Environmentally-Friendly Hospitals and the Implications for Nursing Practice within the Australian Healthcare Context

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/243552
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Environmentally-Friendly Hospitals and the Implications for Nursing Practice within the Australian Healthcare Context
Author(s):
Lewis, Teresa M. A.; Moxham, Lorna; Broadbent, Marc
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
N/A
Author Details:
Lewis, Teresa M. A., RN, GradDip, (Mid), teresa.lewis@bigpond.com; Moxham, Lorna, PhD, RN, MHN, MEd, BHSc, DAS (Nsg), GradCertOH&S, GradCertQualMgt,?FCON, FACMH; Broadbent, Marc, RN, GradCert, GradDip, MEd;
Abstract:
Purpose: The aim of this paper is to present results from a PHD project that examined implications for Registered Nurses practice when employed in hospitals that were using strategies to mitigate their impacts on climate change. Such strategies included the implementation of green teams, recycling and even worm farms. It was found that hospitals have to move from a ‘business as usual approach’, to one that is more environmentally sustainable. 

Methods: The phenomenological methodology included an in-depth review of the literature which examined climate mitigating factors within the health care environment, particularly within Australian hospitals. The qualitative approach included in-depth semi structured interviews that permitted participants to express their experiences related to nursing practice in hospitals that are increasingly known as global, green and healthy hospitals. 

Results: Contemporary nursing practice is dynamic.  Not only does technology change rapidly and patient acuity is increasingly more complex, registered nurses increasingly have to consider how their practice impacts on the world’s climate. This adds yet another layer to what nurses already pack into a busy daily agenda.    

Conclusion: No longer can health care organizations continue with 'business as usual', hospitals and nurses now have to be highly cognizant of the implications of their practice on the world’s climate. 

Keywords:
Registered nurses; Nursing practice; Environmentally-friendly hospitals
Repository Posting Date:
12-Sep-2012
Date of Publication:
12-Sep-2012 ; 12-Sep-2012
Conference Date:
2012
Conference Name:
23rd International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Brisbane, Australia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleEnvironmentally-Friendly Hospitals and the Implications for Nursing Practice within the Australian Healthcare Contexten
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Teresa M. A.en
dc.contributor.authorMoxham, Lornaen
dc.contributor.authorBroadbent, Marcen
dc.contributor.departmentN/Aen
dc.author.detailsLewis, Teresa M. A., RN, GradDip, (Mid), teresa.lewis@bigpond.com; Moxham, Lorna, PhD, RN, MHN, MEd, BHSc, DAS (Nsg), GradCertOH&S, GradCertQualMgt,?FCON, FACMH; Broadbent, Marc, RN, GradCert, GradDip, MEd;en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/243552-
dc.description.abstract<b>Purpose: </b>The aim of this paper is to present results from a PHD project that examined implications for Registered Nurses practice when employed in hospitals that were using strategies to mitigate their impacts on climate change. Such strategies included the implementation of green teams, recycling and even worm farms. It was found that hospitals have to move from a &lsquo;business as usual approach&rsquo;, to one that is more environmentally sustainable.&nbsp; <p><b>Methods: </b>The phenomenological methodology<b> </b>included an in-depth review of the literature which examined climate mitigating factors within the health care environment, particularly within&nbsp;Australian hospitals. The qualitative approach included in-depth semi structured interviews that permitted participants to express their experiences related to nursing practice in hospitals that are increasingly known as global, green and healthy hospitals.&nbsp; <p><b>Results: </b>Contemporary nursing practice is dynamic. &nbsp;Not only does technology change rapidly and patient acuity is increasingly more complex, registered nurses increasingly have to consider how their practice impacts on the world&rsquo;s climate. This adds yet another layer to what nurses already pack into a busy daily agenda.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <p><b>Conclusion: </b>No longer can health care organizations continue with 'business as usual', hospitals and nurses now have to be highly cognizant of the implications of their practice on the world&rsquo;s climate.<b>&nbsp;</b>en
dc.subjectRegistered nursesen
dc.subjectNursing practiceen
dc.subjectEnvironmentally-friendly hospitalsen
dc.date.available2012-09-12T09:23:53Z-
dc.date.issued2012-09-12-
dc.date.issued2012-09-12en
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-12T09:23:53Z-
dc.conference.date2012en
dc.conference.name23rd International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationBrisbane, Australiaen
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