Risk Assessment of Indonesian Satellite Health Clinics Caring for Displaced Survivors Two Years After the December 2005 Tsunami

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/243316
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Risk Assessment of Indonesian Satellite Health Clinics Caring for Displaced Survivors Two Years After the December 2005 Tsunami
Author(s):
Manning, Mary Lou
Author Details:
Manning, Mary Lou, PhD, CRNP, CIC, marylouman@gmail.com;
Abstract:
In December 2005 a massive earthquake struck off the western coast of Sumatra, Indonesia triggering an explosive tsunami. More than 175,000 died and over 1.7 million people were displaced and relocated to temporary homes, shelters or camps.  Many villages were completely destroyed and the community infrastructure, including health care services, was decimated. Disaster relief funds supported the construction of small prototype satellite health clinics to care for those displaced. In 2007 significant numbers of people remained in “temporary” shelters and the clinics continued to provide their health care. Consequently, a team of American and Indonesian nurses and physicians were invited to conducted surveys in the clinics in Aceh Baret and Nagan Raya districts to determine quality of care, make recommendations and conduct education. A clinic assessment tool was developed and piloted prior to use. The survey included on-site observations, record reviews, and staff interviews. In addition a targeted infection control risk assessment focused on hand hygiene, availability of running water, patient screening and triage, sharps safety, medical waste, occupational exposure, environmental cleanliness, disinfection and infectious disease transmission including avian influenza. Several areas for immediate improvement emerged and action taken. In the ensuring years we continued to assist the health clinics. Disaster relief is a complex process measured not in months but years. Rebuilding the health care system to care for people who have experienced catastrophic loss of life and property is a slow, deliberate process requiring extensive resources. It was shown that small improvements could help improve the quality of care. Lessons learned from previous disasters must be applied to disaster planning and management at the local, regional, national and global levels. It is imperative that we learn together how to best serve our global community in both the short term and the long term following disasters of any magnitude.
Keywords:
disaster relief; health care clinics; quality care
Repository Posting Date:
12-Sep-2012
Date of Publication:
12-Sep-2012
Conference Date:
2012
Conference Name:
23rd International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Brisbane, Australia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRisk Assessment of Indonesian Satellite Health Clinics Caring for Displaced Survivors Two Years After the December 2005 Tsunamien_GB
dc.contributor.authorManning, Mary Louen_GB
dc.author.detailsManning, Mary Lou, PhD, CRNP, CIC, marylouman@gmail.com;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/243316-
dc.description.abstractIn December 2005 a massive earthquake struck off the western coast of Sumatra, Indonesia triggering an explosive tsunami. More than 175,000 died and over 1.7 million people were displaced and relocated to temporary homes, shelters or camps.  Many villages were completely destroyed and the community infrastructure, including health care services, was decimated. Disaster relief funds supported the construction of small prototype satellite health clinics to care for those displaced. In 2007 significant numbers of people remained in “temporary” shelters and the clinics continued to provide their health care. Consequently, a team of American and Indonesian nurses and physicians were invited to conducted surveys in the clinics in Aceh Baret and Nagan Raya districts to determine quality of care, make recommendations and conduct education. A clinic assessment tool was developed and piloted prior to use. The survey included on-site observations, record reviews, and staff interviews. In addition a targeted infection control risk assessment focused on hand hygiene, availability of running water, patient screening and triage, sharps safety, medical waste, occupational exposure, environmental cleanliness, disinfection and infectious disease transmission including avian influenza. Several areas for immediate improvement emerged and action taken. In the ensuring years we continued to assist the health clinics. Disaster relief is a complex process measured not in months but years. Rebuilding the health care system to care for people who have experienced catastrophic loss of life and property is a slow, deliberate process requiring extensive resources. It was shown that small improvements could help improve the quality of care. Lessons learned from previous disasters must be applied to disaster planning and management at the local, regional, national and global levels. It is imperative that we learn together how to best serve our global community in both the short term and the long term following disasters of any magnitude.en_GB
dc.subjectdisaster reliefen_GB
dc.subjecthealth care clinicsen_GB
dc.subjectquality careen_GB
dc.date.available2012-09-12T09:20:32Z-
dc.date.issued2012-09-12-
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-12T09:20:32Z-
dc.conference.date2012en_GB
dc.conference.name23rd International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationBrisbane, Australiaen_GB
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