2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/243276
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Systematic Literature Review of Pediatric Pain Measures
Author(s):
Yang, Pei-Hsin; Chao, Kuo-Li
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
N/A
Author Details:
Yang, Pei-Hsin, RN, BSN, a8810331@yahoo.com.tw; Chao, Kuo-Li, RN, BSN;
Abstract:
Abstract: 

Articles on pediatric behavioral scales were reviewed to elucidate usage of pain assessment tools in clinical practice. 

Methods: 

A literature search was performed in the MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, SODL, CEPS and master thesis databases for systematic reviews published from 2000 to 2011 using the following search terms: pain, child, children, childhood, systematic review, and instrument.  A total of 112 articles were identified.  7 articles on child pain assessment instrument met the inclusion criteria.

Results:

Pediatric pain assessment scales can be either observational scales or self-reported measure.  20 articles on observational scales were identified.  CHEOPS, FLACC, PPPM, COMFORT, POCIS scales were suggested to be used in hospitalized, post-operative, critical care, and burn patients.  A total of 34 single-item self-report measures were found.  The most often used scale for research purposes were Pieces of hurt tool, FPS, Oucher, Wong-Baker FACES pain score, and VAS.  The scales mentioned above were reliable, effective, and can be utilized in different types of diseases. 

Conclusion:

Pain is subjective.  In order to accurately assess pain in pediatric population, behavioral scales, self-report measure, and physiologic indicators should be incorporated.  In pediatric population pain could not be well expressed due to immature cognition.  Self-report measure is not a reliable tool when used in patients less than 6-year-old.  Pain will be assessed more accurately when self-report measure is utilized in combination with a reliable and effective behavioral observation scale.   In the future, research should be directed to comparison of the physiologic indicators with observational scales vs self-report measure to validate the effectiveness of different scales.

Keywords:
Pain; Children; Instrument
Repository Posting Date:
12-Sep-2012
Date of Publication:
12-Sep-2012 ; 12-Sep-2012
Conference Date:
2012
Conference Name:
23rd International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Brisbane, Australia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleSystematic Literature Review of Pediatric Pain Measuresen
dc.contributor.authorYang, Pei-Hsinen
dc.contributor.authorChao, Kuo-Lien
dc.contributor.departmentN/Aen
dc.author.detailsYang, Pei-Hsin, RN, BSN, a8810331@yahoo.com.tw; Chao, Kuo-Li, RN, BSN;en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/243276-
dc.description.abstractAbstract:&nbsp; <p>Articles on pediatric behavioral scales were reviewed to elucidate usage of pain assessment tools in clinical practice.&nbsp; <p>Methods:&nbsp; <p>A literature search was performed in the MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, SODL, CEPS and master thesis databases for systematic reviews published from 2000 to 2011 using the following search terms: pain, child, children, childhood, systematic review, and instrument.&nbsp; A total of 112 articles were identified.&nbsp; 7 articles on child pain assessment instrument met the inclusion criteria. <p>Results: <p>Pediatric pain assessment scales can be either observational scales or self-reported measure.&nbsp; 20 articles on observational scales were identified.&nbsp; CHEOPS, FLACC, PPPM, COMFORT, POCIS scales were suggested to be used in hospitalized, post-operative, critical care, and burn patients.&nbsp; A total of 34 single-item self-report measures were found.&nbsp; The most often used scale for research purposes were Pieces of hurt tool, FPS, Oucher, Wong-Baker FACES pain score, and VAS.&nbsp; The scales mentioned above were reliable, effective, and can be utilized in different types of diseases.&nbsp; <p>Conclusion: <p>Pain is subjective.&nbsp; In order to accurately assess pain in pediatric population, behavioral scales, self-report measure, and physiologic indicators should be incorporated.&nbsp; In pediatric population pain could not be well expressed due to immature cognition.&nbsp; Self-report measure is not a reliable tool when used in patients less than 6-year-old.&nbsp; Pain will be assessed more accurately when self-report measure is utilized in combination with a reliable and effective behavioral observation scale.&nbsp; &nbsp;In the future, research should be directed to comparison of the physiologic indicators with observational scales vs self-report measure to validate the effectiveness of different scales.en
dc.subjectPainen
dc.subjectChildrenen
dc.subjectInstrumenten
dc.date.available2012-09-12T09:19:59Z-
dc.date.issued2012-09-12-
dc.date.issued2012-09-12en
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-12T09:19:59Z-
dc.conference.date2012en
dc.conference.name23rd International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationBrisbane, Australiaen
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