Factors Associated with Life Quality in Persons with Suicide Attempts: A Cross-Sectional Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/243363
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Associated with Life Quality in Persons with Suicide Attempts: A Cross-Sectional Study
Author(s):
Tzeng, Wen-Chii; Wang, Shu-May
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Beta-at-Large Chapter
Author Details:
Tzeng, Wen-Chii, PhD, wctzeng@mail.ndmctsgh.edu.tw; Wang, Shu-May, MS;
Abstract:
Purpose: Most studies focus on what life might have been like before a completed suicide, however, do not describe quality of life in individuals after their suicide attempts. Yet, life dissatisfaction results in the risk of suicide in the long term. This paper is a report of a study of the factors that associated with quality of life among suicidal individuals in Taiwan.

Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted to recruit suicidal individuals receiving care from one suicide prevention centre in northern Taiwan between April 2008 and March 2009. Data were collected on depression and quality of life using the Beck Depression Inventory Taiwan version and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument-BREF Taiwan version. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, t-test, one-way ANOVA, Pearson’s correlations, and Generalized Linear Models.

Results: One hundred and three suicidal individuals completed the study. The majority of them (47%) had severe depression, and all mean scores in four domains of the quality-of-life measure were significantly lower than those of general population in Taiwan. The associations between scores on the depression and life quality scales were statistically significantly inversely correlated. In addition, severity of depression, reattempting suicide during follow-up care, educational level and age were four most influencing variables to the quality of life.

Conclusion: Suicidal individuals experienced a worse QOL than patients with major depression. Both the severity of depression and poor life quality are more likely to make further attempts. Therefore, mental health professionals have to integrate these findings in follow-up suicidal care.

Keywords:
depression; quality of life; suicide, attempted
Repository Posting Date:
12-Sep-2012
Date of Publication:
12-Sep-2012 ; 12-Sep-2012
Conference Date:
2012
Conference Name:
23rd International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Brisbane, Australia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleFactors Associated with Life Quality in Persons with Suicide Attempts: A Cross-Sectional Studyen
dc.contributor.authorTzeng, Wen-Chiien
dc.contributor.authorWang, Shu-Mayen
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Beta-at-Large Chapteren
dc.author.detailsTzeng, Wen-Chii, PhD, wctzeng@mail.ndmctsgh.edu.tw; Wang, Shu-May, MS;en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/243363-
dc.description.abstract<b>Purpose: </b>Most studies focus on what life might have been like before a completed suicide, however, do not describe quality of life in individuals after their suicide attempts. Yet, life dissatisfaction results in the risk of suicide in the long term. This paper is a report of a study of the factors that associated with quality of life among suicidal individuals in Taiwan. <p><b>Methods: </b>A cross-sectional survey was conducted to recruit suicidal individuals receiving care from one suicide prevention centre in northern Taiwan between April 2008 and March 2009. Data were collected on depression and quality of life using the Beck Depression Inventory Taiwan version and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument-BREF Taiwan version. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, <i>t</i>-test, one-way ANOVA, Pearson&rsquo;s correlations, and Generalized Linear Models. <p><b>Results: </b>One hundred and three suicidal individuals completed the study. The majority of them (47%) had severe depression, and all mean scores in four domains of the quality-of-life measure were significantly lower than those of general population in Taiwan. The associations between scores on the depression and life quality scales were statistically significantly inversely correlated. In addition, severity of depression, reattempting suicide during follow-up care, educational level and age were four most influencing variables to the quality of life. <p><b>Conclusion: </b>Suicidal individuals experienced a worse QOL than patients with major depression. Both the severity of depression and poor life quality are more likely to make further attempts. Therefore, mental health professionals have to integrate these findings in follow-up suicidal care.en
dc.subjectdepressionen
dc.subjectquality of lifeen
dc.subjectsuicide, attempteden
dc.date.available2012-09-12T09:21:10Z-
dc.date.issued2012-09-12-
dc.date.issued2012-09-12en
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-12T09:21:10Z-
dc.conference.date2012en
dc.conference.name23rd International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationBrisbane, Australiaen
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