Development of Model Using Sociocognitive Variables to Explain Self-Care in Women with Type 2 Diabetes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/243395
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development of Model Using Sociocognitive Variables to Explain Self-Care in Women with Type 2 Diabetes
Author(s):
Grinslade, Susan; Jing, Hongjuan; Paper, Bruce
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Kappa
Author Details:
Grinslade, Susan, PhD, RN, APRN, BC; Jing, Hongjuan, RN, BS; Paper, Bruce, BA
Abstract:
Purpose: Sociocognitive variables of self-efficacy, social support, outcome expectancies, and barriers to self-care were used to examine self-care practices in adult women with Type 2 diabetes. Two instruments to assess diabetes self-efficacy and social support in women were developed. A convenience sample of 198 adult women with diabetes volunteered to participate in the study. Participants completed a demographic questionnaire, Social Support for Women with Diabetes Scale, Diabetes Self-Efficacy Scale, Barriers to Self-Care Scale, Outcome Expectancies Scale, and the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Scale. Additionally, the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding was completed and used to control for confounding introduced by self-report data. Methods: The sample had a mean age of 51.5, was 79.7% Hispanic, and had mean duration of diabetes of 10.3 years. Multiple linear regression was used to determine the relationship between the explanatory variables and diabetes self-care activities. Analysis resulted in five explanatory models. Results: Income, self-efficacy, barriers to diet, and Hispanic ethnicity explained 37% (r 2 = .37) of diet self-care. The variance in medication self-care (15%) was explained by barriers to medication and social support. The combined use of oral and injectable medication and self-efficacy explained 32% (r2 = .32) of the variance in self-monitoring of blood glucose. Exercise self-care had 37% (r2 = .37) of the variance explained by barriers to exercise, income, and social support. Primary variables of interest, self-efficacy and social support, accounted for 74% (r2 = .74) of the variance in diabetes self-care. Conclusion: Findings from this study exemplify the importance of examining unique aspects of care which influence diabetes self-care within the social context of women's lives. In particular, self-efficacy, social support and barriers were significant explanatory variables.
Keywords:
type 2 diabetes; self-efficacy; social support
Repository Posting Date:
12-Sep-2012
Date of Publication:
12-Sep-2012
Conference Date:
2012
Conference Name:
23rd International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Brisbane, Australia
Note:
Items submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleDevelopment of Model Using Sociocognitive Variables to Explain Self-Care in Women with Type 2 Diabetesen
dc.contributor.authorGrinslade, Susanen
dc.contributor.authorJing, Hongjuanen
dc.contributor.authorPaper, Bruceen
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Kappaen
dc.author.detailsGrinslade, Susan, PhD, RN, APRN, BC; Jing, Hongjuan, RN, BS; Paper, Bruce, BAen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/243395-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Sociocognitive variables of self-efficacy, social support, outcome expectancies, and barriers to self-care were used to examine self-care practices in adult women with Type 2 diabetes. Two instruments to assess diabetes self-efficacy and social support in women were developed. A convenience sample of 198 adult women with diabetes volunteered to participate in the study. Participants completed a demographic questionnaire, Social Support for Women with Diabetes Scale, Diabetes Self-Efficacy Scale, Barriers to Self-Care Scale, Outcome Expectancies Scale, and the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Scale. Additionally, the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding was completed and used to control for confounding introduced by self-report data. Methods: The sample had a mean age of 51.5, was 79.7% Hispanic, and had mean duration of diabetes of 10.3 years. Multiple linear regression was used to determine the relationship between the explanatory variables and diabetes self-care activities. Analysis resulted in five explanatory models. Results: Income, self-efficacy, barriers to diet, and Hispanic ethnicity explained 37% (r 2 = .37) of diet self-care. The variance in medication self-care (15%) was explained by barriers to medication and social support. The combined use of oral and injectable medication and self-efficacy explained 32% (r2 = .32) of the variance in self-monitoring of blood glucose. Exercise self-care had 37% (r2 = .37) of the variance explained by barriers to exercise, income, and social support. Primary variables of interest, self-efficacy and social support, accounted for 74% (r2 = .74) of the variance in diabetes self-care. Conclusion: Findings from this study exemplify the importance of examining unique aspects of care which influence diabetes self-care within the social context of women's lives. In particular, self-efficacy, social support and barriers were significant explanatory variables.en
dc.subjecttype 2 diabetesen
dc.subjectself-efficacyen
dc.subjectsocial supporten
dc.date.available2012-09-12T09:21:39Z-
dc.date.issued2012-9-12-
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-12T09:21:39Z-
dc.conference.date2012en
dc.conference.name23rd International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationBrisbane, Australiaen
dc.description.noteItems submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.