2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/243562
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preventing Sharp Injuries Among Nurses and Midwives in Sub-Saharan Africa
Author(s):
Smith, Barbara; Blanshan, Sue A.; Zhu, Shijun; Maimbolwa, Margaret
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
NA
Author Details:
Smith, Barbara, PhD, RN, FAAN, bsmith@son.umaryland.edu; Blanshan, Sue A., PhD; Zhu, Shijun, PhD; Maimbolwa, Margaret, RN, PhD;
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the risks of sharps (needlestick) injuries among nurses and midwives providing care to patients in Sub-Saharan Africa. 

 Methods: An anonymous questionnaire was completed by 712 nurses from 11 different African countries who were attending the African Midwives Research Network meeting in Nairobi, Kenya and Dar Es Salaam Tanzania or other organized nursing meetings. Questions related to their knowledge of universal precautions, level of education, availability and use of protective apparel, sharps and splash injuries/exposures, work schedule, and needle use.  Generalized estimating equation models, accommodating the correlation within the residing country, were employed to examine the effects of work schedule and needle use on sharps injuries.

 Results: Results showed nurses who made home visits had higher odds of sharps injuries (adjusted OR [aOR] = 1.52, p = 0.043). Nurses engaged in direct care ≥ 50% of time (aOR = 2.31, p = 0.003 for 50-80%; aOR = 2.09, p = 0.006 for over 80%) or called in to work “off-hours” (aOR = 1.71, p = 0.008) were more likely to sustain an injury.  As could be expected, the number of times a nurse used a needle was associated with higher odds of injuries (aOR=1.61, P=0.015) as were starting IVs and recapping needles.    In addition, educational preparation and knowledge of Universal precautions will be discussed.

 Conclusion: Delivering care in patient’s home, more time spent in direct care, and increased needle use are risk factors for sharps injuries.  Interventions aimed at reducing the risk of injuries, improving procedures for working in the home, reducing the number of times the nurse must handle needles, and use of safety engineered needles may reduce blood borne pathogen (BBP) exposure in nurses and midwives practicing in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Keywords:
Blood borne pathogens; Prevention of occupational transmission; Sub-Saharan Africa
Repository Posting Date:
12-Sep-2012
Date of Publication:
12-Sep-2012 ; 12-Sep-2012
Conference Date:
2012
Conference Name:
23rd International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Brisbane, Australia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titlePreventing Sharp Injuries Among Nurses and Midwives in Sub-Saharan Africaen
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Barbaraen
dc.contributor.authorBlanshan, Sue A.en
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Shijunen
dc.contributor.authorMaimbolwa, Margareten
dc.contributor.departmentNAen
dc.author.detailsSmith, Barbara, PhD, RN, FAAN, bsmith@son.umaryland.edu; Blanshan, Sue A., PhD; Zhu, Shijun, PhD; Maimbolwa, Margaret, RN, PhD;en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/243562-
dc.description.abstract<b>Purpose: </b>The purpose of this study was to examine the risks of sharps (needlestick) injuries among nurses and midwives providing care to patients in Sub-Saharan Africa.&nbsp; <p>&nbsp;<b>Methods: </b>An anonymous questionnaire was completed by 712 nurses from 11 different African countries who were attending the African Midwives Research Network meeting in Nairobi, Kenya and Dar Es Salaam Tanzania or other organized nursing meetings. Questions related to their knowledge of universal precautions, level of education, availability and use of protective apparel, sharps and splash injuries/exposures, work schedule, and needle use. &nbsp;Generalized estimating equation models, accommodating the correlation within the residing country, were employed to examine the effects of work schedule and needle use on sharps injuries. <p>&nbsp;<b>Results: </b>Results showed nurses who made home visits had higher odds of sharps injuries (adjusted OR [aOR] = 1.52, p = 0.043). Nurses engaged in direct care &ge; 50% of time (aOR = 2.31, p<i> </i>= 0.003 for 50-80%; aOR = 2.09, p<i> </i>= 0.006 for over 80%) or called in to work &ldquo;off-hours&rdquo; (aOR = 1.71, p<i> </i>= 0.008) were more likely to sustain an injury. &nbsp;As could be expected, the number of times a nurse used a needle was associated with higher odds of injuries (aOR=1.61, <i>P</i>=0.015) as were starting IVs and recapping needles. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;In addition, educational preparation and knowledge of Universal precautions will be discussed. <p>&nbsp;<b>Conclusion: </b>Delivering care in patient&rsquo;s home, more time spent in direct care, and increased needle use are risk factors for sharps injuries.&nbsp; Interventions aimed at reducing the risk of injuries, improving procedures for working in the home, reducing the number of times the nurse must handle needles, and use of safety engineered needles may reduce blood borne pathogen (BBP) exposure in nurses and midwives practicing in Sub-Saharan Africa.en
dc.subjectBlood borne pathogensen
dc.subjectPrevention of occupational transmissionen
dc.subjectSub-Saharan Africaen
dc.date.available2012-09-12T09:24:01Z-
dc.date.issued2012-09-12-
dc.date.issued2012-09-12en
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-12T09:24:01Z-
dc.conference.date2012en
dc.conference.name23rd International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationBrisbane, Australiaen
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