2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/243405
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PRIME Time in the ED: Nurse Education to Screen for Substance Use
Author(s):
Mitchell, Ann M.; Terhorst, Lauren; Hagle, Holly; Talcott, Kimberly; Owens, Kimberly; Woomer, Gail R.; Christie, Laurie; Lindsay, Dawn; Kane, Irene; Boucek, Lynn Owens; Puskar, Kathryn
Author Details:
Mitchell, Ann M., PhD, RN, FAAN, ammi@pitt.edu; Terhorst, Lauren, PhD; Hagle, Holly, MA; Talcott, Kimberly, MPA; Owens, Kimberly , MSN, BSN, CS; Woomer, Gail R. , RN, MN, IBCLC; Christie, Laurie, RN; Lindsay, Dawn, PhD; Kane, Irene, PhD, MSN, RN, CNAA, HFI; Boucek, Lynn Owens, RN; Puskar, Kathryn, DrPH, MN, MPH, FAAN;
Abstract:
Background: Substance use is a worldwide public-health priority. Annually, 2.5 million die from the harmful use of alcohol (World Health Organization (WHO) 2011 Global Status Report).  In 2008, WHO reported 155 to 250 million people (~5% worldwide population) used psychoactive substances.  Risks associated with use of alcohol and other drugs can lead to accidents, violent behavior, and societal/developmental issues.  To address substance use risks, an interprofessional (academic-community-health provider) partnership trained Emergency Department Registered Nurses (EDRNs) to utilize an evidence-based practice (Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment, SBIRT) to screen patients for substance misuse.  Screening provides patients timely brief interventions enhancing motivation to reduce use or follow-up on assessment referral.  This project is significant because an opportunity exists in the ED to identify, address, and reduce the risks of an otherwise under-identified cause of ED admissions. 

Methods: The Nursing School partnered with the Medical Center and an additions-training nonprofit to train four hospitals located in urban, rural, and low-income areas.  EDRNs were trained in primary prevention of substance abuse by improving the quality of care via SBIRT intervention.  Objectives include providing 1) a two-hour training teaching EDRNs the evidence-based practice and 2) a skill-building component to teach EDRNs to reduce health risks of substance use through clinical practice opportunities.

Results: EDRNs were surveyed on perceptions-of and confidence-in assisting patients who use substances pre, post, and 30-days after training. Results suggest a linking of evidence-based innovation with practice change. 

Conclusions of Significance: A significant opportunity exists in the ED to identify, address, and reduce risks of patient substance use. As a result of ED education, patients’ need for intervention is identified earlier along the continuum of use, abuse, and dependence. Implementing this evidence-based practice in the ED increases patient exposure to intervention and community-specific referrals.

Keywords:
Substance Use; Implementation; Evidence-Based Practice
Repository Posting Date:
12-Sep-2012
Date of Publication:
12-Sep-2012
Conference Date:
2012
Conference Name:
23rd International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Brisbane, Australia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePRIME Time in the ED: Nurse Education to Screen for Substance Useen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Ann M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorTerhorst, Laurenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHagle, Hollyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTalcott, Kimberlyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOwens, Kimberlyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWoomer, Gail R.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorChristie, Laurieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLindsay, Dawnen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKane, Ireneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoucek, Lynn Owensen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPuskar, Kathrynen_GB
dc.author.detailsMitchell, Ann M., PhD, RN, FAAN, ammi@pitt.edu; Terhorst, Lauren, PhD; Hagle, Holly, MA; Talcott, Kimberly, MPA; Owens, Kimberly , MSN, BSN, CS; Woomer, Gail R. , RN, MN, IBCLC; Christie, Laurie, RN; Lindsay, Dawn, PhD; Kane, Irene, PhD, MSN, RN, CNAA, HFI; Boucek, Lynn Owens, RN; Puskar, Kathryn, DrPH, MN, MPH, FAAN;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/243405-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Substance use is a worldwide public-health priority. Annually, 2.5 million die from the harmful use of alcohol (World Health Organization (WHO) 2011 Global Status Report).&nbsp; In 2008, WHO reported 155 to 250 million people (~5% worldwide population) used psychoactive substances.&nbsp; Risks associated with use of alcohol and other drugs can lead to accidents, violent behavior, and societal/developmental issues.&nbsp; To address substance use risks, an interprofessional (academic-community-health provider) partnership trained Emergency Department Registered Nurses (EDRNs) to utilize an evidence-based practice (Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment, SBIRT) to screen patients for substance misuse.&nbsp; Screening provides patients timely brief interventions enhancing motivation to reduce use or follow-up on assessment referral.&nbsp; This project is significant because an opportunity exists in the ED to identify, address, and reduce the risks of an otherwise under-identified cause of ED admissions.&nbsp; <p>Methods: The Nursing School partnered with the Medical Center and an additions-training nonprofit to train four hospitals located in urban, rural, and low-income areas.&nbsp; EDRNs were trained in primary prevention of substance abuse by improving the quality of care via SBIRT intervention.&nbsp; Objectives include providing 1) a two-hour training teaching EDRNs the evidence-based practice and 2) a skill-building component to teach EDRNs to reduce health risks of substance use through clinical practice opportunities. <p>Results: EDRNs were surveyed on perceptions-of and confidence-in assisting patients who use substances pre, post, and 30-days after training. Results suggest a linking of evidence-based innovation with practice change.&nbsp; <p>Conclusions of Significance: A significant opportunity exists in the ED to identify, address, and reduce risks of patient substance use. As a result of ED education, patients&rsquo; need for intervention is identified earlier along the continuum of use, abuse, and dependence. Implementing this evidence-based practice in the ED increases patient exposure to intervention and community-specific referrals.en_GB
dc.subjectSubstance Useen_GB
dc.subjectImplementationen_GB
dc.subjectEvidence-Based Practiceen_GB
dc.date.available2012-09-12T09:21:47Z-
dc.date.issued2012-09-12-
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-12T09:21:47Z-
dc.conference.date2012en_GB
dc.conference.name23rd International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationBrisbane, Australiaen_GB
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