A Correlational Study of Family Stress and Adaptation Among the Surviving Parents of the New York City Firefighters Who Perished in the World Trade Center Disaster

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/243252
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Correlational Study of Family Stress and Adaptation Among the Surviving Parents of the New York City Firefighters Who Perished in the World Trade Center Disaster
Author(s):
McGibbon, Mary Frances; Lotas, Marilyn "Lynn" J.
Author Details:
McGibbon, Mary Frances, DNP, RN, MSN, FNP-BC, RNFA, McGibbon221@Hotmail.com; Lotas, Marilyn "Lynn" J., RN, PhD;
Abstract:
Purpose:

The parents of the Firefighters who perished in the World Trade Center Disaster have spent years dealing with the impact this stressful life event has had on themselves and on their families.  This study had three purposes:  to examine the perceived level of stress experienced by the parents of the firefighters who died in the World Trade Center Disaster (WTCD); to examine the prevalence of stress related health problems; and to examine the relationship between the perceived level of stress and stress-related health problems experienced by these parents.

Methods:

Perceived levels of family stress were measured with the Family Inventory of Life and Changes (FILE, 1991), stress related health problems were measured using the Center for Disease Control and Prevention Health Related Quality of Life-14 (CDC HRQOL-14) survey tool, and the Demographic Information Data Sheet (DIDS) provided self-identifiable demographic information.   The results of these tools were correlated to examine relationships between the proposed variables.  

Results:  

The majority of participants identified with a moderate level of stress.  An overwhelmingly number of participants rated their general health as good. The participants between the ages of 66-75 years of age had significant difference in the amount of poor mental health days out of the previous 30.  Furthermore, when the days the participants self-identified as not getting enough sleep from the CDC HRQOL-14 was correlated to the total sum score on the FILE the results revealed another significant difference.  Female participants in the sample group overwhelmingly identified higher stress scores on the FILE, more unhealthy days and more health related problems and impairments.

 Conclusions:

The findings that the trauma of WTCD, and the loss of a family member in the attack, seems to continue to impact the lives of this group ten years after the WTCD, and in many cases remains as acute today as it was then.

Keywords:
Stress; 11-Sep; Survivors
Repository Posting Date:
12-Sep-2012
Date of Publication:
12-Sep-2012
Conference Date:
2012
Conference Name:
23rd International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Brisbane, Australia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Correlational Study of Family Stress and Adaptation Among the Surviving Parents of the New York City Firefighters Who Perished in the World Trade Center Disasteren_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcGibbon, Mary Francesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLotas, Marilyn "Lynn" J.en_GB
dc.author.detailsMcGibbon, Mary Frances, DNP, RN, MSN, FNP-BC, RNFA, McGibbon221@Hotmail.com; Lotas, Marilyn "Lynn" J., RN, PhD;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/243252-
dc.description.abstract<b>Purpose: </b> <p>The parents of the Firefighters who perished in the World Trade Center Disaster have spent years dealing with the impact this stressful life event has had on themselves and on their families.&nbsp;&nbsp;This study had three purposes:&nbsp; to examine the perceived level of stress experienced by the parents of the firefighters who died in the World Trade Center Disaster (WTCD); to examine the prevalence of stress related health problems; and to examine the relationship between the perceived level of stress and stress-related health problems experienced by these parents. <p><b>Methods: </b> <p>Perceived levels of family stress were measured with the Family Inventory of Life and Changes (FILE, 1991), stress related health problems were measured using the Center for Disease Control and Prevention Health Related Quality of Life-14 (CDC HRQOL-14) survey tool, and the Demographic Information Data Sheet (DIDS) provided self-identifiable demographic information.&nbsp;&nbsp; The results of these tools were correlated to examine relationships between the proposed variables.&nbsp;&nbsp; <p><b>Results: </b> &nbsp; <p>The majority of participants identified with a moderate level of stress.&nbsp; An overwhelmingly number of participants rated their general health as good. The participants between the ages of 66-75 years of age had significant difference in the amount of poor mental health days out of the previous 30.&nbsp; Furthermore, when the days the participants self-identified as not getting enough sleep from the CDC HRQOL-14 was correlated to the total sum score on the FILE the results revealed another significant difference.&nbsp; Female participants in the sample group overwhelmingly identified higher stress scores on the FILE, more unhealthy days and more health related problems and impairments. <p>&nbsp;<b>Conclusions: </b> <p>The findings that the trauma of WTCD, and the loss of a family member in the attack, seems to continue to impact the lives of this group ten years after the WTCD, and in many cases remains as acute today as it was then.en_GB
dc.subjectStressen_GB
dc.subject11-Sepen_GB
dc.subjectSurvivorsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-09-12T09:19:38Z-
dc.date.issued2012-09-12-
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-12T09:19:38Z-
dc.conference.date2012en_GB
dc.conference.name23rd International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationBrisbane, Australiaen_GB
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