2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/240492
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Research Study
Title:
Migrant Middle School Media Nutrition Project
Author(s):
Kilanowski, Jill
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Zeta
Author Details:
Jill Kilanowski, PhD, APRN, CPNP; jill.kilanowski@gmail.com
Abstract:

Purpose: The purpose of the study was to teach middle school migrant farmworker children the benefits of healthy eating and activity using a multimedia, ethnic-tailored, and developmentally-appropriate health curriculum, imbedded in a 7-week summer Migrant Education Program (MEP).

Conceptual framework: Concepts from transcultural nursing, education and child development contributed to the study’s conceptual framework.

Design and Methods: This community-based single group pre and posttest intervention pilot study was conducted in a summer MEP and incorporated into its curricula and became part of the daily block schedule. Students learned about healthy eating and nutrition in classroom instruction by a certified science teacher. Video production was used to enhance learning of healthy choices, and retention of learned material taught by two media specialists with classroom experience. Both sessions were approximately one hour. The charge to middle school students was the creation of health infomercials from storyboard to video editing. Two chapters from Media-Smart Youth provided lesson material on the influence of media on consumer choices. Students needed to research healthy choices content using the Internet and classroom sources to ensure accuracy of the infomercial content. All media equipment was supplied. Outcomes assessed and measured by paired t-tests were body mass index (BMI), BMI percentile, muscle strength and flexibility, and We Can!™ and CATCH surveys were used to assess nutrition knowledge, behaviors and attitudes towards healthy choices.

Results: Sixty-four middle school students enrolled into the study (girls n = 31, boys n = 33). Ninety-five percent of students said they were Latino. The mean intervention days attended were 24 out of 34 days of the MEP program with 41% of students attending the MEP 30 days or more. Rates of overweight at the start of the program (n = 56) showed that 20% were overweight, 45% were obese with 6% having a BMI percentile of 99 or greater. At the conclusion of the healthy eating educational intervention, there was a non-significant decrease in the mean BMI, but a significant improvement towards healthy BMI percentile categories by Fisher’s Exact Test (p = 8.515-14). Student improvement in intervention knowledge attainment and healthy eating attitudes was significant by paired t-test in nine measures, and in three measurements by Wilcoxon signed-rank. Subgroup analysis results showed that there were significant gender differences in the eleven items of CATCH and Media-Smart Youth, and measures of assessments. While not a research question, 50% of students scored low or very low perceived food security.

Five student infomercials were produced and had titles of Smart Consumers, Exercising, My Plate, My Plate versus MyPyramid (in Spanish) and Diabetes and Prevention.

Conclusions: The limited time of the MEP saw significant changes in nutrition and activity knowledge, and in behaviors and attitudes. Trends towards healthier weight were also seen. Students learned new skills in the planning, design, conduct and editing of video infomercials utilizing camera equipment.

Clinical relevance: The school environment is effective for delivery of health promotion with this itinerant and vulnerable population, even with its short duration. Results from this pilot study will serve as a prototype for middle school health interventions.

Keywords:
Migrant; Latino; Education; Nutrition
Repository Posting Date:
29-Aug-2012
Date of Publication:
29-Aug-2012
Conference Date:
2012
Conference Name:
Poster Presentation, “Latino Middle School Migrant Students Learning Nutrition Through Video Production”
Conference Host:
36th Annual Conference, Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Dearborn, Michigan, USA
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Note:
The Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.; This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryAbstracten
dc.typeResearch Studyen
dc.titleMigrant Middle School Media Nutrition Projecten_US
dc.contributor.authorKilanowski, Jill-
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Zetaen
dc.author.detailsJill Kilanowski, PhD, APRN, CPNP; jill.kilanowski@gmail.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/240492-
dc.description.abstract<p>Purpose: The purpose of the study was to teach middle school migrant farmworker children the benefits of healthy eating and activity using a multimedia, ethnic-tailored, and developmentally-appropriate health curriculum, imbedded in a 7-week summer Migrant Education Program (MEP).</p> <p>Conceptual framework: Concepts from transcultural nursing, education and child development contributed to the study’s conceptual framework.</p> <p>Design and Methods: This community-based single group pre and posttest intervention pilot study was conducted in a summer MEP and incorporated into its curricula and became part of the daily block schedule. Students learned about healthy eating and nutrition in classroom instruction by a certified science teacher. Video production was used to enhance learning of healthy choices, and retention of learned material taught by two media specialists with classroom experience. Both sessions were approximately one hour. The charge to middle school students was the creation of health infomercials from storyboard to video editing. Two chapters from Media-Smart Youth provided lesson material on the influence of media on consumer choices. Students needed to research healthy choices content using the Internet and classroom sources to ensure accuracy of the infomercial content. All media equipment was supplied. Outcomes assessed and measured by paired <em>t</em>-tests were body mass index (BMI), BMI percentile, muscle strength and flexibility, and <em>We Can</em>!™ and CATCH surveys were used to assess nutrition knowledge, behaviors and attitudes towards healthy choices.</p> <p>Results: Sixty-four middle school students enrolled into the study (girls <em>n </em>= 31, boys <em>n </em>= 33). Ninety-five percent of students said they were Latino. The mean intervention days attended were 24 out of 34 days of the MEP program with 41% of students attending the MEP 30 days or more. Rates of overweight at the start of the program (<em>n</em> = 56) showed that 20% were overweight, 45% were obese with 6% having a BMI percentile of 99 or greater. At the conclusion of the healthy eating educational intervention, there was a non-significant decrease in the mean BMI, but a significant improvement towards healthy BMI percentile categories by Fisher’s Exact Test (<em>p</em> = 8.515<sup>-14</sup>). Student improvement in intervention knowledge attainment and healthy eating attitudes was significant by paired <em>t</em>-test in nine measures, and in three measurements by Wilcoxon signed-rank. Subgroup analysis results showed that there were significant gender differences in the eleven items of CATCH and Media-Smart Youth, and measures of assessments. While not a research question, 50% of students scored low or very low perceived food security.</p> <p>Five student infomercials were produced and had titles of Smart Consumers, Exercising, My Plate, My Plate versus MyPyramid (in Spanish) and Diabetes and Prevention.</p> <p>Conclusions:<strong> </strong>The limited time of the MEP<strong> </strong>saw significant changes in nutrition and activity knowledge, and in behaviors and attitudes. Trends towards healthier weight were also seen. Students learned new skills in the planning, design, conduct and editing of video infomercials utilizing camera equipment.</p> <p>Clinical relevance: The school environment is effective for delivery of health promotion with this itinerant and vulnerable population, even with its short duration. Results from this pilot study will serve as a prototype for middle school health interventions.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectMigranten_GB
dc.subjectLatinoen_GB
dc.subjectEducationen_GB
dc.subjectNutritionen_GB
dc.date.available2012-08-29T18:38:55Z-
dc.date.issued2012-08-29-
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-29T18:38:55Z-
dc.conference.date2012en
dc.conference.namePoster Presentation, “Latino Middle School Migrant Students Learning Nutrition Through Video Production”en_GB
dc.conference.host36th Annual Conference, Midwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
dc.conference.locationDearborn, Michigan, USAen_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.description.noteThe Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.en
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.