2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/243276
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Systematic Literature Review of Pediatric Pain Measures
Author(s):
Yang, Pei-Hsin; Chao, Kuo-Li
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Yang, Pei-Hsin, RN, BSN; Chao, Kuo-Li, RN, BSN
Abstract:
Abstract: Articles on pediatric behavioral scales were reviewed to elucidate usage of pain assessment tools in clinical practice. Methods: A literature search was performed in the MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, SODL, CEPS and master thesis databases for systematic reviews published from 2000 to 2011 using the following search terms: pain, child, children, childhood, systematic review, and instrument. A total of 112 articles were identified. 7 articles on child pain assessment instrument met the inclusion criteria. Results: Pediatric pain assessment scales can be either observational scales or self-reported measure. 20 articles on observational scales were identified. CHEOPS, FLACC, PPPM, COMFORT, POCIS scales were suggested to be used in hospitalized, post-operative, critical care, and burn patients. A total of 34 single-item self-report measures were found. The most often used scale for research purposes were Pieces of hurt tool, FPS, Oucher, Wong-Baker FACES pain score, and VAS. The scales mentioned above were reliable, effective, and can be utilized in different types of diseases. Conclusion: Pain is subjective. In order to accurately assess pain in pediatric population, behavioral scales, self-report measure, and physiologic indicators should be incorporated. In pediatric population pain could not be well expressed due to immature cognition. Self-report measure is not a reliable tool when used in patients less than 6-year-old. Pain will be assessed more accurately when self-report measure is utilized in combination with a reliable and effective behavioral observation scale. In the future, research should be directed to comparison of the physiologic indicators with observational scales vs self-report measure to validate the effectiveness of different scales.
Keywords:
Pain; Children; Instrument
Repository Posting Date:
12-Sep-2012
Date of Publication:
12-Sep-2012
Conference Date:
2012
Conference Name:
23rd International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Brisbane, Australia
Note:
Items submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleSystematic Literature Review of Pediatric Pain Measuresen
dc.contributor.authorYang, Pei-Hsinen
dc.contributor.authorChao, Kuo-Lien
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsYang, Pei-Hsin, RN, BSN; Chao, Kuo-Li, RN, BSNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/243276-
dc.description.abstractAbstract: Articles on pediatric behavioral scales were reviewed to elucidate usage of pain assessment tools in clinical practice. Methods: A literature search was performed in the MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, SODL, CEPS and master thesis databases for systematic reviews published from 2000 to 2011 using the following search terms: pain, child, children, childhood, systematic review, and instrument. A total of 112 articles were identified. 7 articles on child pain assessment instrument met the inclusion criteria. Results: Pediatric pain assessment scales can be either observational scales or self-reported measure. 20 articles on observational scales were identified. CHEOPS, FLACC, PPPM, COMFORT, POCIS scales were suggested to be used in hospitalized, post-operative, critical care, and burn patients. A total of 34 single-item self-report measures were found. The most often used scale for research purposes were Pieces of hurt tool, FPS, Oucher, Wong-Baker FACES pain score, and VAS. The scales mentioned above were reliable, effective, and can be utilized in different types of diseases. Conclusion: Pain is subjective. In order to accurately assess pain in pediatric population, behavioral scales, self-report measure, and physiologic indicators should be incorporated. In pediatric population pain could not be well expressed due to immature cognition. Self-report measure is not a reliable tool when used in patients less than 6-year-old. Pain will be assessed more accurately when self-report measure is utilized in combination with a reliable and effective behavioral observation scale. In the future, research should be directed to comparison of the physiologic indicators with observational scales vs self-report measure to validate the effectiveness of different scales.en
dc.subjectPainen
dc.subjectChildrenen
dc.subjectInstrumenten
dc.date.available2012-09-12T09:19:59Z-
dc.date.issued2012-9-12-
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-12T09:19:59Z-
dc.conference.date2012en
dc.conference.name23rd International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationBrisbane, Australiaen
dc.description.noteItems submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.