A Parent-Directed Portion Education Intervention for Young Children: Be Beary Healthy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/243303
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Parent-Directed Portion Education Intervention for Young Children: Be Beary Healthy
Author(s):
Small, Leigh; Gannon, Alex; Thompson, Sharon; Bonds-McClain, Darya; Vaughan, Linda
Author Details:
Small, Leigh, PhD, RN, PNP-PC, FNAP, Leigh.Small@asu.edu; Gannon, Alex, BS; Thompson, Sharon, BS; Bonds-McClain, Darya, PhD; Vaughan, Linda, PhD, RD;
Abstract:
Purpose: Despite evidence that increased portion sizes may contribute to overweight/obesity in young children, guidelines for feeding preschool children remain unclear and difficult to relate to parents.

Methods:  The purpose of this single-group pilot study, which used a pre-/post-test design, was to determine the preliminary effects of a parent-focused, skill-building intervention on parents’ knowledge of healthy nutrition for preschoolers, parents’ skill of providing age-appropriate food portions to their child, and the child’s dietary intake. The intervention provided to parents consisted of audiotaped and written information, and suggested activities using a special plate designed to facilitate appropriate provision of food portions for preschool children. The 45 participant parents were mothers, 23-53 years old (M = 34.6 years, SD = 6.4); their children were 4-6 years (M = 4.5 years, SD = 0.6). After completing formal consenting and pre-testing, parents were provided child nutrition information, skill-building recommendations, and portion-related activities. 

Results: Paired samples t tests were conducted to examine the difference between macronutrients mothers served and children consumed at pre- and post-testing.  The average total daily calories mothers served significantly decreased (t = 3.92, p = .00), as did the average total daily calories the children ate (t = 3.35, p = .00) and the average amounts of fat/saturated fat, protein, and carbohydrates pre- to post-test.  Effect sizes for each macronutrient ranged from .10 to .60, with medium effects for the total daily calories and carbohydrates served and consumed. No significant difference was found between pre- (M = 14.8) and post-test (M = 15.3) scores for parents’ knowledge of healthy nutrition (t = -1.12, p = .26).

Conclusion: Results suggest that outcomes were most likely related to parents reducing the portions served rather than an increase in parents’ nutrition knowledge.  Preliminary findings warrant a full-scale, randomized control investigation.

Keywords:
Preschool child; Parent; Portion Education
Repository Posting Date:
12-Sep-2012
Date of Publication:
12-Sep-2012
Conference Date:
2012
Conference Name:
23rd International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Brisbane, Australia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Parent-Directed Portion Education Intervention for Young Children: Be Beary Healthyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmall, Leighen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGannon, Alexen_GB
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Sharonen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBonds-McClain, Daryaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVaughan, Lindaen_GB
dc.author.detailsSmall, Leigh, PhD, RN, PNP-PC, FNAP, Leigh.Small@asu.edu; Gannon, Alex, BS; Thompson, Sharon, BS; Bonds-McClain, Darya, PhD; Vaughan, Linda, PhD, RD;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/243303-
dc.description.abstract<b>Purpose: </b>Despite evidence that increased portion sizes may contribute to overweight/obesity in young children, guidelines for feeding preschool children remain unclear and difficult to relate to parents. <div></div><p><b>Methods: </b>&nbsp;The purpose of this single-group pilot study, which used a pre-/post-test design, was to determine the preliminary effects of a parent-focused, skill-building intervention on parents&rsquo; knowledge of healthy nutrition for preschoolers, parents&rsquo; skill of providing age-appropriate food portions to their child, and the child&rsquo;s dietary intake. The intervention provided to parents consisted of audiotaped and written information, and suggested activities using a special plate designed to facilitate appropriate provision of food portions for preschool children. The<b> </b>45 participant parents were mothers, 23-53 years old (<i>M</i> = 34.6 years, <i>SD =</i> 6.4); their children were 4-6 years (<i>M</i> = 4.5 years, <i>SD =</i> 0.6). After completing formal consenting and pre-testing, parents were provided child nutrition information, skill-building recommendations, and portion-related activities.&nbsp; <p><b>Results: </b>Paired samples <i>t</i> tests were conducted to examine the difference between macronutrients mothers served and children consumed at pre- and post-testing.&nbsp; The average total daily calories mothers served significantly decreased (<i>t</i> = 3.92, <i>p</i> = .00), as did the average total daily calories the children ate (<i>t</i> = 3.35, <i>p</i> = .00) and the average amounts of fat/saturated fat, protein, and carbohydrates pre- to post-test.&nbsp; Effect sizes for each macronutrient ranged from .10 to .60, with medium effects for the total daily calories and carbohydrates served and consumed. No significant difference was found between pre- (<i>M</i> = 14.8) and post-test (<i>M</i> = 15.3) scores for parents&rsquo; knowledge of healthy nutrition (<i>t</i> = -1.12, <i>p</i> = .26). <p><b>Conclusion: </b>Results suggest that outcomes were most likely related to parents reducing the portions served rather than an increase in parents&rsquo; nutrition knowledge.&nbsp; Preliminary findings warrant a full-scale, randomized control investigation.en_GB
dc.subjectPreschool childen_GB
dc.subjectParenten_GB
dc.subjectPortion Educationen_GB
dc.date.available2012-09-12T09:20:21Z-
dc.date.issued2012-09-12-
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-12T09:20:21Z-
dc.conference.date2012en_GB
dc.conference.name23rd International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationBrisbane, Australiaen_GB
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