educational programs and lack of funded positions have contributed to the shortage of midwives. Purpose. The purpose of this study is (1) To describe the utilization of midwifery health care services in Manitoba from 2000/2001 to 2009/2010 and; (2) To explore factors influencing the utilization of regulated midwifery services in Manitoba. Conceptual Model. The Behavioral Model of Health Services will be used to conceptualize factors that impact the utilization of midwifery services in Manitoba.  The goal of this framework is to demonstrate how predisposing, enabling, and need factors are interrelated in regards to health care utilization.  A feminist framework will be applied in this study to draw on the insights and struggles of the midwifery profession in Manitoba.  The relevance of a feminist framework in midwifery is to examine the issues and practices of a situation in relation to how they influence women’s lives and experiences. Methods. This study will use a case study design.  The unit for analysis or the single case to be studied is regulated midwifery services in Manitoba.  Both qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection will be used. The case study evidence will be derived from three sources; documents, administrative data and interviews. The quantitative analysis will be done using population-based administrative data from the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, to study the utilization of midwifery care in Manitoba between 2001/02 to 2009/10 (e.g., trends in number of midwives, proportion of births attended by midwives, geographic distribution of midwifery services).  Document analysis (e.g., reports, minutes, archived documents) and the long interview method with key informants will be used to gather the qualitative data in this case study.   Interviews will be audiotaped and transcribed; content analysis will be used to identify themes arising from the data. Implications. In spite of scientific evidence that supports the midwifery model of care, there remains an inherent struggle to justify and sustain the profession globally.  Although Canada has implemented a direct entry midwifery model, other areas of the world including the U.S. also have a nurse midwifery model.  The findings will have implications for maternal/child health professionals to work at improving collaborative efforts to facilitate access to midwifery services for women who would like the choice of midwifery care.en_GB
dc.subjectMidwifery, Regulationen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:11:38Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:11:38Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:11:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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