2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/237411
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Practice Innovation
Title:
Self-Care in African Americans with Heart Failure
Author(s):
Woda, Aimee
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Gamma-at-Large
Author Details:
To visit Dr. Woda's faculty page please copy and paste the following link into your web browser: http://www.marquette.edu/nursing/faculty-Woda.shtml
Abstract:
Aimee Woda, PhD (c), RN, BC
Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Self-Care in African Americans with Heart Failure


Purpose: To gain a better understanding of the subjective experience of low-income, urban, African Americans over the age of 50 with HF. Outlining both the perceived facilitators and barriers related to engaging in HF self-care behaviors.

Theoretical Framework: The theoretical framework for this study is founded on the principles of education for critical consciousness as written by Paulo Freire. 

Methods, procedures and sampling: This study utilized a mixed methods descriptive research design to implement the photovoice intervention. Ten low-income African Americans with Heart Failure were recruited from three public housing buildings. The participants’ mean age was 67.5. Seven participants were female. The number of years they have lived with HF ranged from 4-9 years; two participants did not know how long they had been diagnosed with HF. Their average annual income was $13,537. Participants were provided with digital cameras and instructed to take photographs of what they do to take care of themselves, what makes it easy, and what makes it difficult. The participants and the researcher met for two hours per week for six weeks to discuss the photographs that were taken each week. Additionally, participants completed the Personal Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) depression severity screening tool and the Self-Care Heart Failure Index (SCHFI) in week 1 and week 6.

Summary of findings: Participants identified that they consistently engaged in the self-care maintenance behaviors of adhering to medications, following dietary restrictions, and participating in daily physical activity. Three themes emerged concerning the facilitators: family support gives me the push I need, social interaction lifts me up, and support in my environment has allowed me to better my condition. An additional sub-theme—personal benefits of the environment—was identified within the third theme. Four other themes emerged regarding the barriers: depression slows my heart down, interruption in health care provider, neglected environment, and dietary challenges. The findings from this study provide a deep understanding of the importance of social support from family, friends, and health care providers in improving self-care maintenance behaviors. Barriers such as depression, lack of physician support, stress in the immediate environment, and the cost of healthy food were identified and described as being associated with decreasing engagement in self-care maintenance.

Recommendations: The findings from this study may assist nurses in understanding the complexity of self-care among low-income African Americans living in urban settings. Understanding individual self-care behaviors, facilitators, and barriers of those with Heart Failure can lead to the development of appropriate patient-centered assessments and interventions.
 
Testimonial: Receiving the Sigma Theta Tau grant facilitated the completion of this study, allowing me to purchase reliable equipment, provide compensation for the participants, and provide healthy food items during group discussions. These funds made it possible for data collection to be completed within a one-year time frame.
Keywords:
Heart Failure; Self Care; African American
Repository Posting Date:
6-Aug-2012
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Note:
The Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.; This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryAbstracten
dc.typePractice Innovationen
dc.titleSelf-Care in African Americans with Heart Failureen_US
dc.contributor.authorWoda, Aimee-
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Gamma-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsTo visit Dr. Woda's faculty page please copy and paste the following link into your web browser: http://www.marquette.edu/nursing/faculty-Woda.shtmlen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/237411-
dc.description.abstract<b>Aimee Woda, PhD (c), RN, BC</br> Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin</br> Self-Care in African Americans with Heart Failure</b></br> </br> <b>Purpose:</b> To gain a better understanding of the subjective experience of low-income, urban, African Americans over the age of 50 with HF. Outlining both the perceived facilitators and barriers related to engaging in HF self-care behaviors.</br> </br><b>Theoretical Framework:</b> The theoretical framework for this study is founded on the principles of education for critical consciousness as written by Paulo Freire. </br> </br> <b>Methods, procedures and sampling:</b> This study utilized a mixed methods descriptive research design to implement the photovoice intervention. Ten low-income African Americans with Heart Failure were recruited from three public housing buildings. The participants’ mean age was 67.5. Seven participants were female. The number of years they have lived with HF ranged from 4-9 years; two participants did not know how long they had been diagnosed with HF. Their average annual income was $13,537. Participants were provided with digital cameras and instructed to take photographs of what they do to take care of themselves, what makes it easy, and what makes it difficult. The participants and the researcher met for two hours per week for six weeks to discuss the photographs that were taken each week. Additionally, participants completed the Personal Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) depression severity screening tool and the Self-Care Heart Failure Index (SCHFI) in week 1 and week 6. </br></br> <b>Summary of findings:</b> Participants identified that they consistently engaged in the self-care maintenance behaviors of adhering to medications, following dietary restrictions, and participating in daily physical activity. Three themes emerged concerning the facilitators: family support gives me the push I need, social interaction lifts me up, and support in my environment has allowed me to better my condition. An additional sub-theme—personal benefits of the environment—was identified within the third theme. Four other themes emerged regarding the barriers: depression slows my heart down, interruption in health care provider, neglected environment, and dietary challenges. The findings from this study provide a deep understanding of the importance of social support from family, friends, and health care providers in improving self-care maintenance behaviors. Barriers such as depression, lack of physician support, stress in the immediate environment, and the cost of healthy food were identified and described as being associated with decreasing engagement in self-care maintenance. </br></br> <b>Recommendations:</b> The findings from this study may assist nurses in understanding the complexity of self-care among low-income African Americans living in urban settings. Understanding individual self-care behaviors, facilitators, and barriers of those with Heart Failure can lead to the development of appropriate patient-centered assessments and interventions.</br>  </br> <b>Testimonial:</b> Receiving the Sigma Theta Tau grant facilitated the completion of this study, allowing me to purchase reliable equipment, provide compensation for the participants, and provide healthy food items during group discussions. These funds made it possible for data collection to be completed within a one-year time frame.en_GB
dc.subjectHeart Failureen_GB
dc.subjectSelf Careen_GB
dc.subjectAfrican Americanen_GB
dc.date.available2012-08-06T19:18:20Z-
dc.date.issued2012-08-06-
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-06T19:18:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.description.noteThe Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.en
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item.-
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