2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/243217
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Defining Research in DNP Programs: Lessons Learned
Author(s):
Samson, Linda F.; Connolly, Maria A.; MacMullen, Nancy J.; Martinm Patricia
Author Details:
Samson, Linda F., PhD, RN, BC, NEA, BC, lsamson@govst.edu; Connolly, Maria A., PhD, FCCM, CNE, ANEF; MacMullen, Nancy J., PhD, RN; Martinm Patricia, DNP, RN;
Abstract:
Over the past five years the Doctor of Nursing Practice has emerged as the terminal degree for clinical nursing practice. Since the 2006 publication of the AACN Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice, the number of programs offering the DNP degree has grown from 20 in 2006 to over 200 in 2011. The number of DNP programs in the US now exceeds the number of PhD programs. While this trend is not yet an international one, interest is occurring. Although there has been a great deal of discussion about what a terminal practice degree is and how it should differ from a research degree the issue of research preparation for advanced practitioners continues to present challenges because many of the DNP programs have emerged in schools with limited scholarship or research to support doctoral research degrees. This session will address two schools' efforts to build a cadre of advanced practice nurses with the capacity to engage in development of evidence-based practice and conduct translational and community-based participatory research. Both of these schools started from a common curriculum plan and have moved in slightly different directions with program implementation. However each has now conferred degrees and has learned lessons about student recruitment, foundational knowledge, and the similarities and differences between capstone projects and the traditional dissertation. Both programs build the solid foundation that supports future research efforts but do not require students to conduct original research for the degree. The clear goal remains preparing the expert practitioner and resisting the temptation to be seen as characterized in one USA educational publication as the "PhD Light". 
Keywords:
Collaboration; Innovation in education; Translational research
Repository Posting Date:
12-Sep-2012
Date of Publication:
12-Sep-2012
Conference Date:
2012
Conference Name:
23rd International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Brisbane, Australia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDefining Research in DNP Programs: Lessons Learneden_GB
dc.contributor.authorSamson, Linda F.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorConnolly, Maria A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMacMullen, Nancy J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMartinm Patriciaen_GB
dc.author.detailsSamson, Linda F., PhD, RN, BC, NEA, BC, lsamson@govst.edu; Connolly, Maria A., PhD, FCCM, CNE, ANEF; MacMullen, Nancy J., PhD, RN; Martinm Patricia, DNP, RN;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/243217-
dc.description.abstractOver the past five years the Doctor of Nursing Practice has emerged as the terminal degree for clinical nursing practice. Since the 2006 publication of the AACN Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice, the number of programs offering the DNP degree has grown from 20 in 2006 to over 200 in 2011. The number of DNP programs in the US now exceeds the number of PhD programs. While this trend is not yet an international one, interest is occurring. Although there has been a great deal of discussion about what a terminal practice degree is and how it should differ from a research degree the issue of research preparation for advanced practitioners continues to present challenges because many of the DNP programs have emerged in schools with limited scholarship or research to support doctoral research degrees. This session will address two schools' efforts to build a cadre of advanced practice nurses with the capacity to engage in development of evidence-based practice and conduct translational and community-based participatory research. Both of these schools started from a common curriculum plan and have moved in slightly different directions with program implementation. However each has now conferred degrees and has learned lessons about student recruitment, foundational knowledge, and the similarities and differences between capstone projects and the traditional dissertation. Both programs build the solid foundation that supports future research efforts but do not require students to conduct original research for the degree. The clear goal remains preparing the expert practitioner and resisting the temptation to be seen as characterized in one USA educational publication as the "PhD Light". en_GB
dc.subjectCollaborationen_GB
dc.subjectInnovation in educationen_GB
dc.subjectTranslational researchen_GB
dc.date.available2012-09-12T09:19:10Z-
dc.date.issued2012-09-12-
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-12T09:19:10Z-
dc.conference.date2012en_GB
dc.conference.name23rd International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationBrisbane, Australiaen_GB
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