2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/243147
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Interpreting the Changed Me in the Mirror: Viewing Self after a Mastectomy
Author(s):
Freysteinson, Wyona M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Beta (Houston)
Author Details:
Freysteinson, Wyona M., PhD, MN
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of the study leading to this comparison between interpreting a mirror image and interpreting a text was to study the experience of viewing themselves in the mirror for women who have had a mastectomy. Methods: A purposeful sample of 12 women shared their stories of viewing themselves in the mirror 3-12 months post-mastectomy in tape recorded semi-structured interviews. The data was transcribed and analyzed using Ricoeur's hermeneutic phenomenology and methodology. A native reading, a structural analysis and a phenomenological interpretation uncovered a description of viewing self in the mirror. Results: The women's stories suggested there were four key moments in the experience of viewing self in the mirror: I am, I decide, I see, and I consent. These moments align closely with the major tenants of Ricoeur's philosophy of the will: decision, action, and consent. The participant's words suggested one sees in the mirror in three different ways: with the eyes, the mind's eye and one sees/interprets one's own meaning. The concepts of explanation, understanding, distanciation and appropriation were aspects of seeing/interpreting the meaning of what is seen in the mirror. These concepts are also key concepts in Ricoeur's philosophy of interpreting a text. Conclusion: This study acts as a paradigm case in which Ricoeur's philosophy of textual interpretation extended to the human condition. Globally, knowledge of this experience may be of interest to nurses who work with patients where a mirror is required to view recent bodily trauma and/or surgery. Sensitive nursing mirror interventions are considered including pre and post-operative dialogue and education; and empowering women with the knowledge that it is alright to view self in the mirror alone, or with the support of a nurse, physician and/or loved one. Nursing practice, education and research needs concerning the use of the mirror are explored.
Keywords:
Mirror; Mastectomy; Hermeneutic Phenomenology
Repository Posting Date:
12-Sep-2012
Date of Publication:
12-Sep-2012
Conference Date:
2012
Conference Name:
23rd International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Brisbane, Australia
Note:
Items submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleInterpreting the Changed Me in the Mirror: Viewing Self after a Mastectomyen
dc.contributor.authorFreysteinson, Wyona M.en
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Beta (Houston)en
dc.author.detailsFreysteinson, Wyona M., PhD, MNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/243147-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of the study leading to this comparison between interpreting a mirror image and interpreting a text was to study the experience of viewing themselves in the mirror for women who have had a mastectomy. Methods: A purposeful sample of 12 women shared their stories of viewing themselves in the mirror 3-12 months post-mastectomy in tape recorded semi-structured interviews. The data was transcribed and analyzed using Ricoeur's hermeneutic phenomenology and methodology. A native reading, a structural analysis and a phenomenological interpretation uncovered a description of viewing self in the mirror. Results: The women's stories suggested there were four key moments in the experience of viewing self in the mirror: I am, I decide, I see, and I consent. These moments align closely with the major tenants of Ricoeur's philosophy of the will: decision, action, and consent. The participant's words suggested one sees in the mirror in three different ways: with the eyes, the mind's eye and one sees/interprets one's own meaning. The concepts of explanation, understanding, distanciation and appropriation were aspects of seeing/interpreting the meaning of what is seen in the mirror. These concepts are also key concepts in Ricoeur's philosophy of interpreting a text. Conclusion: This study acts as a paradigm case in which Ricoeur's philosophy of textual interpretation extended to the human condition. Globally, knowledge of this experience may be of interest to nurses who work with patients where a mirror is required to view recent bodily trauma and/or surgery. Sensitive nursing mirror interventions are considered including pre and post-operative dialogue and education; and empowering women with the knowledge that it is alright to view self in the mirror alone, or with the support of a nurse, physician and/or loved one. Nursing practice, education and research needs concerning the use of the mirror are explored.en
dc.subjectMirroren
dc.subjectMastectomyen
dc.subjectHermeneutic Phenomenologyen
dc.date.available2012-09-12T09:18:24Z-
dc.date.issued2012-9-12-
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-12T09:18:24Z-
dc.conference.date2012en
dc.conference.name23rd International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationBrisbane, Australiaen
dc.description.noteItems submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.-
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