2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/243470
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Associated with the Decision to be a Living Kidney Donor
Author(s):
Nolan, Marie T.; St. Ours, Christine; Taylor, Laura; Tudor, Carrie; Lee, Mei Ching; Rose, Linda; Belcher, Anne E.
Author Details:
Nolan, Marie T., PhD, RN, FAAN, mnolan3@jhu.edu; St. Ours, Christine, BSN; Taylor, Laura, PhD; Tudor, Carrie, MPH; Lee, Mei Ching, PhD; Rose, Linda, PhD, RN; Belcher, Anne E., PhD, RN, FAAN, ANEF;
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine living kidney donor preferences for a shared model of decision making to donate and factors related to these preferences

 Methods: Degner’s concept of decision control preference was used.  Individuals being evaluated in the living kidney donation clinic of a transplant center in a U.S. hospital were surveyed at baseline and by mail three months after donation surgery.  At baseline they indicated the decision style used for important health decisions other than donation (independent/shared/reliant). At time 2 (3 mos after surgery) they were asked to indicate the decision style that they had used to make the decision to donate.  Results: 254 donors were enrolled and 237 provided complete data to time 2.

 Results: 30 (13%)  donors preferred a shared decision style to donate. Sex, age, and race were not associated with decision style used to donate but the decision style used for health care decisions other than kidney donation was (chi square 9.53, df = 1, p = .002). Those who normally used the shared style of decision making in health care decisions and married donors, were more likely to use this style in deciding to donate their kidney. Decision style was not related to satisfaction with donation

 Conclusion: The preferences for some donor candidates to involve another family member in the decision to be a donor should be respected.  Further study should examine whether support for a shared donor decision style would increase the likelihood of donor candidates going on to donation

Keywords:
decision making; living organ donation
Repository Posting Date:
12-Sep-2012
Date of Publication:
12-Sep-2012
Conference Date:
2012
Conference Name:
23rd International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Brisbane, Australia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Associated with the Decision to be a Living Kidney Donoren_GB
dc.contributor.authorNolan, Marie T.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSt. Ours, Christineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Lauraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTudor, Carrieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLee, Mei Chingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRose, Lindaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBelcher, Anne E.en_GB
dc.author.detailsNolan, Marie T., PhD, RN, FAAN, mnolan3@jhu.edu; St. Ours, Christine, BSN; Taylor, Laura, PhD; Tudor, Carrie, MPH; Lee, Mei Ching, PhD; Rose, Linda, PhD, RN; Belcher, Anne E., PhD, RN, FAAN, ANEF;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/243470-
dc.description.abstract<strong><b>Purpose</strong>: </b>The purpose of this study was to examine living kidney donor preferences for a shared model of decision making to donate and factors related to these preferences <p>&nbsp;<strong><b>Methods</strong>: </b>Degner&rsquo;s concept of decision control preference was used.&nbsp; Individuals being evaluated in the living kidney donation clinic of a transplant center in a U.S. hospital were surveyed at baseline and by mail three months after donation surgery. &nbsp;At baseline they indicated the decision style used for important health decisions other than donation (independent/shared/reliant). At time 2 (3 mos after surgery) they were asked to indicate the decision style that they had used to make the decision to donate.&nbsp; <b>Results: </b> 254 donors were enrolled and 237 provided complete data to time 2. <p>&nbsp;<strong>Results</strong>:&nbsp;30 (13%)&nbsp; donors preferred a shared decision style to donate. Sex, age, and race were not associated with decision style used to donate but the decision style used for health care decisions other than kidney donation was (chi square 9.53, df = 1, p = .002). Those who normally used the shared style of decision making in health care decisions and married donors, were more likely to use this style in deciding to donate their kidney. Decision style was not related to satisfaction with donation <p>&nbsp;<strong><b>Conclusion</strong>: </b>The preferences for some donor candidates to involve another family member in the decision to be a donor should be respected. &nbsp;Further study should examine whether support for a shared donor decision style would increase the likelihood of donor candidates going on to donationen_GB
dc.subjectdecision makingen_GB
dc.subjectliving organ donationen_GB
dc.date.available2012-09-12T09:22:42Z-
dc.date.issued2012-09-12-
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-12T09:22:42Z-
dc.conference.date2012en_GB
dc.conference.name23rd International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationBrisbane, Australiaen_GB
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