Educational Effects on Repeating Use of and Evaluation by Human Patient Simulators for Developing Lung Sound Auscultation Skills

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/243278
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Educational Effects on Repeating Use of and Evaluation by Human Patient Simulators for Developing Lung Sound Auscultation Skills
Author(s):
Yamauchi, Toyoaki
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Zeta Omega-at-Large
Author Details:
Yamauchi, Toyoaki, MD, ND, PhD, FNP, RN, yamauchi@nagoya-u.jp;
Abstract:
Purpose: A purpose of this study was to clarify effects of utilizing human patient simulators for development of auscultation skill on lung sounds.

Methods: For the nurses who participated the three times consecutive series of workshops about physical assessment, evaluation examinations on auscultation skills for lung sound by using human patient simulators had been repeated six times as follows: the first (initial pre-workshop), the second (at the initial post-workshop), the third (the second pre-workshop), the fourth (at the second post-workshop), the fifth (the third pre-workshop) and the sixth (at the third post-workshop). Total numbers of nurses who participated all six sessions were 25.

Results: Wheezes, rhonchi, fine crackles, normal breath sound, bronchial breath sound, and absent of right lung sound were shown the correct answer rates better by repeating lectures / practice / tests for auscultation skills on lung sounds. Regarding to rhonchi, wheezes and fine crackles, the more times repeating evaluation examination on auscultation skill, the better outcomes were. Identifying locations of those abnormal lung sounds was shown difficult. It appeared that coarse crackles had been difficult to distinguish with other lung sounds. Regarding to pleural friction rub, a repeating evaluation examination on auscultation skills did not improve the correct answer rate.

 Conclusion: Human patient simulators are effective and powerful to develop physical assessment skills.

Keywords:
human patient simulators; physical assessment; educational application
Repository Posting Date:
12-Sep-2012
Date of Publication:
12-Sep-2012 ; 12-Sep-2012
Conference Date:
2012
Conference Name:
23rd International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Brisbane, Australia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleEducational Effects on Repeating Use of and Evaluation by Human Patient Simulators for Developing Lung Sound Auscultation Skillsen
dc.contributor.authorYamauchi, Toyoakien
dc.contributor.departmentZeta Omega-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsYamauchi, Toyoaki, MD, ND, PhD, FNP, RN, yamauchi@nagoya-u.jp;en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/243278-
dc.description.abstract<b><b>Purpose: </b></b>A purpose of this study was to clarify effects of utilizing human patient simulators for development of auscultation skill on lung sounds. <p align="left"><b><b>Methods: </b></b>For the nurses who participated the three times consecutive series of workshops about physical assessment, evaluation examinations on auscultation skills for lung sound by using human patient simulators had been repeated six times as follows: the first (initial pre-workshop), the second (at the initial post-workshop), the third (the second pre-workshop), the fourth (at the second post-workshop), the fifth (the third pre-workshop) and the sixth (at the third post-workshop). Total numbers of nurses who participated all six sessions were 25. <p align="left"><b><b>Results: </b></b>Wheezes, rhonchi, fine crackles, normal breath sound, bronchial breath sound, and absent of right lung sound were shown the correct answer rates better by repeating lectures / practice / tests for auscultation skills on lung sounds. Regarding to rhonchi, wheezes and fine crackles, the more times repeating evaluation examination on auscultation skill, the better outcomes were. Identifying locations of those abnormal lung sounds was shown difficult. It appeared that coarse crackles had been difficult to distinguish with other lung sounds. Regarding to pleural friction rub, a repeating evaluation examination on auscultation skills did not improve the correct answer rate. <p align="left"><b>&nbsp;<b>Conclusion: </b> </b>Human patient simulators are effective and powerful to develop physical assessment skills.en
dc.subjecthuman patient simulatorsen
dc.subjectphysical assessmenten
dc.subjecteducational applicationen
dc.date.available2012-09-12T09:20:01Z-
dc.date.issued2012-09-12-
dc.date.issued2012-09-12en
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-12T09:20:01Z-
dc.conference.date2012en
dc.conference.name23rd International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationBrisbane, Australiaen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.