Knowledge Attitudes and Beliefs Regarding Cervical Cancer and screening and perceived barriers of cervical cancer Screening Programs Among Thai Immigrant Women Living in Germany

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/239753
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Research Study
Title:
Knowledge Attitudes and Beliefs Regarding Cervical Cancer and screening and perceived barriers of cervical cancer Screening Programs Among Thai Immigrant Women Living in Germany
Author(s):
Ice, Unchalee
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Theta Omicron
Author Details:
Email: uice@salud.unm.edu
Abstract:

Since the introduction of the national cervical cancer screening in the 1960s and 1970s, in most western European nations, the mortality rates for cervical cancer have decreased significantly. The countries of the European Union (EU) employ both opportunistic and organized screening programs for cervical cancer using Pap smears as the method of screening. However, data showed in 2000, that Germany had a considerably higher incidence of cervical cancer mortality than the EU. Study findings in the United States, Australia, and Thailand indicated that participation of Thai women was suboptimal even in the more organized screening programs such as Australia’s cervical cancer screening program. The purpose of this study was to target an already at risk population of first generation Thai immigrant women living in Germany, and to describe their knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding cervical cancer, screening and the barriers to participation in screening they encounter. A focused ethnography was conducted in the Federal State of Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany, to answer the following 4 research questions: (a)what is the cervical cancer knowledge and attitudes of Thai women living in Germany?; (b) what are the health beliefs and practices regarding cervical cancer among Thai women living in Germany?; (c) what are the cervical cancer screening practices among Thai women in Germany?; (d) what are the barriers to participation in cervical cancer screening perceived by Thai women living in Germany? The Health Belief Model (HBM) provided the theoretical guidance for the development of the research questions and the interview guide which was used in the interviews. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews conducted with 30 Thai immigrant women (age 22-56) and two practicing German health care providers, a gynecologist, and a registered nurse. Data was analyzed inductively through the process of Immersion and Crystallization. The findings indicated that all participants had heard about cervical cancer screening from a variety of sources and described their knowledge of cervical cancer based on personal, traditional and clinical knowledge. Participants integrated both traditional and modern health beliefs and practices which influenced their cervical cancer screening practices. In terms of personal and modern health beliefs and practices of cervical cancer prevention, participants offered an array of health practices including having a yearly Pap test. All participants in this study had health insurance, and the majority had screening done as part of their yearly physical exam. System, personal, and cultural barriers were identified within the health care system; age, levels of education and socio-economic status did not seem to be factors in participating in screening, whereas having health insurance seemed to increase incentive. The findings from this study may assist German health care providers to gain insight and deeper understanding of the cultural implications and barriers that may prevent Thai women from seeking early screening, thus, having a direct impact on Thai immigrant women’s preventative health.

Keywords:
cervical cancer screening; Knowledge, Attitudes, Beliefs; Cervical cancer; Thai immigrant women; Germany
Repository Posting Date:
23-Aug-2012
Date of Publication:
23-Aug-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Note:
The Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.; This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryAbstracten
dc.typeResearch Studyen
dc.titleKnowledge Attitudes and Beliefs Regarding Cervical Cancer and screening and perceived barriers of cervical cancer Screening Programs Among Thai Immigrant Women Living in Germanyen_US
dc.contributor.authorIce, Unchalee-
dc.contributor.departmentTheta Omicronen
dc.author.detailsEmail: uice@salud.unm.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/239753-
dc.description.abstract<p>Since the introduction of the national cervical cancer screening in the 1960s and 1970s, in most western European nations, the mortality rates for cervical cancer have decreased significantly. The countries of the European Union (EU) employ both opportunistic and organized screening programs for cervical cancer using Pap smears as the method of screening. However, data showed in 2000, that Germany had a considerably higher incidence of cervical cancer mortality than the EU. Study findings in the United States, Australia, and Thailand indicated that participation of Thai women was suboptimal even in the more organized screening programs such as Australia’s cervical cancer screening program. The purpose of this study was to target an already at risk population of first generation Thai immigrant women living in Germany, and to describe their knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding cervical cancer, screening and the barriers to participation in screening they encounter. A focused ethnography was conducted in the Federal State of Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany, to answer the following 4 research questions: (a)what is the cervical cancer knowledge and attitudes of Thai women living in Germany?; (b) what are the health beliefs and practices regarding cervical cancer among Thai women living in Germany?; (c) what are the cervical cancer screening practices among Thai women in Germany?; (d) what are the barriers to participation in cervical cancer screening perceived by Thai women living in Germany? The Health Belief Model (HBM) provided the theoretical guidance<strong> </strong>for the development of the research questions and the interview guide which was used in the interviews. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews conducted with 30 Thai immigrant women (age 22-56) and two practicing German health care providers, a gynecologist, and a registered nurse. Data was analyzed inductively through the process of Immersion and Crystallization. The findings indicated that all participants had heard about cervical cancer screening from a variety of sources and described their knowledge of cervical cancer based on personal, traditional and clinical knowledge. Participants integrated both traditional and modern health beliefs and practices which influenced their cervical cancer screening practices. In terms of personal and modern health beliefs and practices of cervical cancer prevention, participants offered an array of health practices including having a yearly Pap test. All participants in this study had health insurance, and the majority had screening done as part of their yearly physical exam. System, personal, and cultural barriers were identified within the health care system; age, levels of education and socio-economic status did not seem to be factors in participating in screening, whereas having health insurance seemed to increase incentive. The findings from this study may<strong> </strong>assist German health care providers to gain insight and deeper understanding of the cultural implications and barriers that may prevent Thai women from seeking early screening, thus, having a direct impact on Thai immigrant women’s preventative health.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectcervical cancer screeningen_GB
dc.subjectKnowledge, Attitudes, Beliefsen_GB
dc.subjectCervical canceren_GB
dc.subjectThai immigrant womenen_GB
dc.subjectGermanyen_GB
dc.date.available2012-08-23T13:08:22Z-
dc.date.issued2012-08-23-
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-23T13:08:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.description.noteThe Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.en
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item.-
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