2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/238259
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Research Study
Title:
New Nurses' Hopes and Expectations Transitioning into Nursing Practice
Author(s):
Gwinn, Linda; Marks, Angie; Hoeksel, Renee
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Chi-at-Large
Author Details:
Linda C. Gwinn MN, RN, PHCNS-BC, CCRN Email: tandlgwinn@tds.net
Abstract:

NEW NURSES’ HOPES AND EXPECTATIONS TRANSITIONING INTO NURSING PRACTICE 

 

Linda Gwinn, MN, RN-C

Instructor

College of Nursing

Washington State University

Vancouver. WA

 

Angie Marks, MN, RN                       Renee Hoeksel, PhD, RN

Instructor                                            Professor

Department of Nursing                            College of Nursing

           Clark College                       Washington State University

         Vancouver, WA                                Vancouver, WA

 

Purposes/Aims: This qualitative study examines the lived experiences of graduating associate degree nurses transitioning into practice. The purpose of this presentation is to examine the results of study Phase One where the specific aim was to describe the hopes and expectations of these graduating students as they anticipate transitioning into nursing practice. Rationale Conceptual Basis/Background: The increasing complexity and dynamic nature of nursing practice has been well described in the professional literature and recognized by schools of nursing as well as the healthcare industry. Increasing attention is being paid to the gap that newly graduated nurses experience as they transition from school into nursing roles across practice settings. Nurse educators are revising curriculum to best prepare graduates for entry into an ever-evolving and often chaotic work environment. Nurse administrators and managers are implementing extended orientation and residency/internship programs all in an effort to successfully bridge this gap. Barriers for new graduate nurses transitioning into practice are well documented. However, research examining hopes and expectations at graduation, especially in the United States, is sparse. Efforts to systematically study new nurses longitudinally are even rarer. Methods: A 2-phase longitudinal research study was designed using an interpretive, hermeneutic, qualitative design. The first phase, reported here, utilized four focus groups of last quarter students in two regional associate degree nursing programs. Each focus group consisted of 4-10 students (total n=27) and was facilitated by two researchers, one to lead the group and one to take field notes and manage equipment. All group tape recordings were transcribed verbatim and entered into Ethnograph 6.The research team consisted of faculty from university and associate degree programs. Results: Several categories were identified from the transcripts of all four groups which then led to the emerging themes of surprise, dichotomy, and resolve. Students were surprised that within the context of a poor economy, seeking a job could be more challenging and competitive than admission to nursing school. An example of dichotomy was that on one hand students felt ready to “jump in and hit the floor running” yet felt unprepared for the many responsibilities of the registered nurse role. In terms of resolve participants identified barriers they described as “scary, yet repeatedly voiced “…dedication to overcome any obstacles to get your goal accomplished…” Implications: Internships or residency programs are desirable as seen through the eyes of study participants. Partnerships between schools of nursing and employers of nurses need to continue efforts to build bridges to ease this transition period of vulnerability for both the graduate and the patients assigned to their care. Faculty need to attend to the worries of the students and perhaps put more emphasis through seminars or curriculum on preparation for successful job searches, interview tips, resume writing, especially in the last 2 terms before graduation. Increased research especially longitudinal efforts in different regions of the country are necessary if Best Practices are to be developed aimed at improved nurse satisfaction, nurse retention, and most importantly, quality patient outcomes. Funded by 2010 Sigma Theta Tau International/Western Institute of Nursing Research Grant.

Keywords:
Transition to practice; Hope; Expectations; Graduate Nurse
Repository Posting Date:
13-Aug-2012
Date of Publication:
13-Aug-2012
Conference Date:
2012
Conference Name:
2012 Communicating Nursing Research Conference
Conference Host:
Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Location:
Portland, Oregon, USA
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International; Western Institute of Nursing
Note:
The Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.; The abstract for Phase Two of this study is available at: http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/312701 (Please cut and paste the link into your browser's address field.); This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryAbstracten
dc.typeResearch Studyen
dc.titleNew Nurses' Hopes and Expectations Transitioning into Nursing Practiceen_US
dc.contributor.authorGwinn, Linda-
dc.contributor.authorMarks, Angie-
dc.contributor.authorHoeksel, Renee-
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Chi-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsLinda C. Gwinn MN, RN, PHCNS-BC, CCRN Email: tandlgwinn@tds.neten
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/238259-
dc.description.abstract<p align="center"><strong>NEW NURSES’ HOPES AND EXPECTATIONS TRANSITIONING INTO NURSING PRACTICE  </strong></p> <p><strong> </strong></p> <p align="center">Linda Gwinn, MN, RN-C</p> <p align="center">Instructor</p> <p align="center">College of Nursing</p> <p align="center">Washington State University</p> <p align="center">Vancouver. WA</p> <p align="center"><strong> </strong></p> <p align="center">Angie Marks, MN, RN                       Renee Hoeksel, PhD, RN</p> <p>Instructor                                            Professor</p> <p>Department of Nursing                            College of Nursing</p> <p>           Clark College                       Washington State University</p> <p>         Vancouver, WA                                Vancouver, WA</p> <p><strong> </strong></p> <p><strong><em>Purposes/Aims: </em></strong>This qualitative study examines the lived experiences of graduating associate degree nurses transitioning into practice. The purpose of this presentation is to examine the results of study Phase One where the specific aim was to describe the hopes and expectations of these graduating students as they anticipate transitioning into nursing practice. <strong><em>Rationale Conceptual Basis/Background: </em></strong>The increasing complexity and dynamic nature of nursing practice has been well described in the professional literature and recognized by schools of nursing as well as the healthcare industry. Increasing attention is being paid to the gap that newly graduated nurses experience as they transition from school into nursing roles across practice settings. Nurse educators are revising curriculum to best prepare graduates for entry into an ever-evolving and often chaotic work environment. Nurse administrators and managers are implementing extended orientation and residency/internship programs all in an effort to successfully bridge this gap. Barriers for new graduate nurses transitioning into practice are well documented. However, research examining hopes and expectations at graduation, especially in the United States, is sparse. Efforts to systematically study new nurses longitudinally are even rarer. <strong><em>Methods: </em></strong>A 2-phase longitudinal research study was designed using an interpretive, hermeneutic, qualitative design. The first phase, reported here, utilized four focus groups of last quarter students in two regional associate degree nursing programs. Each focus group consisted of 4-10 students (total n=27) and was facilitated by two researchers, one to lead the group and one to take field notes and manage equipment. All group tape recordings were transcribed verbatim and entered into Ethnograph 6.The research team consisted of faculty from university and associate degree programs. <strong><em>Results: </em></strong>Several categories were identified from the transcripts of all four groups which then led to the emerging themes of surprise, dichotomy, and resolve. Students were surprised that within the context of a poor economy, seeking a job could be more challenging and competitive than admission to nursing school. An example of dichotomy was that on one hand students felt ready to “jump in and hit the floor running” yet felt unprepared for the many responsibilities of the registered nurse role. In terms of resolve participants identified barriers they described as “scary, yet repeatedly voiced “…dedication to overcome any obstacles to get your goal accomplished…” <strong><em>Implications: </em></strong>Internships or residency programs are desirable as seen through the eyes of study participants. Partnerships between schools of nursing and employers of nurses need to continue efforts to build bridges to ease this transition period of vulnerability for both the graduate and the patients assigned to their care. Faculty need to attend to the worries of the students and perhaps put more emphasis through seminars or curriculum on preparation for successful job searches, interview tips, resume writing, especially in the last 2 terms before graduation. Increased research especially longitudinal efforts in different regions of the country are necessary if Best Practices are to be developed aimed at improved nurse satisfaction, nurse retention, and most importantly, quality patient outcomes. Funded by <em>2010 Sigma Theta Tau International/Western Institute of Nursing Research Grant</em><em>.</em></p>en_GB
dc.subjectTransition to practiceen_GB
dc.subjectHopeen_GB
dc.subjectExpectationsen_GB
dc.subjectGraduate Nurseen_GB
dc.date.available2012-08-13T14:08:09Z-
dc.date.issued2012-08-13-
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-13T14:08:09Z-
dc.conference.date2012en
dc.conference.name2012 Communicating Nursing Research Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPortland, Oregon, USAen_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen
dc.description.noteThe Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.en
dc.description.noteThe abstract for Phase Two of this study is available at: http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/312701 (Please cut and paste the link into your browser's address field.)en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.